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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 006. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/75.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 006. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/75

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 006, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/75.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript I I J living under which their economies can develop. This is a long-term process, in which their own efforts will play the major part, but in which our help can be crucial."1 Those who favor foreign aid point to the advantages of collective security for the United States, contending that the military forces which our allies provide defend the U. S. as well as their own borders. The U. S. supports, in varying degrees, more than 2(X) divisions, 700 combat vessels, and 300 air squadrons in 37 countries. The key to peace lies in this combined military strength of the free world, together with the greater measure of economic security provided by American assistance, according to proponents of foreign aid, who believe that we must maintain the cooperation and unity of the free world in order to be strong enough to resist Soviet aggression and expansion. As long as the free world stands with the United States, our strength consists of 75 per cent of the world's population. If the Soviet bloc could be extended to encompass the rest of the free world, including South America and the rest of North America, it would have 94 per cent of the world's population. Or, related to land area, we either have 65 per cent of the1 world on our side, or the Soviet bloc has 95 per cent on its side. It i.s argued, in the light of these figures, that failure to bind the free world countries together would tilt the advantage to the Communists. Even if West Germany's and NATO Europe's population, steel capacity, and coal fields were added to those of the Soviet bloc, the United States would be outweighed three to one in population, two to one in hard coal, and at least matched in crude steel production. Those who stress American dependence on the free world also point out the large per cent of our strategic materials which come from abroad. For example, 67 per cent of the bauxite, 100 per cent of the natural rubber. 100 per cent of the tin, 100 per cent of the industrial diamonds, 95 per cent of the manganese. 99 per cent of the chromitc. 95 per cent of the cobalt. 85 per cent of the platinum, etc. To the allegation that our foreign aid has not brought us friends and therefore has not been a cohesive force- for a stronger free world, proponents argue that our aid is an investment in strength and democracy, and that while foreign nations may differ sharply with us, it does not follow that they are unfriendly. They add that to require foreign political policies to be aligned with ours would defeat our i"Mntual Security Program" - Message from Ihe President of the United States (H. Doc. No. 358), March 19. 1956. Page 4 efforts to obtain goodwill and would be regarded as imperialism by other countries. The uncommitted people of the world would be thrown against us, they argue, if we demanded such alignment, pointing out how we would have felt in 1939 if Great Britain had demanded that we be actively with them or against them. In view of America's industrial advancement and its limited manpower, many people feel that America can make its best contribution to the free world defense through providing technical weapons and equipment and modern aid and naval power and leaving to our allies the responsibility of providing defensive ground forces and local naval and air power. This will discourage the small "brush-fire" wars and if they do break out, they will be fought without atomic weapons and can be more easily stopped. It is pointed out that the U. S. must maintain troops at all points contiguous to the Soviet bloc in order to prevent Soviet expansion and because \iiiciican manpower is limited, allied forces must be relied on to provide border guards. That Communist Russia realizes the restraint placed on her by free world cooperation and unity is shown by her current bid to provide the help needed by underdeveloped countries who are at present in the camp of the free world. This trend was pointed up by a recent editorial in the Northampton (Mass.) Daily Hampshire Gazette which stated, '. . . The Soviet Union has launched a foreign-aid program of its own, with the obvious intention of outdoing America in this effort and thus gaining world domination. "The President is not saying to Congress that foreign economic aid must continue forever. He is saying that the Sov let Union is now using all methods short of war to entice the underdeveloped nations into its embrace. He is saying that the cold war has become bitterly competitive and that unless the United States (wakes up) to its implications, we may lose the cold war itself." Walter Lippmann propounded the same theory when he recently wrote, "We have come to the end of the time when the- non-Communist world is willing or is compelled to look solely to Washington for economic aid. We are living in a time when almost all of the countries which have been receiving aid from us feel that we have a competitor in the Soviet Union, and that thev are now in a position to bargain with both of the two superpowers. ". . . We shall have to go on with foreign aid. For we cannot refuse to compete, leaving to the Soviet Union by default a monopoly in the under developed countries of South Asia and North Africa."2 Another argument of those favoring foreign aid is that the expanded exports from the U. S. are financed with our aid and that this export trade sustains high levels of employment within the United States. It was maintained by Harold Stassen, former administrator of foreign aid programs, that our foreign aid program assisted the U. S. in its post-Korean War economic readjustment by strengthening foreign economies whose financial crises abroad would have adversely al- fected our economy and by prov idhi? these foreign countries with the mean* of buying more U. S. exports, thereby strengthening our own economy, U. S. Representative John W. Hesel' ton of Massachusetts, stated on the floor of Congress that at the presefl] level of spending, foreign aid costs each citizen of the U. S. onlv $26 •' year and that the U. S. cannot allor" to discontinue such aid. In an article in the April issue <* Harper's Magazine, Peter F. Drueki'' appeals to his readers to considfl funds spent for foreign aid as an Sj penditure of self-interest insteW of "foreign aid." Regarding this jjj states, "In President Eisenhower's cufl rent proposal to put 'foreign aid' on I long-term basis we have made the f>r* step toward an effective policy. Fron"' nent groups, such as the Commit"' for Economic Development, are dj mantling sharp increases iii foreifl aid, especially to the Near East aJJ Asia. But much of this is still 'forci'-" aid,' still conceived as an answer bombs ai *ould be lng the Weapons velopmei mineral) reductior ^ould sti lls great, Jf ing us the teel w°uld m; 0ver the These "nlialanci •i higher "therwist ?"d capit !* expor ™yed in '"SCO,,tin, of Hi,, Comp ti Communist pressure rather thai basic- long-range American need i"1 self-interest." ( On a nationwide radio broaden* j Rep. Alvin Bentley of Michigan stat^ along this same line, "I have critici/';- 1 joroad, t kek beco, !"« as a, ?Pansion ,he early >-aid-£i *>t p £ttces ,,, ""I the o '"Oerican ^» aid ' N of that the ;"i,l servic the (foreign aid) program and I Wj continue to criticize parts of it. buM think if all foreign aid were just v» M1' out . . . the effects abroad would 1 very disastrous . . . the Commu'* would immediately be able to f>v run a large part of the free world m probably force us, in return, to '1° ARGUMENTS AGAINST FOREIGN AID On the other side, critics of Amfj can foreign aid programs argue ' the security of the United Stated of other free countries would 1"' creased if greater defense exenclit" (j were undertaken at home instead I in assistance to our allies. The) I that our security lies in the deteflj power of our atomic and hvil'"' ' ] Herald, VI-'"'1 >ld C SUch r,S|ihve Crr, S mn !>„i "il refr %n\ 0,,t > th* 1-5 n tht' a V -20 P "<•<■ II, "Washington Post and Tsnu 19S6. llullitiii uf America's Town Mcitiu I. uni. iiv 15, 1056. Facts Foitcxi News, June, s '■l.tl CsICi,,n Km1'" <*n,J■ b"t N> ' ;ir„, as N,,J,II': hC«ve '" Se8 Sp0b
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