Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
File 048
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 048. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/117.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 048. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/117

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 048, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/117.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 048
Transcript s of alcoholism, embezzlement, extravagance, sexual excesses, etc.). 6. Strict and continual financial control over all sums of money expended by the organization and over every penny of Party funds. 7. Special courses of instruction ' ' ' in the most elementary methods of illegal work and conspiracy must be conducted in the Party schools. 8. Police agents should be unmasked, by making their names known and publishing their photographs and descriptions of their persons in the press. 9. Direct action on the part of all the workers of the whole enterprise or of a given department so as to discover and forcibly eject all spies. 10. Every Communist Party should constantly hold in view the possibility of having to change quickly to illegal work and should take * * ° preparatory measures. 11. By altering the dwelling places of various comrades, the addresses and the places of meeting after arrests {pp. 48, 49). Included in this invaluable study for the guidance of Party members are the following rules established by a famous espionage school of the German general staff: Do not show too obvious curiosity when collecting news and doing reconnaissance. Train your facial expression so as to appear always uninterested and indifferent. Never discuss confidential matters in a coffee-house, on the tram, or in the train. Conceal your knowledge of foreign languages; this makes it easier for you to overhear conversations. Don't leave papers, envelopes, newspapers, hotel or business bills lying about anywhere. Don't throw them tn the waste paper basket either, even if they arc torn in small pieces {pp. 49, 50). Always arrange meetings with people from whom you intend to learn something at a great distance from your and their place of living. If possible they should have to make a railway journey of several hours to arrive at the meeting place. When tired, especially after a night journey, the client is less capable of offering resistance and is more ready to let things out. Rather learn five or six facts, even if they be insignificant ones than a hundred opinions {pp. 49, 50). Mr. Buchner's pamphlet lays down certain "rules of behavior" for Communist Party members in "executing confidential conspiratorial work:" He must always be on his guard, must never talk at random, never be guilty of carelessness; he must know how to govern himself and hold himself in check * * *. He must fight systematically against all distractions and tendencies to lose hold over himself, against talkativeness and curiosity. lie must evolve a number of strict rules of life for his daily exist- ence and his intercourse with men and affairs (p. 50). He is most specific in his directives for the behavior of Communist operatives: 1. Tell him who ought to know what you have to say, not he who is permitted to know it. 2. A revolutionary must not talk at random or use superfluous words. * ° * 3. Only ask what it is your concern to know. 4. Be on your guard in telephoning and letter-writing. * * * 5. Don't take unnecessary things with you. 6. Look around you. See who is following you and who is watching you. 7. Don't pose. Don't attract attention by acting the conspirator; act and behave simply. 8. Avoid all frivolity and care-free behavior. Consider every step and every action. 9. Adapt your way of life to the environment in which you belong according to the documents you carry (pp. 50, 51). Mkthods of Evasion and Deception Many Americans are inclined to minimize the resourcefulness and the cunning of the Communist fifth column. Page 46 Many, having little substantial knowledge of the nature of this conspiracy, inclined to accept the CPUSA as just another American political party, are misled by its claims, It would lie well, therefore, to present an analysis of typical Communist methods of evasion and deception. Communists customarily resort to double talk and what has aptly been described as Aesopian language, in other words, language intended to give' one impression to this pi< underrr, flow Cl trusted frankly tion of the wot Now the outsider and quite another to Party insiders. While as t|](, ^ they constantly assure the Soviet Union and their asso ciates in the United States of their loyalty to the Soviel cause, they seek to give the impression to Americans tha they are simultaneously loyal to this country. The 194! constitution of the CPUSA declares that the "Communis Party carries forward [a phrase added to offset any inipres sion of complete endorsement] the democratic traditions o: America Jefferson, Paine and Lincoln." The very same documen l,,,!,] ^ declares that — The Communist Party of the United Stairs is the party ° " " basing itself upon the principles of ° ' ism-Leninism. political •Marx- the free true fro Hie sate these ac fceless i •nent of their op, repress In o which calls for the establishment of a dictatorship by fore t » anil violence iii direct contradiction to the principles ffl K, which Jefferson, Paine and Lincoln stood. ]](, . The preamble to the 1945 Party constitution says "Th k Communist Party upholds the achievements of America E democracy." The weasel word here is, of course, "achieVl E ments." As William '/.. Foster puts it in his 23 Questio* L s !'"' About the Communis! Party, "We stand second to nnnci of ,., our loyalty to the American people." Since the Party Ivy i"j, own claim represents the American people this is a pled; of loyalty to itself. The Party here does not pledge its to support tlie institutions of American democracy as th are today. Nor is this implied in the pledge "to defei ' ° ° the democracy of our country." The reference "tnir country" is particularly presumptuous in tlie light Questions, William Z. Foster openly claims that "Social' f ' democracy, which is what prevails in the USSR, is on ^.. higher plane than the democracy of ° ° ° the Unifl j" 'in^ States." BVed ^ Article 11 of the Party constitution carries the pic"! |rar j. to "extend the democracy of our country." This term is fji j. common one in Communist literature. It is simply an * e mission that the "limited democracy" remaining in government according to William Z. Foster, is to "extended" and exploited to the full to further the aib'i of communism. Rs men "Pper re The i Mire tl Qscow'i Itermin '"n anil the many previous allusions by Communist spokesmen j* , the "Soviet fatherland" and the Party's demonstrated al L inileviating loyalty to Soviet policy. In fact, in his < ^ 'aims that the USSR Again to mislead the unwary, the preamble purW certain phrases from our own Declaration of lndcpe" titj nice, demanding the right to "life, liberty and the puts ol happiness," calmly ignoring the known fact that the of millions in Communist countries is to lie denied tl" elementary rights. Article II presents the Party's purpose "to promote best interests and welfare of the working class and people of the United States." Naturally the Party, t described as the "political party of the American WOP nieasn Klenz. I "USA a 16 Daily V<'S vv it e of tl <T oat Now, I 'ntiTnat: cb'sci issir National. *rite th °omrade solution ,—e articli flhheDis si 111 class," assumes for itself the right to define what are tl*%ist [nl "best interests and welfare." |1 CPUS The preamble declares that the Party vvill defend ', In Sep "United States Constitution and its Bill of Rights a#" ""liiiunis its reactionary enemies." Since the Communists dollinthe. consider themselves as reactionaries, but as progress!* '"'il ol tl Ivi is Fobum News, June, 'i is !■'<
File Name uhlib_1352973_v005_n006_048.jpg