Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
File 007
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 007. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/76.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 007. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/76

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 007, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/76.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript ill" tombs and that our financial resources Wnuld be put to better use by improv- lng the delivery systems for these Weapons inasmuch as new missile developments make our overseas bases vulnerable. Critics further state that a reduction of foreign aid expenditures Would strengthen our economy, giving "s greater domestic production and S'vinjr us greater opportunity to make »e technological advances which w°uld maintain free world superiority ov« the Soviet bloc. These critics feel that foreign aid Unbalances our economy. By financing a higher level of exports than would otherwise be possible, more workers jnd capital are drawn into production 0r export markets than can be em- P'oyed in this production when aid is discontinued, and by the development * competitive sources of supply j* "°ad, the retention of foreign mar- *?ts becomes even more difficult. They "e as an example of this the over- *Pansion of American agriculture in ."' early postwar years through for- sjjj-aid-financed exports and the recant problems when the foreign ""ces of supply had made recovery, 7"' the overseas market did not need ' ^erican agricultural exports. eiir 's are?"cd by those opposing for- »n ajrj (naj j,lst(.acl of encouraging increase in the defense cxpendi- j.res of the countries of Western " "("Pe, this should be discouraged so the resulting inert goods 'hut tya Services available for civilian use (Ik . restrain the growth of internal Satisfaction in these countries. They j*® for example the internal political ^' ''htljty of France, and point out W 1* instability i.s the perfect list K ground for internal Commu- I subversion, feelne °' tne reasons which critics Pro 'Si most important in their elisap- 'Icr °^ foreign aid, is that by a},] easi'ng the total resources avail- Staf to foreign countries, the United Stett! 'las allowed foreign govern- pti s to continue outmoded economic of**' ^lces and to try out impractical reforms at our expense. They fcftw ,0l|t that in many European r> iVes welfare expenditures eul 1 the ,c, tne average person's income by -.r 20 j),.,- cent. i,.||(n,l<s state that there is little evi- 'nis i' \n]'!'v"mc le: that the threat of communism ss serious, as a result of 'fir... ""'"' foreign aid. in those coun- II s Wl. _-■-_ • - 1 Mr '■r,l: ^nts communism is a real rather that left-wing gov- have been able to stay in '<r..t'' as a result of our help. This \ ',.'!* was aptly slated bv the S-,']( '''arles B. Brownson, U. S.' Rep- 'itif()J't,V(' of Indiana, who said, "It is %,.'"."atelv true that foreign aid by to rj^ng the total resources availa St>nn e for reign governments ible has allowed them to continue outmoded economic practices and to indulge their tastes for radical social welfare measures,"4 Propounding the same theory, Thurman Sensing in an article entitled "Stop Foreign Aid" appearing in the February issue of American Progress staled, "Even sound-thinking people in Britain, the best friend we have in this world — if we have any — will tell you that the worst thing that could have happened to them was the $4 billion loan we made them in 1946, which helped put their Socialist government in office, and the Marshall aid we gave them in the following years, which helped keep it in office. They will tell you that they would have gotten rid of their Socialist government — which brought them to the very brink of ruin — much sooner than they finally did without our interference. ". . . Discontinuance of foreign aid would enable us to cut taxes, which are now taking a third of our income. It would enable us to begin paying off our national debt, which is lamer than the combined debts of all the rest of the nations of the world and which we now give every appearance of passing on to our children as if we were in no way responsible for it. "The best assurance we have lor the preservation of freedom in this world is the maintenance of a strong econ- oniv in the United States of America — and this we cannot hope to maintain if we continue to profligately scatter our substance over the face of the earth. ". . . Indian newspapers praise Russia as the country's friend while they ignore American benefactions or take them lor granted. Alter all our aid, United Slates prestige has slipped to a new low in that country." Many persons raise the objection that our foreign aid dollars are not used lor the purposes for which they are given. Often part of our military assistance is converted by the recipient country into economic aid by the simple process of reducing its own defense expenditures anel diverting tins,- expenditures into civilian services, leaving it up to the V. S. to maintain the level of military strength thought necessary in that particular country. Critics advance the theory that if we spent as much for welfare purposes as many of our allies do, we would not be able to maintain our present level of national security and Foreign aid. The total tax burden in the United States is already approximately 30 per cent of total income, and it is felt that if foreign aid were cut. taxes could be lowered and people in this country could have more to spend 'Congressional Record, March 29, 1956, p. A2790. for their own purposes and for starting new businesses and expanding established industries. In answer to the argument that exports financed with our assistance sustain the level of employment in the I nited States, critics say this is discounted by the fact that the collection of taxes to provide that aid reduces spending within the United States. which, if not reduced, would provide the same or even greater employment than is provided by our increased exports. One of the foremost opponents of foreign aid, Eugene W. Castle, author and former president of Castle Films, wrote in an article published by Human Events that "If it were decided to declare a national dividend and to present to everv familv of three in the United States'a bonus of $2,100, the total cost to the Treasury would not equal the amount xvbich this nation has given away to foreign countries since 1940. ". . . If we pause to estimate the overdue domestic projects —new schools, health, slum clearance, rural rehabilitation, reclamation, power development, etc. — that these billions or a part of them would have bought if we had kept them at home, the foreign aid undertaking assumes a different and less alluring light"5 Inasmuch as foreign aid logically falls into seven types, as outlined earlier, it is proposed to consider. brie By, arguments for and against these seven types of aid. MILITARY ASSISTANCE AND OFF-SHORE PROCUREMENT It is claimed by those favoring mili- tarv assistance that dollars spent in this manner contribute more to our national security than a like sum expended within the United States, and that American air bases on foreign soil, which are a major force for peace because they provide the- delivery system for the atom and hydrogen bombs, exist only because our aid to these countries secures lor us the reciprocal right to establish air bases. It is argued that if we do not continue foreign aid, our allies will assume we are no longer interested in their saletv and we will then lose not only their present military strength, but also the bargaining power of our combined strength at conference tables. Proponents point out that World War II cost us approximately -ST billion a month, and that the proposed program of military assistance- would amount to about nine days of •" 'BilUonlHs'i The Disease of Foreign Aid," by l- vv. Castle, llt,m,m events, January --. ing e r I ACt, sp. oiicxi News, June, 1956 Page 5
File Name uhlib_1352973_v005_n006_007.jpg