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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 048. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1307.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 048. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1307

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 048, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1307.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 048
Transcript 1 ' ■" ■■■■■■■■■■M machine with its wide ramifications is extremely solicitous of its faithful followers. Communist-front organizations and unions offer a source of jobs which are restricted to those who pay unquestioning homage to the Party line. There are members of the Communist Party who suffer from intense inner qualms about the correctness of the Party line and about its practices behind the Iron Curtain such as the maintenance of slave labor camps, Soviet imperialism, anti-Semitism, the regimentation of intellectuals and the suppression of civil rights. But in many cases they do not have the spiritual and moral courage required to make a break, which may sound fantastic to those who have no realization of the pressures to which a member is subject. Having become completely dependent upon his Communist surroundings and associates for his mental, spiritual and social sustenance, having isolated himself from non-Communist influences, friends and reading, he looks upon the very thought of a break as a personal tragedy. He dreads being cast out of the holy of holies. the temple of Soviet worship. He fears the vilification and slander which will be directed against him as a "renegade" by the Communist smear apparatus. Bemembering the mysterious case of Gen. Walter Krivitsky, former Soviet intelligence officer found dead in a Washington hotel, and Juliet Stuart Poyntz, who disappeared from the streets of New York City without a trace, he stands in mortal terror of physical assault or possible liquidation. If he is employed through a Communist union or front organization, it may mean the loss of his job. Cases have been known where the Party has threatened with exposure those who had become disaffected. It is much easier for the weak character to swallow his pride and his principles and just go along. Communist Clubs The nature of Communist organization fluctuates in strict accordance with the current political climate in which the party finds itself. During the period when Russia was our ally, when the Red Army was being glorified and the Communist Party was frantically supporting our war effort in order to save the "Soviet Fatherland" from Hitler's legions, Communist clubs met openly, sometimes numbering hundreds of participants in cities like New York. Today when Bussia has made the United States the chief target of its "cold war" and subversive activities, when the Communist Party is under fire and its leaders subjected to jail sentences, these clubs have been subdivided into groups of from three to five, meeting secretly, usually in homes. They are of two types, the shop club and the community club. The Shop Club, Red Spearhead The shop club is peculiar to the Communist Party and specially suited to its subversive and conspiratorial purposes. No other political party in this country has adopted this form of organization. It is a direct importation from the experience of the Russian Communist Party. Lenin, the Party's chief authority on matters of organization, long ago pointed out for Communists throughout the world that "Every factory is our stronghold." Prior to 1926, the American party was built on the basis of national language federations. Speaking before the sessions of the Enlarged Executive Committee of the Communist International held in Moscow in April, 1925, Gregory Zinoviev, chairman of that body, specifically Page 46 instructed the Workers (Communist) Party, as it was then called, "to fuse the national sections into a real united party." A directive letter was sent to the American party by the Communist International in which the Party was given until December 1, 1925, to reorganize its two most important districts, New York and Chicago. It was pointed out that "The factory nucleus is the best organizational method of uniting comrades belonging to different nationalities" and that "the work of properly organizing the party will be best accomplished by the organization of factory nuclei." For the guidance of American Communists, Moscow dispatched a special instructor named Marcus, who wrote a pamphlet, The Communist Nucleus, What It Is — How It Works, under the pseudonym of M. Jenks. From time to time, the party's internal and confidential organ carried additional detailed instruction from specialists of the Russian Communist Parry. To supplement this, J. Peters (deported to Communist Hungary in 1949) was sent to Moscow in the early thirties where he received extensive training as a result of whicJi he wrote the authoritative The Communist Party—' Manual on Organization. Today the shop nucleus is mors euphoniously called the shop club. The Communist International has given clear directives to the American Communist Party to concentrate upo" large industrial plants, It has even indicated what specific industries should be made the target. For example, tltf Party Organizer of February, 19.33, declared: The Communist International in January, 1931, raised feir our Party the need of concentrating on the most decisive industries (mine, steel, textile, auto, marine) in the five largest districts * * * (p. 5). The same issue of the Party Organizer even pinpoint, the cities selected, including Pittsburgh, Cleveland, V? troit, and Chicago, so that the party might "firmly ro<' itself in the decisive industries." Since that time, thflfl objectives have been broadened considerably to inelii''1 more key industrial cities. In Political Affairs for May, 1950, Henry Winston pr^ sents his report to the plenary meeting of the nation'" committee of the Communist Party, USA, in which '' points up the necessity for a maximum registration " Party members in the following basic- industries: an'- electrical, steel, coal, rubber, and railroad. What is the purpose of this concentration upon k«! industries? Again we must turn to the Communist I"'' national for a clear and forthright reply. Its rosnlu"'1, on imperialist war adopted at its sixth congress in *"* summer of 1928 i.s still the basic- line today. Presented the "main task in the struggle against imperialist *1 before it breaks out" is the following: factory anel trade- union activity must be concentrated VTK in.irily in the industries which serve the mobilization for an" conduct of war, like the metal industry, the chemical induS" try, anel transport • ° °. Side by side- with other revolutions mass actions (demonstrations, strikes in munitions wodj transport strikes, etc.) the general strike- * * * is an cxli-e-nico' important weapon ° ° °. The thirteenth plenum of the executive committee of' ■> Communist International in December, 1933. sunm"'1 I up most succinctly when it called upon affiliated Coin1"- nist parties to "concentrate their forces in each counts the vital parts of the war machine of imperialism. Communist jargon, all countries which are anti-ComlW! nist are labeled as "imperialist." Despite the fact that workers as a group find com'j nism repulsive, it must be remembered that the (< Facts Foiium News, May,J
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