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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
File 033
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 033. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/102.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 033. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/102

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 033, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/102.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 033
Transcript I'M GEORGE... ,-;"■"' ""tv',5 I .fori ,iit>. V on is J- der *\ be tn»J erica nk I'm the Guy You Let Do It! M REALLY beginning to run your country — your state, your county and your town, too! You don't like that, do you? But haven't you been saying, "I haven't got the time. Let George do it?" So . . . I'm doing it. As long as vein ele> nothing more ''Wil complain, I'm sitting pretty. The °nly thing that will ever get rid of me ■"id the political gang I control is for C°u who call yourselves real Americans to start running your own gox- *nment. Von talk a lot about sclf- SOVernment, but most of it i.s just so '""eh talk. Almost 50 per cent of foil didn't even bother tei vote at the '•1st presidential election. You even let "fiy machine pick your candidates for Vou __ right from the- top down to J0|u' precinct captains. Do you call 'ut self-government? ,. Do you wonder why SO many pub- I1-' officials are corrupt? Don't you now why so many crooks, grafters '"d other criminals receive little or no Punishment from the courts? It i.s ^""I'le - the crooks are part of my ^'l(-'hine. and my machine elects or WPoints the judges. No one ever bites '"e hand that feeds him! ,,'on max not realize it, but I paved ,nc' Wax for Stalin, Hitler, Mussolini incl all the- rest eil the big shots. You n°H' how 1 did it - by getting the '""'I people tei take care of then «elv, (,s and the bad bens tei take care everybody else. That's the easiest wax tei mess up any government. Remember what Edmund Burke said: "The only thing necessary lor the triumph eif evil i.s that good men elo nothing!" I'm sure glad you're letting me handle things for you. Why not! You don't have to worry your heads over things like resolutions, hills, proposed amendments, writing letters to congressmen, Just lceive it to me. 1 study all of those things, and nix1 hoys see that the congressmen get plenty eif mail — the right kind of mail. Frankly, I don't see why you need worry about registering or paying poll taxes. Most of you probably wont anyhow. But then, most of vein jug- heads don't even know your Constitution! That's ;i scrap of paper made for the horse' and buggy days. Just you keep living in your fairy-tale constitutional dream world. Anel while you're floating along on those sale little clouds, we'll bring the Constitution up to date for you. (Hal I 1 know what I want — I'm George! I'm quite countryl a guy I'm running this KM) Food for Fighting (Continued from Page 20) ij 'Se of permanent transportation tie- However, the' Department of 'i!!;. Hfcj'pulture is aware' of this problem, VH| 's "Considering the selection of less fyji??rable locations — locations which it, °e suitable lor civil defense needs l'""'i'geneies. ■i' j"n defense prep.nations we have , *d to take iiiio account the penna- ■ ee of the damage that would re- '". "thefi, l& V\\t.i i---i ...-—..». K '' to take into account the perma- iil],t11' "f the damage that would re- - ''o,n an H-bomb attack. If 60 per "1 on,- industry were knocked out V'° "rsf attack, it would bo knocked ^(Permanently. Not only would the tii-s")"1'>'- destroy factories and I'acili- \\\t tniV """''l knock out the t||t>. s. that make the machines for (' factories and facilities. Anel, fur- 's Fom xi \, ws. .Iiiiic. 1956 llier, the- same- bombs would demolish the shops that tool such plants, and they would put out eif commission the foundries and steel mills that handle the1 raw metal leir the tools. In many eases the- rebuilding job would have to start right down at the raw metal level. There' is senne storage eil industrial tools in our civil defense effort. This program should be encouraged. At the same time we should consider that we would not be able to work with the tools in storage unless we had food te) eat and warm clothing to wear. II we hail lo divide our time between "scrounging" for food and burying those who couldn't scrounge quite Bard enough, we would never get around to using the' teiols. \\Y would be caught in a cruel circle of poverty — our hands tied in the' pro duction of the elemental commodities for survival. It should follow, then, that it is essential to our individual and national survival that xvc have ample stocks eif these elemental commodities stored, both on an individual family level and on a national and community level. One of the best moves in the interest of national defense that our federal government could possibly make would be to turn the farm surplus pile over tei the civil defense administrator for distribution to every community and every home in the nation. Actually, it is on the home and neighborhood level that these stocks will he needed in the event of a national catastrophe. Especially should these items be stored in those areas that are not high priority targets fen the enemy. It is to these areas theit we will have to evacuate millions of out- civilian population if there is ever an attack or even a direct threat of em attack. Of course, not all the commodities in the .surplus pile would lend themselves to storage for civil defense. Many would, however — perhaps enough te> eliminate the surplus problem if these stocks were turned over for this purpose. A good deal of the cotton surplus, for example, could go to making bandages, sheets, sheet blankets, clothing, ancl even tents to be stiiied in every community lor civil defense. Freed of the surplus problem, the Department of Agriculture could devote itself more fully to research on processing and storage techniques. Commodities that we don't know how to steire now might have future Strategic storage value. One bright aspect regarding the entire situation i.s that in the supply of farm products and other essential consumer goods we have a tremendous advantage over our potential enemies. The Russians are' catching up in many phases of armament ancl industrial production, but the one area where they seem incapable of overtaking us is in farm production. It seems that a farmer must remain free in order tee produce. The Russian farmers resisted collectivization from the beginning. Many of them slaughtered their livestock rather than turn it oxer to the state. Bulganin isn't lee-ding his people- as well with c-onununized farms as Tsar Nicholas did vv ith the downtrodden peasants. If we- will recognize the food front now. while we've- got one that is recognizable, and enter into a program of strategic storage eif agricultural products anil other consumer goods lor sur- v iveil. we will be doing much towards keeping our farmers free now and insuring our own future freedom. END Page 31
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