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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 040. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/109.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 040. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/109

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 040, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/109.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 040
Transcript there has been developed a compromise solution, based on the idea that compulsory integration is as unconstitutional as compulsory segregation. Governor Folsom has signed a legislative act which paves the way for a general election this summer to approve a proposed state amendment which would give students and their parents a three-way choice of schools, based on their individual conviction eind preference. Before the start of each school year, every prospective student would apply for admission, signifying his choice of segregated (all Negro or all white) or integrated classes. Local school boards would then provide one or more schools for mixed enrollment, according to the expressed need. According to the sponsor of the measure. State Representative N. S. Hare, "The Court didn't say there must be forced integration; it simply said there can be no compulsory segregation. Who can complain if he is given what he has freely chosen?" A decided stimulus to the cause of interposition is the "Declaration of Constitutional Principles," a manifesto signed by nineteen senators and eighty-one representatives, representing eleven states, and presented to both houses of Congress on March 12. This document, containing the statements and convictions of the Southern states most gravely affected, closes xvith this pledge: We pledge ourselves to use all lawful means to hring ahoeet a reversal of this ilecision which is contrary to the Constitution, and to prevent the use of force in its itiipleine-ntation. In this trying period, as we all seek to right this wrong, we appeal to our people not to he provoked hy the agitators and troublemakers invading our states and to scrupulously refrain from disorder and lawless acts.14 Reactions to the presentation of this document, of course, were widely divergent, but all congressmen seemed to agree that it created a very grave, historic situation. The plea from both sides was that representatives from all areas of the nation, leaders of all points of view, sit down together and try to solve the problem by reasoned discussion, rather than to appeal to aroused passions ancl emotions. The issue over interposition and its quest to restore states' rights has aroused new interest in the report by the Commission in Intergovernmental Relations, which was presented to President Eisenhower in 1955 for transmission to Congress. There has been little publicity given this survey up to the present, but in the light of recent events it is now receiving considerable attention, for its recommen- ""Declaration of Constitutional Prim ; -tonal Record, March 12, 1956, pp. 3948 .mil -1004. Page 38 dations criticize centralized government, bureau controls, overlapping taxes, and urge renewal of states' rights under the Constitution. Significantly, this commission was composed of members not only from the South but also from Northern, Eastern, and Western states, evidence that states' rights has become more than a regional problem. Whatever the outcome of the attempted use of interposition in the fight for segregation anel for the recognition of claimed states' rights, the attention of the nation will be increas ingly focused on the pros ancl coiH generalities ancl technicalities of th< method in months to come, as the election year gains momentum. N" politic-ell aspirant can afford to dodg^ the issue. Platforms are being screen] in minute detail to ascertain the amount of aid to interposition a city county, state, or the nation might reasonably expect from candidates '° many offices. Not since the time of tW Civil War, or War Between the' State* has the spotlight been upon these issues in such magnitude. The hour1* indeed hisoric. E1" Varied Views on Interposition In Marbury v. Madison, decided in 1803, there was established the authority and the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court to determine for all Americans, Irrespective of color, race, and creed, equality of rights under the Constitution. The supremacy of the Supreme Court in passing on constitutional questions was determined by that decision. .... I say again today that the doctrine of interposition means nothing but nullification, and it means really a determination on the part of certain forces in this country to put themselves above the Supreme Court and above the Constitution. Senator Wayne Morse (D-Ore.) Whether you happen to approve or disapprove of segregation as a personal matter is of no concern. Those whose honest beliefs may be against segregation have lost just as much by the Court's decision as those who favor it. The preservation of liberty through an honest and conscientious interpretation oi the Constitution by the Court transcends all other consideration of personal likes or dislikes. If the Court interprets the Constitution according to its own notion of what the law ought to be, rather than what the law is. we no longer have a government of laws, but oi men. If the Court can disregard the ("(institution today to accomplish a result of which you approve, it likewise can ignore it tomorrow to reach a result of which you disapprove. Constitutional government as we heretofore have known it and the philosophy upon which tin's decision was based are incompatible, and so long as it stands, the liberties and heritage of freedom which we so zealously cherish in both the North and South are in great jeopardy. Eugene Cook, Attorney General of Georgia Since the situation involves racial relations, the South is faced with adverse public opinion from other sections of the country where the percentage of Negro population is not an important factor. In this circumstance, the constitutional question of state sovereignty is being adversely publicized, What is now most urgently needed is a challenge of federal usurpation on ground where the matter of state sovereignty touches all members of the compact of Union. There are a multitude of these where opposition to federal usurpations may be urged effectively. L. E. Whitney, in "An Open Letter to Certain Members oi Congress" The issue of segregation and desegrei?' tion is within the jurisdiction and the i',*Pl'j sibiltty of the Supreme Court of the Unitjj States and the judicial process. I am pleS^ that it has been handled by the courtsj nu displeased that it has become the of passion, emotion, bitterness, and antw onism. . The principle of federalism leaves *j room for nullification, and it leaves no rOJJ lor interposition. Interposition fully oped becomes nullification, as the courts our country have stated again and nff'L and as the great, historic leaders ™J| nation have stated. Nullification is tion of the Constitution. It cannot I doned. > Senator Hubert II. IlrMr"1 (D-Minn.) Desperate men in positions of leadgj arc openly advocating defiance to the ''*,% and to the supreme law of the lain the other extreme, men flushed with vU-'1^ in courts are seeking to substitute tot'fC^ for concord between the races in the S^ The great mass of moderates which conipu pro!.ably more than 95 per cent of l>ot"J races in the South arc strangely silt' inactive, while the extremists in botl are rapidly destroying the good wil I > understanding of both races, which ^ been built up through men of bn>thyr'Vf" and good will in positions of leadership ^ Ing tin decades which have followed Civil War. j Judge Fred H- ' Charlotte. N. G To me this issue really is not primaWjB of law and its interpretation, nor is it &™M preserving traditions in the South th^j nave been controlling over many g*J tions. The real issue Involved is <1,ir. ,r? ception of mankind in these modern f*S our recognition that our goveniuii'j1' m conceived and brought into being \°:,w ».£-*.. 1 ....„..:..„ ,.i' *!,,. IrtdlWS the tad*. compose our p(,P". ^i thai Individual 'll, | safety and protection ol human beings who and our conviction beings arc not meant to be pawns l^|f, state, oor are they meant to be expl°''t,/ the strong simply because they arc v*r<i I cannot resist. . „ J We arc presented with the <l'l,",1U(,i' whether citizenship, which is guarau'* J' all our people by the Fourteenth •*' I ment. can be divided so as to result n and second-class citizens. ... ft \s a member of the Committee °£jM eign Relations of the United States ■' ,.i;' and one who has traveled widely ' ftp especially in the Far East, where J skinned people are in overwhelming ,-()ry ' ity, I feel the problem which is W le \l June, '"'.In, of'., ■ '< spy j "I r p, jlfe fSsrs .„ "s|it.,t„, I!, ""t'.l 1 s'«riri, He, (D- Iii prove Kef"1
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