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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 010. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/79.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 010. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/79

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 010, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/79.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript r j on their soil since the spirit of nationalism and the remembrance of colonialism are still strong. The disparities of living standards of these Americans and the mass of the people create jealousy instead of friendship, and many of the Americans who participate in the technical assistance program do not exercise tact in refraining from boasting about the achievements of the American way of life. Also, a source of ill will toward the United States is the division of our aid among recipients. Those who do not receive as large a grant as other countries resent us. Examples are found in the Middle East where the comparative size of aid received by Israel and the Arab states has been, and remains, a frequent source of criticism of the United States. Similarly, the provision of military assistance to Pakistan led to denunciations of the United States in India inasmuch as they were involved in a border dispute with Pakistan. Nehru called for mass rioting to show their displeasure. Our assistance to India helped her to become self- sufficient in rice, but this hurt the Burmese and Thai export markets anel increased the economic difficulties of those countries. Latin Americans are extremely disappointed with the small amount of aid they received during the postwar period in comparison with the much larger sums given to the countries of Western Europe, and on the other hand, the Western European nations disapprove of our aid to Far Eastern powers because this diverts aid from them. Opponents of foreign aid contend that although Soviet offers of aid and expanded trade have made a favorable- impression, disappointment will eventually follow in the underdeveloped countries because the Soviet Union has a long record of not living up to its economic bargains with the West and will no doubt continue true to form. These critics argue that it might have been better for us to withdraw from the Egyptian Aswan Dam project and allow the Soviets to build it. Such a project would use immense amounts of Soviet resources which could not be devoted to strengthening the Soviet Union internally, and with the dam taking considerable time for completion, the lengthy presence of Soviet technicians on Egyptian soil would be certain to lead to animosity toward them. Furthermore, if we make an evident attempt to match Soviet aid in this instance we will only earn the contempt of the Egyptians. Some opponents of aid to underdeveloped countries state that it is a mistake to compete in international charity with a totalitarian government which has the- power to depress its people's standard of living in order to Page 8 finance foreign aid. Proponents counter with the view that the efficiency of our free enterprise system makes it easier for us to compete with the Soviet bloc in economic competition than in military efforts, and urge that we take up the challenge and prove to the world that our system is more productive as well as more desirable from the standpoint of freedom. PRO AND CON QUOTES ON FOREIGN AID From the Town Meeting national radio broadcast April 1, 1956 . . . There is more anti-American feeling today in almost every country we have helped than there was in 191ft when Marshall aid began. That's understandable. We are the rich uncle who has moved into the home of his poor nephew and is now telling him anel his family how they should live. And on top of it all, forcing the poor relations every Saturday night to look at motion pictures hragging about how rich the domineering old fossil is. . . James L. Wick, Publisher of Human Events ... If these monies (foreign aid) were labelled "the anti- Cm,,unii-l fund," there would be little oppositif»n to them and a much clearer understanding of the purposes and reasons for them. We should ... he willing to say to those free countries who are willing to help themselves that America is in the light fur freedom to stay and that we are prepared to assist them in their own advance, economically and politically, towarel freedom. I think that we sboubl tmly spend money in those countries that we are convinced want to build themselves as free nations. In other worrls, I do not believe that we should spend money on a Soviet satellite that was determined to remain a Soviet satellite. . . James Roosevelt, U. S. Representative, (D) of California Opponents of aid have advanced the theory that our assistance has restrained local efforts for improvement, stating that many Middle Eastern vil- lagers have refused to do things for themselves because, in their opinion. if they waited long enough the U. S. would do it for them. They note that many underdeveloped countries impose extreme restrictions on private foreign investment and have done exceedingly little to mobilize domestic capital. Critics state that the policy pursued by the United States in the distribution of aid has been all wrong because' much of our aid has gone to countries who are either neutralist, seriously threatened with internal communism. or who have gone Communist an'' then have thrown off communism- Those who oppose this policy state that this encourages countries to take' a neutralist stand or to allow Communist infiltration in order to secure additional aid from the United States This opinion was well expressed by William Henry Chamberlin who stated, "'Billions for private investmefl on fair terms, not a cent for econonii handouts, especially to unfriendly neutrals' would be a very good steel ing direction in the field of foreigt- economic relations."7 In regard to the new foreign polifl of the Soviet, John T. Flynn suinint''1 up the feeling of many of the oppf nents of the American foreign aid pi* gram when he stated on a natioDJ radio broadcast, "The Communis" don't care about so-called free Enrol/ and Africa. They are interested in ofl* thing — in encouraging the Unit''1' States government to spend itself in" bankruptcy."8 This same line of reasoning V* expresed in an editorial publish''' recently in the Indianapolis Star a''1 placed in the Congressional Record W Senator William E. Jenner of India'''1 It stated, "For ten years straight i'" State Department has been sending * average of $5 billion a year abroad! foreign aid. The idea is to w cold war by helping our allies becoll strong and united and to win mjl allies to our side. Yet today, after ,l years of doing the same thing defc" ive-ly, what do we find? We find C allies less united. The neutralists ;1 more neutral. There is less muWJ strength abroad than was promisy And the Soviet Union has beei ning skirmish after skirmish in ™ eohl war both in taking territory "' in winning support from the unC mitted nations." IT 11 %ted ,s »'• tn, - '%:• * aid and who must decide whetnC'i tj_ me not it should be continued and wh*j \^' 'ast , er advantages which might be S^Cj, c°rne m|inisl So the battle rages on. In the B| analysis, of course, it is the AmC'.j taxpayer who foots the bill for for61' NTI nisi sysl *»erthrow ?ught thi ^ Sen ie l^ybyv "s destine But the ^ mon ■jlentlv tl Vdeve , Ir> Eur >ndt-d r ^Diany. i^ing to t "ew n public utS-Z(,.] J" SOllth Krs in S* th gSalisn >»,, I 4htheN Lc°Uecti >« sou !*«* oi va.st continuance would M» by it would be worth the sacrifu which its - necessary. Acknowledgemen.1 is mode to the Enterprise Association, Inc., 1012 Fourte v w., Washington 5, D, C, for A.E.A. R«P" 817, used as source material, ■•'Uncle Shylock and the Dollar Gap," b^JH Henry Chamberlin, Human Events, March * ft I, real Ct0; tht 1 !)->(>. ■"Behind Broadcast Reprint M-113, Scheduled Vlniu-'i *1 the HeadUsm," by ]<>hn T- ■ i» -;ice Svsln . America's Future, March Inc. 25, 1956. I'm'l"1'1' ,;nr .,> Facts Forum News, }uni\ the- ( gave violer 8$ befo, " I i ORi
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