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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
File 011
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 011. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/80.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 011. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/80

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 011, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/80.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript ' pursued distribu- y because countries seriously nmunissi mist anJ nmunism- licv state ;-s to take ■ ComnW' ecure ao States, iressed by who stat nvestmen' economic nfriendW ooel steer- :>f foreig" ign poHJ i summed the opp0, ;n aid pi* a nationf rmmunis's ee Enrol" ted in oi*j lie Unite" itself in"1 ming v". publish*1 v Stof 4 Record I if India! traight & sending* abroad o win v* ies becoi" FREEDOMS NEW TASK By JOHN FOSTER DULLES This statement* l>y the Secretary of State concerning the new Soviet foreign policy and the foreign aid program of the United States is important in ■hat it reveals the thinking of ihe man who will play a dominant role in administering whatever foreign aid program Congress may adopt. win iff IT NTIL recently, the foreign policy of Soviet communism was based on fanatical intolerance of all other systems and upon the organization of violence to °*erthrow all other systems. Marx, Lenin, and Stalin all Jlght that it was necessary to hate all who differed from e Soviet Communist creed; and they also taught that n'v by violence could international communism achieve lts destined goals. °ut the free nations, when confronted by this policy, JpW more strong, more resolute and more united. Conse- "'ritlv the Soviet pattern of hatred and violence pro- «*d ever diminishing returns. n Europe, the defensive strength of NATO was '°"nded out by the addition of the Federal Republic of trend ermany. >i the western Pacific, freedom was consolidated by gplg to our ANZUS, Philippine and Japanese treaties, j.6 new mutual defense treaties with Korea and with the Public of China. And the Congress, you will recall. The Soviet rulers trumpeted all this throughout the world as proof that Soviet Communist policy was no longer predatory. We hoped that this was so. But we were highly skeptical. We well knew that under Leninism any tactic is admissible and that the change had come about, not through change of heart, but because old methods had failed. On the other hand, we knew that the new Soviet tactics of increased tolerance and less dependence upon violence required a basic change in Soviet Communist doctrine. This can, in the long run, have major internal consequences and set up within Russia powerful liberalizing rsafterj ing deft! -V find 1 tralists >" ss milBl promi*? been A is,, in rritory * he unO n the i e Amerf for for6'1 whether. and wW« t be g« ie ould sacn'u | 1,1 A l ,,nrlr'-'ii--(t up." I» - March >' jj Oorized the President to use the Armed Forces of the > ''ed States in the Formosa area, if necessary, for its Jfense. 1 southeast Asia, the Western powers joined with Asian (0 ers in a treaty for collective- security, and they trans- tied the Indochina struggle from a struggle against K uialism to a struggle by truly independent nations — j "am, Laos, and Cambodia — to maintain their freedom. (.i | 'he Middle East, the northern tier concept, without f0 enging the- concept of Arab unity, has drawn together li- .Co"ective defense four nations which, for 2,500 miles, 11 In.i .. . _ .... is, !Ust south of Russia's frontiers. |L9<* of these formulations of free world resolve lay itjt V;ist mobile power of the United States which con- society of nations But the fanatical teaching of a generation cannot be erased all at once. Also the change had not gone so far that there could not almost overnight be a sudden reversal to the old practice of intolerance and violence. Also we could only safely assume that the new tactics were designed as a new means of conquest. So we did not relax our vigilance or allow our military posture to slump. But, on the other hand, we do not assume fatalistically that there can be no evolution within Russia or that Russia's rulers will always be predatory. Some day — I would not attempt to guess when — Russia will be governed by men who put the welfare of the Russian people above world conquest. It is our basic policy to seek to advance tlie coming of that day. So hist spring, when Soviet conduct began to change, we determined to do all that we safely could to make that change a first installment toward an eventual Russian state- that would be a normal, not abnormal, member of the c, tpd a formidable deterrent to open armed aggression. ■L "u' Soviets had either to give up their expansionist .' t)r turn to other means to advance them, stq n'n and Stalin had taught that, under these' circum- to es, there should be no giving up, but rather a shift g* methods. Kf\ ' * year, the Soviet rulers concluded that the time '-'>rr|U'"" '" cnange basically their approach to the non- m"nist world. % j 'if- 'rt'atv■; thev made their pilgrimage of repentance ;>;;;,.XK r;c,m"; tlu'>' offered to establish diplomatic relations with M lv of 1955, the Soviet rulers signed the Austrian |ohn T-. -A\ I VI i.in-'1 ,1 . yrtxH"*^ June, J ',n> and to make- a belated peace- with Japan. In ..,,' "'<' Chinese Communists, at the Bandung Confer- , "ave at least lip service to methods other than out- ..,. vic>le ,»- - ify...,. ^ Fo, "ence. '"I- Hie Philadelphia BultaMn Forum al Philadelphia, Pa., on Feb. w v, Ni us. June, 1956 One major step we took was to join with Britain and France to invite1 the Russian rulers to a conference of heads of government. At that summit Conference- at Geneva President Eisenhower did more than anv other man could have done to open up to the Soviet rulers the vista of a new era of friendly relations between our countries. We cannot yet measure what has been the full effect of that Conference. The gains will be- measurable only in the- future. For the time being the Soviet rulers, finding that the road of intolerance and violence was blocked, have subordinated those elements of their old creed in the hope that, in a new garb, they could still pursue conquest. Now thev pursue their foreign-policy goals with less manifestation of intolerance anel less emphasis on violence. Their foreign policy now puts large emphasis upon seeking political cooperation with left-wing Socialists, whom formerly they detested. Finally there is heavy Page 9 V fs ing e I - I.
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