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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 045. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/114.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 045. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/114

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 045, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/114.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 045
Transcript i. tv"'1;1' Comma* an Cm''. ,,tition °t American party with authority and wisdom" (p. 88). He insists that the CPUSA "can derive deep satisfaction from the fact that it unfailingly received brotherly advice anil guidance from the Communist International." And he defiantly adds that "The leading role of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in the Comintern needs neither explanation nor apology" (ibid., p. 71). He goes on to voice the feeling of pride with which the American party views the fact that it is part of "a world party together with the glorious Party of the Soviet Union" will that this world party "is daily guided by such proved leaders as Manttilsky, Kuusinen * " ' Piatnitsky" — all prominent leaders of the Russian Communist Party (ibid., P. 92). Climaxing his panegyric, Bittelman declares: In the fifteen years ol its existence the Comintern has grown into a true world partv. It has reached the high state where all "Communist Parties are carrying out one single line of tbe Comintern," a stage where all "Communist Parties are united by the Executive Committee of the Communist Internationa] into a single centralized World Party • * *." (Piatnitsky, Speech at the 'thirteenth Plenum of the Executive Committee of the Communist International) (ibid., p. 92). Pointing out that the existence of this "world party" of Wlich the \merican party is an organic part, makes possible the formulation of a "world revolutionary strategy," '"' adds that "it i.s in Comrade Stalin, since Lenin's death, "•at this strategy has found the greatest formulator, inter- peter, and organizer." In demonstrating the complete subservience of the "Olerican party to Moscow, Mr. Bittelman is not content ,0 present his case in broad, general terms. He is most sI)'iilii in itemizing the nature of Kremlin intervention "' detail. When the American Communist movement was first '"I'nli'il in 1919, it consisted of two rival groups: the jj°rnmunist Party of America and the Communist Labor aty of America. Bittelman describes the Comintern's role " this founding stage: The bringing together of all American revolution,iry workers Into one Communis! Party ° ° ° was the first of the more significant aets of advice of the Comintern * * * A unified and single Communis! Party was materialized in the United States '" shorter time, less painfully and wastefully, than could have been the case without the advice and assistance of the Com,*,, t tern (ibid., pp. 74, 75). ,."s. according to Bittelman, is the first milestone in the ^ory of the CPUSA. |. '' i'om 1919 to 1922, for example, the Communist Party, (( V was illegal. Bittelman outlines the nature of Mos- ^ s advice and guidance in evading the law, as follows: Once re the American Communists consulted with the (:"""' ist International. This was in 1921-11)22. Anil the '"■nit advice came, as it was bound to ° * * Illegal work, ''■it is. revolutionary work that could not he done openly because ol governmental persecution, was not abandoned '"I continued; the illegal work supplementing the legal, and Vice versa ' ' ° Whal was it that proved especially helpful for the Ameri- immunists in the Comintern advice on legal and illegal lllrk.J It was the world and Russian experience of Bolshevism Ul>id., p. 76). l ■'* major concern of the CPUSA is the task of boring >i/-: t( "" within the labor movement. Mere again the Comin- oi '*i actively intervened, according to Bittelman: , 'he next milestone in the Con,intern leadership for the ','Ml'rican Party we find on the quest,, I trade-union work .. It was the Comintern advice and guidance that helped ' nerican Co unists to turn full face to the building il belt Wing in the reformist unions beginning with 192(1; it was the advice of the Comintern that helped ° * ° formulate strike policies and tactics; it was Comintern advice on how to revolutionize the labor movement ° " ° (ibid., pp. 77, 97). According to Bittelman, the directives of the Communist International extended to the point of advising a polity (which is still in force) calling for the establishment of an independent Negro republic in what he called the Black Belt in the South, a step which would involve armed insurrection against the United States in which countless Negro lives would be sacrificed to the machinations of Moscow. Here are Bittelman's own words on the subject: Once more came the "outside" influence of the Comintern; and what did it say? It said that * * ' in the Black Belt the full realization of this demand (for national liberation) requires the fight for the national .self-determination of the Negroes including the right of separation from the United State and the organization of an independent state (ibid., p. 85). It has been pointed out that in the early 19.30's the Communists advocated measures for so-called unemployment relief which were jacked up to tlie point where their acceptance would have meant national bankruptcy. In support of these demands embodied in the Lundeen bill, the Communists promoted hunger marches calculated to incite the unemployed against the government. In a number of cases, state legislative chambers were occupied and vandalized and numerous instances of violence developed. Where did the inspiration for this program come from? Bittelman gives the answer: the Comintern undertook to prepare the proletarian vanguard, the Communist Party, and through it the whole working class for effective struggle against unemployment. The Communist Party, guided by the Comintern, eventually succeeded in making this demand ° * ° a major issue in the class struggle of the United States (ibid., p. 87). Referring to the ouster of Jay Lovestone, former gen- Joy Lovestone, who told the Dies Committee in 1939 that he was ousted as General Secretary of the Communist Party by Josef Stalin in 1929 because of a "violent" conflict with Moscow over how the various units of the party should be led. WIDB WORLD PHOTO era] secretary of the CPUSA and his followers, Bittelman calls attention to the advice of the Con,inter,, in ° D ° cleansing itself of the l.o\rsto,,e opportunists and the conciliators with the advice of Joseph Stalin (ibid., pp. 88, 89). Thus, according to Moscow's leading apologist and spokesman within the American partv, the Communist International with headquarters in Moscow, actively intervened in the affairs of the Communist Party of (he United Slates he following major issues: (1) the founding of i ' \i Is f OBI vi Xi'v h 1956 Page 43
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