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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
File 047
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 047. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1306.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 047. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1306

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 047, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1306.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 047
Transcript of former General Secretary Earl Browder is referred to, there is no reason to believe that the atmosphere has been Slanged under his successors: He [Browder] had grown almost into a dictator. His authority reached such a point that his word had become virtually unchallengeable in our Party. His policies and writings finally were' accepted al st uncritically by the- leaders and the general membership. Browder created around himself an atmosphere of infallibility and unchallengeable authority. All this was accentuated by the de-luge- eif petty-bourgeois adulation, praise-mongering anel hero-worship that was constantly poured upon him by our leadership anil our members ° Comrade- Browder had largely liquidated the- political functions e>f the- Party's leading hiulie-s. He- habitually by- passed die- National Board in policy-making ° ° ° The National Committee, also, had gradually lost all real political power. It assembled; it listened to Browder's proposals: il affirmed them; it dispersed tei the- districts to impress the- Policy on tlie- membership. Of genuine political discussion there' was none- in the National Committee. Similarly, our recent National Conventions were hardly better than the National Committee meetings — with the-ir formal endorsement ol Browder's reports — no political discussions. ° ° ° Why does a freeborn American accept such humiliating '""I despotic authority? In the first place, the- Communist fjas bevn taught that the end justifies any means, that the Werests of the so-called First Socialist Bepiiblic, to which ."' has voluntarily dedicated himself, are- paramount and ''Ktily any and every sacrifice. He willingly submits to a Fjscipline of his own choice regardless <>l where it may "■"1. surrendering all right to independent judgment. "hy does a man like Frederick Vanderbilt Field, scion a millionaire family, join the Communist Party? His ,lse is not an isolated one. It not infrequently happens ,.'''' such an individual, who is tin- heir of unearned mil- ""K- suffers from a severe guilt complex. He- feels his life 1 idleness is unproductive. Keenly sensitive tei the plight p the underdog, In- throws in his lot with the Communist ./"'ty to sake- his conscience, believing that the Party is , "' '-liampion of the underprivileged. He- takes the Party's 0|(1 lor it. making no attempt to investigate lor liimse-ll ,('' Communist institutions as slave labor camps, the I ""'t police- anel the- real plight of the common people p '""I the Iron Curtain. In fact, he is so grateful to the r'"''>' lor Ihe- spiritual relief it oilers that he will furiously vS|,"t tin- clients of anyone who tries to sot him straight ,, '' Hie- truth about tlie Soviet Union and communism tet>erally. , ' K not essentially correct to look upon Communists as (I ">ary criminals. Strangely enough, they may commit ,|"""ist heinous crimes, all the way from treason to niur- j,'1 "i tin- firm belief that the) are- thereby furthering the ''"'s,s nl humanity. They may he pursuing the highest (v, lv<s based upon the warped and erroneous conscience i.,1"'1 Communist doctrine has inculcated. Tims they will !IS,i'v the i tne- utmost ruthlessness, the Communist purge vi.' s; the use- of forced confessions anil the forced collecti- '""'ii ol millions of peasants, resulting in widespread . „!'ne and starvation. The favorite cold-blooded apology ' ) 'ett, '"i must break tin- eggs if you would have an omc- • the omelette in this ease being socialism. The Com- ,,,, "lst- iii other words, considers himself a solclie-r in the in, "National Communist army defending tin- interests ol I,, national communism and the- Soviet Union which, in t|(( "M-s. morally jusiilie-s the- taking of life, spying, and all iiH activities of war. Hence all anti-Communist programs i,| ■ nave in mind a twofold objective: ( 1 ) The first ii((,,.c''v<- must he the re-education of Communists through ""'s ol persuasion ami experience in order to rc-incor- ™ Pom m News, May, 1956 porate them into the ranks of sane and constructive citizens. It must be recognized that this is difficult since we are confronted in many cases with hard-bitten bigots. Nevertheless, it should be attempted since it is far more desirable to have a sophisticated, well-informed, and loyal citizen who can contribute his knowledge and experience to the fight against communism than one who is dedicated to defiance of the American government; (2) The second objective must be to invoke the full penalty of the law against recalcitrants both as a deterrent and as a means of the re-education of those not responsive to objective number one. Communist faith often invokes the fervor of a new religion. The Party member feels he is a member of an elite group who are privileged to live in a circle which is the germ of the new world of tomorrow. The non-party infidels, he thinks, are living in outer darkness in a world which is decadent and doomed. For the apostles and prophets of religion he substitutes Marx. Lenin, and Stalin. However, the Communist places himself on a higher Frederick Vanderbilt Field, financial angel of left wing causes who has been pictured as "sugar daddy" of the Institute of Pacific Relations, was questioned about IPR operations and his connection with it by the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee in 1952. Field, in an earlier appearance, would not say whether he had ever been a Communist. pedestal than would a mere religous convert. Communist theory has a certain superficial logic which makes an appeal to the intellectual. Thus in many cases individuals are recruited for the Party through Communist Party schools and theoretical works. Frequently emotional and idealistic factors tend to blur the mental processes and to obliterate sound standards of judgment which the same individual will unhesitatingly apply in some other intellectual field in which he may be an expert. The Communist zealot is never as critical toward Communist theory or practice as he would normally be in his studies or in industry. Lest it be assumed that individuals join the Communist Party solely because of certain psychological aberrations, lor idealistic reasons or because of the party's intellectual appeal, it should be realized that the organization is in a position to oiler attractive material benefits. There are businessmen who are completely dependent for contracts upon the good graces of the Soviet government. Communist lawyers, accountants, and insurance men draw generous incomes from their services tei Communist unions, front organizations, or individual Communists or sympathizers. Certain columnists, writers, musicians, actors, and artists find it extremely profitable to cater to left wing intellectual and artistic- circles. The Communist patronage V 1 is insr i- Page 45
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