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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 009. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/78.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 009. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/78

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 009, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/78.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript the aid-receiving country which can be used to further our objectives. Such hinds were used last year, for example, to build roads and other public works in Southern Italy where Unemployment and low standards of living have constantly plagued the ''ctinoniic growth of the country, which as a strong anti-Communistic Country would certainly be a worthwhile ally. Critics of this type of aid contend that these claims are not valid. They state that to the extent we exercise jjoonomic control in foreign countries "tie to our control of counterpart '"'ids, this constitutes American intervention in the internal affairs of sover- «gn states, is wrong in principle and u'll ultimately wink to our detriment. They further state- that to the ('"tent counterpart funds are turned "V('r to the government of the aid- receiving country, they become a s"hstitiite- for taxation by theit government of its own people, and thev note "at the major reason for providing ' ''tense- support often appears to be a "Wsire to support the budget of the jjW-receiving country, and is done at ."' cost of increasing our own na- ,'onal debt and unbalancing our own TECHNICAL COOPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE , 'hose who favor these types of aid '"'" that poverty causes communism, ,"■' therefore our assistance to imder- tl;veloped countries to help them at- l|"" higher standards of living also (|l's to prevent the spread of com- "»nism. Thev state this vi)nS; first, ley th", is is for two rea alleviation of the mis ''ri S1 ls of poverty makes people less , .S(-'('ptible to the promises of commu- (I '"'■ and s,t onel, our aid strengthens e economies of underdeveloped jjjritnVs and enables them to provide 'tary defense for their country. ,. " Asia, the present democratic gov- t|( H'"'uts ma; be expected to combat Polf-lr°''c''s "^ cornmunism only if the „j nCal stability of their present form tli,""v'T"""'"t c,,ii i,(, maintained and il()'■ ,can achieve .some measure ol eco- ff'cprogress. "ot -i democratic states in Asia can- j»e f 0w a '''I'' "I ct'i nie growth as ''Pit ''s *'lil* °^ Communist China, the Hi, "r'"m'tie-s for subversion within i,Iv' countries will be greatly in- ii-i,''|S''f'- Proponents of foreign aid con- tr,,, .'U|t the- people of these- countries N|, '"ado to believe that progress iW ' freedom can be rapid aild that ''ratio ■i IY ",eie progress should be prc- (;i^'.l" the- totalitarian brands be- iiiilj . jt also permits freedom for the ttij, dual. This is especially true in Bh where political progress has 'Pare.nti ' . i - Gently surpassed economic prog ress and where many Asian nations are looking for a comparison of the records of democracy and communism in providing economic development and improved standards of living for the total population. It is felt by many that these considerations have assumed greater importance since Soviet Russia has extended to underdeveloped countries loans and technical assistance and encouraged trade with them. Wide and favorable publicity has attended the Soviet offer to build the Aswan Dam for Egypt, to provide economic aid to India, to take Hurma's surplus rice in trade for much needed capital goods, etc. ft appears that the cold war is rapidly shifting to economic competition and the United States must successfully meet this competition if freedom and our own national security are to be maintained. That our aid does implant in underdeveloped countries a feeling of friendship anel trust for the United States is claimed by proponents. They state that in Andhra, India, prior to the recent election, the people were urged to support communism its a better economic and social system, but they replied that America could not be so terrible because we had been helping them to raise more rice. Proponents feel that the size ol our financial and technical assistance programs are closely watched by the rest of the world who feel that because of our wealth as a nation, we are morally obligated to help those less fortunate. In fact, proponents themselves advance the theory that only in economic assistance designed to relieve suffering and distress in underdeveloped countries can we reflect the true humanitarian desire of th,- American people. Perhaps the most oft-heard reason advanced for foreign aid is that our own interest is best served by extending this assistance-, inasmuch as approximately three-fourths of American imports of strategic and critical materials come from underdeveloped countries. Also, our export trade is greatly increased because industrialized countries buy more per capita from the United States than underdeveloped nations. All of these arguments are denied validity by many critics who challenge the fundamental assumption that poverty leads to communism. They sav evidence abounds that poverty anel communism are not uniquely related. For example, in France where one- fourth of the voters cast their ballots for Communists this year, there have been four years of rising wages and prosperity and the Communists are- strongest among the- liiglu-st paid workers. In Italy, comm.unism has its greatest strength in the highe-i-wage- industrial centers, not in the- southern V;T; s ''""Hi \i Nl us. /,, 1956 part where poverty rules. In India, communism has made least progress among the millions of untouchables and aborigines who are the very poorest people of India. Even in Italy, France, England, and the United States, interviews with Communists and ex-Communists revealed that twice as many skilled as unskilled workers join the Communist party. Critics further contend that the main danger of communism in underdeveloped countries stems from disgruntled intellectuals, who have little hope of advancement and who often cannot find ;i use for their over-trained minds in their primitive economies. Opponents claim there is little evidence that the present technical assistance programs of the United States will provide any direct improvement in the economic- and social status of the Asian intellectual, and that in this most important respect our aid funds are wasted. Opponents of the foreign aid programs argue that our aid to foreign countries has not made friends for us, but rather the feeling and appearance of inferiority which such aid engenders among the people of these countries brings ill will to us. They contend that it is foolish to give aid to countries which are neutralist, to countries that assume none of the obligations of collective security. They point out that the publicity concerning our projects which is necessary to direct good will towards us, is self-defeating because the- countries then regard the projects as foreign intervention. It is argued by many that good will cannot be gained in underdeveloped countries as long as we also aid former colonial powers. For example, our current military aid to France increases her ability to restrain North African nationalism, and this is resented by former colonial countries all over the world. It is also pointed out that military assistance is regarded by some of the underdeveloped countries as proof that we have war-like intentions. The theory is advanced that underdeveloped countries regard our aid efforts as an attempt to buy their thoughts and technical assistance is considered an arrogance. Thc^y resent our talk about saving them from poverty and communism. Nehru urged a program of austerity on his people with the words. "It is better that we progress a little- more slowly than allow ourselves in any way to depend on others. . . ." As proof that our charity has (ailed in its objectives, critics point out the extremely favorable response in underdeveloped countries such as India to Russia's trade offers and business loans. Main persons feel that people of underdeveloped countries resent the verv presence of numerous Americans Page 7 V I
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