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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
File 049
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 049. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1308.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 049. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1308

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 049, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1308.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 049
Transcript for am id coM the <'""' nlunist Party makes it an active practice to colonize ke-y Industrial plants with aggressive, often college-trained Communists who have been thoroughly indoctrinated and Prepared in party-training schools. The presence of one S|,el, troublemaker in a large- establishment can be the source- of considerable turmoil. Operating secretly within a given plant to avoid detection, the Party member receives every possible outside aid through what is known as "concentration," defined by J- Peters as the utilization of "all available forces and Organizations to penetrate the selected factory." Distribution of the Daily Worker, of leaflets, open-air meetings at the factory gate, are all handled by Party members on the Outside, housewives, students, etc. Leading party members are assigned to advise those who are inside. Front organizations supplement their efforts. J. Peters, signing himself |. P., stressed the importance of this task in the forty Organizer for February, 1933, as follows: thai District anel Section Committees must consider their first political responsibility tei those- units which are- e-eiiiie-n- li-ate-d on the important plants. This means that all the Problems, in (he- concentration work, must In- take-n up in •'ie respective ci iltiv, a cle-ar line- of policy developed ° comrades should he- assigned to help the- units tei earry "ii th,- work. ° ' ° 't is incumbent upon tin- Communists operating inside .'"' plant to exploit "even the most elementary grievances '" 'I"- shop" anil develop "partial struggles around these '"''Hands." These- struggles, strike's, etc.. are not to be ."""eel to the- particular plant but must he broadened to jOvolve other plants and to involve the workers in con- lc't with the police anil tin- government generally. 'In- Communist cell also functions as a source of inlor- '''tinii for Soviet military intelligence. In the- same- issue ' tin- Party Organizer, F. B. or Fred Brown, alias for ' I1', an agent of the Communist International, is most '"'cilic- on this point: An immediate task for tlie shop nuclei, lor individual ■"ty members working in shops, metal plants, chemical faeries, shipyards, em the- waterfront, is to ke-e-p theii eyes ''i1'" .mil se'e' what is being shipped, what steps are- being 'ken by the' bosses for (he- transformation of the industry into . uar industry. " ° ° Real efforts must he- made to stop the "P'lie-nt eel ammunition. ,, ' 's of more than passing significance in this connection , "'t the man who was promoted to the small ruling seen- I, at position of national secretary of tin- Communist E5v, USA, is none- other than Gus Hall, alias lor Arva P* Halberg, Arvo Gust Halberg, Arvo Kustaa Halberg, Gus Hall Heft), Chairman of the Communist Party in Ohio, and Henry Winston, national organizing secretary, who were among Ihe eleven Communist Party officials sentenced in 1949 by Judge Harold Medina. Hall and Winston were imprisoned bclween court sessions after being found in contempt of court by Judge Medina. Ulin WORLD I'lKirei Gasper Hall, John Hollberg, and John Howell, fie has been convicted under the Smith Act. According to sworn testimony before the city solicitor of Warren. Ohio, in 1937, he was the leader of a bombing squad which obtained dynamite and nitroglycerin and which was assigned by Hall to blow up and destroy property of the Republic Steel Corporation, the homes of nonstriking workers, railroad property including tracks and bridges, huge tanks of highly volatile benzol, a municipal dam controlling water supply and the municipal electric light plant (hearings before the Special Committee on Un-American Activities, November 4, 1938). The selection of Gus Hall as one of the top leaders of the Party is extremely significant. Meetings of the shop club are called secretly — never by written communication and usually by word of mouth. Even phone calls are avoided. Meetings may be held in honies or in the local office of a Communist-controlled union or sympathetic organization. If a meeting room is rented, it is not hire-el in the name of the Party. Tlie work is divided up among the chairman, the financial secretary in charge of dues, the- organizational director in charge of recruiting and meeting arrangements, the press director in charge of Daily Worker sales anil distribution as well as other Communist literature, educational director in charge of study classes and propaganda meetings. As a rule, these meetings are held in the evening, once every week or two. No minutes are kept, and financial records are kept in code. Directives are presented orally from the nest higher body by a personal representative. For conspiratorial purposes, it may be necessary to divide up the members in a very large plant, into separate clubs by departments. For some time, the CPUSA published a confidential organ called the Party Organizer, later known as Contact. which was devoted to giving guidance to Party members on matters of organization. Although this magazine is no longer published, its advice is currently relevant with the exception that it is now issued orally instead of in writing. The March-April, 1932. issue of the Party Organizer, in describing correspondent C. B.S experiences in the Bethlehem Steel mill at Sparrows Point. Md.. declares: Grievances of the workers are sparks that can be developed into roaring flames of strike if they are carefully handled. The- question is what to do with this little spark. 000 Revolutionary workers have tlie- task of developing the grievance to ihe- highe-st level. A study is made of the nature of the alleged "grievance," the departments and workers affected. A leaflet is distributed dealing with the "grievance." The correspondent continues: The pay line on Monday will be- especially "hot," first, because ol the- grievance itself; second, lie-eause- of the- receipt eif the- leaflet; third, il our comrades participate in the conversation and raise- the- agitation to a liighe-r level, there are great possibilities for singling out good prospects tor a grievance group, wen to the extent of bringing workers right from the- pay line to their own home or bringing them to a ele-sig- nateel place- that was mentioned for this occasion where several capable comrades would he- em hand to speak to workers recruited in this manner, ° ° ° This account was followed by another signed by J. B. who described the Party's activity against a new boss in the Fisher Body plant: Immediately after this situation was reported, a very small leaflet em this matter was issued, This le-afle-t was distributed in this particular department in various places such as machines, lockers, and all other spots where tlie' worker could easily see them. At lunch time- one Party comrade Started to diSCUSS tlie- le-alle-l anel he- urge-el that a grie-N ani-e- committee should be organized. The committee went to the Page 41 V 1 fs ing
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