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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
File 004
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 004. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/73.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 004. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/73

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 004, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/73.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript I ' The Case For and Against FOREIGN AID j ONE of the year's hottest election battles has already begun to rage on Capitol Hill and throughout the country. This is the legislative battle centering around President Eisenhower's request to Congress for an appropriation of S4.S60.0O0.000 for foreign aid - three billion dollars of this amount to be expended for military aid and the remainder for economic assistance. \\ itli a total of only $2,700,000,000 approved last year, the amount requested for this year would be an increase of almost 100 per cent. With many political and economic leaders throughout the country unalterably opposed to the very principle of foreign aid. the proponents and critics of tin- new foreign aid program proposed by the President have established themselves in opposing camps and have already begun skirmishing in the verbal combat which has every appearance of becoming the legislative fight of the decade. There is powerful opposition in both parties to not only the amount requested by the President but to the idea of a long range commitment of our government to support specific projects in foreign countries over a period of perhaps ten years and involving a total of approximately $100 million. This opposition was set off by the President's statement in his Budget Message that foreign aid laws should be revised "to assure greater continuity in providing economic assistance for development projects and programs which . . . require a period of years for planning and completion." Opposition to the yielding of year- to-year control over foreign aid dollars has been especially formidable in the Senate, and only slightly less so in the House, where appropriation bills must originate. With unexpended foreign Page 2 aid funds from previous appropriations totaling nearly -S4.5 billion, tin- scope ami size of the new proposal have many in a quandary. Close to a total of $50 billion has been made available to foreign countries, through grants and loans, since World War II, and main are asking il experience has proven this to be justified. There is much agreement that the foreign aid programs have been helpful in varying degrees, but in the light of changing domestic and world conditions many Feel that the time is at hand — in fact, long past — when we should reevaluate the effectiveness of our foreign aid policy since World War 11 and continue it only if it can be determined that the over-all results justify the continued drain on the taxpayers' pocketbooks and the threat to the economic security of the V. S., which the unbalanced budget constitutes. HISTORY OF FOREIGN AID The Lend-Lease programs, under which we supplied S47 billion of defense materials and services to our allies, was the first modern major American assistance program. It was followed by SS.7 billion expended for civilian supplies anil rehabilitation ol essential facilities to liberated and ex- enemv people during and after World War II. In the early period after the war, we contributed $3.4 billion to the International Bank lor Reconstruction and Development and to the International Monetary Fund, which was organized to remove restrictions on international trade. We provided a loan of close to SI billion to Britain to ease her severe international and internal economic difficulties in the belief that international economic relations throughout the world could not be reconstructed unless Britain were strong. Other countries received a total of -S1.3 bil lion toward the purchase ol surp'1". materials which our armed forces li;" left abroad, In 1947, the U. S. provided million in stop-gap assistance and " 1948 the first long-term program, ^ European Recovery Program km1*' commonly as the Marshall Plan. v»| put into effect and this involved ''' expenditure of around $11 bill' through 1951. Postwar reconstruction and recove. had been the aim of the foreign H programs until this time, but alter' outbreak of the Korean War, niiW'1 assistance became the dominant th^ of our aid programs. Of course, so" military assistance had been prOVl<l prior to the Korean War, a example, the aid to China in 1" and the aid to Greece and Tin*r strengthening them against Con*J nist guerrillas and Soviet aggress''^. The Mutual Defense Assistance-, of 1949 provided for the channeling, funds to the North Atlantic l"',, Organization. This was followed! the Mutual Security Act of >K which has been followed each ye*' similarly named acts. J Aid to underdeveloped conn1 had been accelerated by the P**fl of the Act for International Pe<*W ment in 195(1, and since the N0^ War the shift toward military I developmental assistance has be«» c-ompanied bv a redirection ot on' away from Western Europe, FrfSk start of 1953 to the middle ol L9S»| proportion of nonmilitary funds d j ed to areas outside of Enrol"' from 3,2% to 95%. Foreign aid programs ar istered by the Department ADMINISTRATION OF PROGR' through the semi-autonomous y national Cooperation Acbninist1' | and bv the Department of Ve Facts Foiuxi News, /«"*
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