Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
File 054
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 054. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1313.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 054. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1313

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 054, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1313.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 054
Transcript MMMm ■■ "unifier of peoples," "the great military leader of modern times," "greatest strategist of our era," "symbol of heroism and glory," and so on. On a smaller scale the same atmosphere of slavish adulation permeates the national committee of the Communist Partv, USA. Testimony to this effect comes from William Z. Foster, himself, the Party's chairman. In his article in Political Affairs for September, 1945, Foster states frankly: With his great personal prestige and his excessive degree of authority, Browder's word had become practically the law in emr Party ° ° ° He had grown almost into a dictator. His authority reached such a point that his word had become virtually unchallengeable in our Party. His policies and writings finally were accepted almost uncritically by the leaders and the general membership. Browder created around himself an atmosphere of infallibility and unchallengeable authority. All this was accentuated by the deluge of petty- bourgeois adulation, praise-mongering and hero-worship that was constantly poured upon him by our leadership and our members ° ° °. Constantly grasping for more power, Comrade Browder had largely liquidated the political functions of the Party's leading bodies. He habitually by-passed the National Board in policy-making ° " °. The National Committee also had gradually lost all real political power. It assembled; it listened to Browder's proposals; it affirmed them; and it dispersed to the districts to impress the policy upon tbe membership. Of genuine political discussion there was none whatever in the National Committee. Similarly, our recent National Conventions were hardly better than the National Committee meetings — with their formal endorsement of Browder's reports, no political elise nssions and no self-critical examination of the leadership ° * *. In this stifling bureaucratic atmosphere ° » ° political thinking itself was hamstrung. Comrade Browder, basing hieiise-lf upon the high prestige which he enjoyed among the Partv membership, made policy pretty much as he saw fit. Of course, Foster strives to create the impression that Earl Browder was individually at fault for this state of affairs, \owhere does he admit that the atmosphere he describes is typical. The fact remains that although Browder was general secretary from 1930 to 1945 with the knowledge and approval of his Moscow superiors, Foster, who had been loud in praise of Browder's "insight and vision," hailing him as the "heroic leader of the people," did not dare to change his tune publicly until 1945 after the French Communist leader, Jacques Duclos, hail damned Browder in the name of the international Communist hierarchy. Following the ejection of Browder, Foster was quick to pay his homage to his successor, Eugene Dennis, quoting him with deepest respect. Dennis, according to Foster in the Daily Worker of May 15, 1950, "symbolizes the just cause of peace, democracy, and socialism" and is singled out as "the foremost leader of our Party." Spimt of Prevailing Fear The truth is that the same Communist leaders who are the personification of defiance before congressional committees and the courts of the land, who pour a steady stream of vilification upon representatives of the American government, are paralyzed with fear he-fore the emissaries of the Soviet dictatorship. In the September, 1945, issue of Political Affairs, Foster openly admitted that the chairman of the Party would have faced expulsion had he made public his letter to the national committee of January, 1914, in which he dared to take issue with Browder, then the current Moscow favorite. In the Communist of April, 1944, Foster's views were- openly castigated before the entire Party by Gerhard Eisler, an alien. Foster submitted meekly and without Page 52 protest, simply because Eisler possessed the blessing Moscow. It is indeed hard to reconcile the rebellious fire-eater « the Daily Worker and of congressional committees' heal ings with the submissive Mr. Foster before his Moscol superiors. Speaking in Foster's presence before the Ameri can commission of the Executive Committee of the Coi" munist International on May 6, 1929, Joseph Stalin \va unsparing in his eastigation of his American gauleitff We quote his speech in part: The Foster group wants to display its loyalty to the CPSU (Communist Party of the- Soviet Union) and proclaims itself as "Stalinites." Goeid and well. ° ° ° The Foster group wants to demonstrate its closeness to the Comintern. ° ° * Good and well. 6 * ° Let the Muscovites know how we Americans can play on the Exchange. • • • But Comrades, the Comintern is not an Exchange. The Comintern is the holy of holies of the working class. The Comintern must, therefore, not be taken for an Exchange. ° ° * It is characteristic that in writing to his friends, Comrade Foster refers to that conversation as something mysterious, as something about which one must not speak aloud. ° ° * What could there be so mysterious in my conversations with Comrade Foster? ° ° ° What eliel Foster speak to me about? He complained m the factionalism and unprincipled character eif Comrade Lovestone-'s group. " ° ° I admitted that Comrade Love- stone's group is guilty of these- digressions. ° ° " From this, Comrade Foster comes to tbe strange conclusion that I sympathize with the [Foster] minority green]-), ° ° ° Is it not clear that that which Cemnaele- Foster WISHES, se-e-ins to him to be REALITY? How did Mr. Foster, a free-born American, react to W humiliating dressing-down from a foreign potenta"' There is no trace of any reply to this tirade by Mr. F°s'f, His attitude toward Joseph Stalin was, however, clear expressed in answe-r to a government question in c-onn^ tion with the trial of the eleven Communist leaders a" Eugene Dennis (left,, embraces Benjamin Davis, former New Y°r, . i councilman and convicted Communist leader, at Pennsylvania Sr^r j New York City upon Davis' completion of a sixty day contempt se ,flef last year in Pittsburgh. Dennis (termed by William Z. Foster as "tnC tf most leader of our party" and Davis were among Communist leodef (.. victed in 1949 for conspiring to advocate the forceful overthrow c' * U. S. government. Both were released in March, 1955, after serving four months. J Facts Forum News, May, "as pul S('pte-llll ent anel at the S "ational To preile-t. aelelr.--. to vein and o People- tovv.ere leader love. ° tin- Bo with c The . O e> always mill iei He- re] I vv joined such a J" fact t Nad tl > pov [°ster Ik > con ftoice sa toge .;. One Politica eov.r-i ''<!!> in, has nut Pre, "tisines Pe-ae-e- - And a „ln his N at taft, el raise U] twurgec '" his i levities Pved Gc K the ,1 '" ■ N ■'(le-,,,1, 1 ca ""Hy U talked I,"' "'" '•ithaw. "'<■.!,!„ I,K Picl Paper". *" bee '■'">. B '"'>'■ of *»>'.an, • Mllv g ■>'l le -ell. - I ,11
File Name uhlib_1352973_v005_n005_054.jpg