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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
File 044
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 044. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/113.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 044. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/113

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 044, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/113.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 044
Transcript tried to copy in detail everything the Bolsheviks advocated, in order to apply it to the United States. His sensitive nose was always pointed in Moscow's direction [1 Confess (I3ut- ton), p. 191]. As the managing editor of the Daily Worker, Louis F. Budenz was in a position which demanded daily and hourly decisions on Party policy. He described the manner in which the Party's official mouthpiece was overseered by Bittelman, to whom he referred as "the chief of the small corps of politburo members who were in touch with the Comintern representatives and the Soviet consulates." The special role played by Bittelman, according to Budenz, was as "the agent entrusted by Moscow with instructing the Party leaders in the precise terms to be employed in the use of Aesopian language," namely language which, for purposes of legal evasion, could be interpreted in one way for public consumption and in quite another way within the Party ranks. "Many times," declared Budenz, "I heard him lecturing the Politburo on exactly what words and phrases the Party declarations should contain in order to be Leninist and at the same time legal." The actual procedure followed in editing the Communist Daily Worker finds few parallels in the history of American journalism. It should be particularly shocking to those who hold that the Communist Party represents a segment of American political opinion rather than a supine echo of Moscow. Mr. Budenz described his editorial experiences with Bittelman in 1936: Bittelman was then operating from the Hotel Albert, where the entire editorial board conferred with him almost every day. So carefully were his whereabouts and movements guarded, and so carefully did he seek to conceal our conferences, that each meeting with him had to be arranged over an outside telephone * ° ° Every day at noon, Harry Gannes, then foreign editor of the Daily Wtrrker, a veteran member of the board, would rise from his desk and leave the building. In a few minutes he would return, to state generally that he had reached "Comrade Barnes" and that he would see us at such and such a time. At the hour set, each member of the Daily Worker editorial hoard would stroll over to the Hotel Albert. Singly rath would enter the lobby and then go up to Bittelman's room tor a hurried hour on the paper's editorial policy. Bittel- in.ui-Barnes was the law and the line; particularly did he take pains to stress tin exact manner in which a fundamental position should be presented [Men Without Faces by Louis F. Budenz (Harper), pp. 79, 80]. It would seem that Alexander Bittelman, who has frankly declared that he would not fight against the Soviet Union "in any war" because "any war against the Soviet Union would be an unjust war," has been singled out by the powers that be as the chief carrier and guardian of the sacred fire of Russian Bolshevism within the American party. He has also served as the Party's official historian for the past two decades delineating in full the decisive role of the Soviet-dominated Communist International in every phase of the activity of the American party from its very inception. On the occasion of the 15th anniversary of the Communist Party of the United States in 1934, Bittelman wrote his pamphlet, Fifteen Years of the Conununist Party, where he outlines the origin of the American party as follows: Nineteen hundred and nineteen was the year when our Partv was formed ° ° ° Nineteen hundred and nineteen was tlie year when the Conununist International was formed, preceding the formation of our Party hy about five months. Our Party became part of it * ° ° But it was only through the costly experiences of the first World War, and especially the vietory of the proletarian revolution in Russia under the leadership of the Bolshev iks, that the proletarian vanguard of Page 42 According to Alexander Bittelman, right, executive committee member of CPUSA since its inception and from lime to time editor of The Communist, now known as Political AHairs, Communist International policy, still in force, calls for establishment of an independent Negro republic in "the Black Belt in the South," a step which would involve armed insurrection against the United States in which countless Negro lives would be sacrificed to the machinations of Moscow. wmr vvom.D photo the United States came to realize that the Bolshevik way is the onlv way lor the liberation of the American proletariat and all the exploited and oppressed. Thus it came to pass that our Party came into existence. ° ° ° Throughout his works, Bittelman stresses the role j the Communist Party of the Soviet Union as a model .W guide for the CPUSA. In his Communist Party in ActU\ lor example, he points out to members of his Party: It is, of course, impossible to say which particular experience in the (lass Struggle vvas decisive tor your joining the <'on nist Party. Bather it must have been the su I many experiences on various points of the class-struggle front, among which the fight against imperialist war and for the defense ot the Soviet Union had undoubtedly played a very meat part in bringing vou into the ranks of the Party. This M the ease with many workers who join the Conununist Party because it is the onlv- Party that is following in the footstep* of Lenin and the Bolsheviks, that is, organizing the American proletariat to follow the example of the working el.es el Russia led by the Communist I Bolshevik) Partv- (p. 4). Again in the same pamphlet he frankly admits: These Socialist successes of the Soviet Union, achieved under the leadership ot the C munis! (Bolshevik) Party- have undoubtedly had a great influence in bringing you in!" the ranks of the American jvarty. Now you must try to gain a clearer and more thorough understanding ol the international role of Bolshevism and of the Bolshevik Party (p. 14)' In his later work entitled Milestones in the HiStOtK lite Communist Party, published in 1937 on the occafl of the American party's 18th anniversary, Bittelman bl"" states: The Communist International, and its model party —n** C miist Party of the Soviet Union — headed by C rad* Stalin, gave ns the guidance that helped the American t'111"'. niunists to find the Way to tin masses and to the position (1 vanguard (p. 8). ., In answer to (hose who charge that the policies of j American partv ire dictated by Moscow, BittelmaoJ only admits the intervention of Stalin's puppet orgaOJ tion. the Communist International, in the allairs ol "j? CPUSA, but actually glories therein. "The Comintern I inlia lore,' " boasts Bittelman in the same pamphlet, ''.']' can be no doubt of that. Anil it is fortunate that it o^ He points out moreover that "the Comintern spoke ' F ii h I "i.i vi \i w s, June, AiniTiY insists | the lac guiil.mi antlv a, of the S ation in He, Anien'c; Partv ti and tha leaders Protnini P-92). Clin In thi into ;i all "C Comii by tin into ; Speec of the Poin Hicl, I s'ble tin °e adds *at this Prefer, a In d America to prese sPecific "> detail . Whe funded Ponimui P->rtv of « tin's I, The 1, into ot nifiean single in shoi bei n il TV™'' ""story ,, tjsFr ■v. Wi Ks ad On, ^"iiiiui correct that is becaus, 'mt coi Wee ve Wl, '-in Co (vork? | (ibid., L A ma b -"i rn acti,
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