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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
File 046
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 046. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1305.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 046. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1305

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 046, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1305.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 046
Transcript •msmsmssstm sense of assurance. One young Communist even went so far as to write an article entitled "My Father Is a Liar" in the New Masses some years ago. In 1940 a group^if young Communists booed President Roosevelt on the White House lawn, the first time in our history that such a disrespectful act was committed against an American President. Unfortunately our school system has not fully equipped our young men and women to see through Communist sophistry and trickery. The Communist movement offers attractive bait to those who crave companionship and excitement. It offers relief from boredom. One issue of the Daily Worker, for example, in its "What's On?" column invited its readers to — Films, discussion, dance Folk dancing Welcome home party for Mike Gold Vote Your Own Film Club Saturday Night Film Club Negro-White Unity Cultural Festival Artists ball People's drama theater Spring frolic- Maritime shindig Jefferson theater workshop May Day workshop dance Soviet film Pre-May Day social Balalaika Symphonic Orchestra concert One hour of social theater Chinese cultural cabaret Once an individual enters the Communist Party, he separates himself psychologically from life outside the Party, from his former social contacts, his family, and his business associates. He lives in a world which is hermetically sealed off from the outside by a more and more impenetrable iron curtain of continuous indoctrination to which he has become addicted to the exclusion of all other outside sources of information and thought. He relies upon Party literature, schools, and spokesmen for his views and information. He attends pro-Communist plays. If he attends a concert or a social function, it is one given as a benefit for the Daily Worker or some other Communist cause. It is a satisfying experience for certain types of people. In this closed circle the Communist hears the same Communist cliches reiterated over and over again with never a doubting word. It is like listening to familiar music. He meets the same or similar people wherever he goes, all moving in the same Communist rut. Here he can be sure of approbation and sympathy, since he is always among his ideological kinfolk. He is never isolated. Added to all this is the excitement of picket lines, strikes, mass meetings, parades, demonstrations, tiffs with the police, and arrests. An active Communist will sometimes attend several meetings a day. In other words, there is not a dull moment. There is no doubt that the Communist network holds an attraction for adventurous spirits who thrive on the conspiratorial atmosphere within the Party, the secret meetings, the resort to aliases, the paraphernalia of illegality and opposition to constituted authority. Those who have a tendency to rebel against tradition and convention — the Bohemians and the nonconformists of all stripes —are naturally attracted to the Communist movement. By its repudiation of so-called capitalist ethics and moral standards, the Party provides a welcome philosophical sanction for the lunatic fringe. According to Communist theory the family, as we know it, is an institution designed to protect and extend property rights, which are anathema to the Beds. By branding our government as capitalistic, Communist philosophy justifies any breach or defiance of governmental authority. There are timid souls, persons with a distinct inferiority complex, who are inspired to boldness when they become part of an aggressive group. The wolf who is a coward Page 44 Earl Browder (right!. Communist presidential candidate, 1936, crosses hammer and sickle held by Charles Krumbein, stole secretary of the poni' as they stood before a crowd that jammed Madison Square Garden for "* final rally of the campaign. singly becomes a scourge as part of a pack. Psychologic refer to these people aptly as ambitious cowards. A Com munist writer, who is himself a temperamental cowart will find considerable delight and satisfaction in writi* in the columns of the (Communist) Daily Worker $ sounding and defiant tirades against the monopolists ■ those in high places in the government. The Party is, in a sense, a vehicle for anyone with " ax to grind, for anyone who has become embittered eitBl by some unfortunate personal or emotional experience, victim of some serious physical ailment or handicap. ; second-rate artist, a lawyer without clients, a doctor wit* out patients, a writer without an outlet, or a pread1' without a parish, whose personal ego is soothed by *B thought that it is all the fault of the capitalist system. _•* finds in the Party an instrument to vent his spleen ag»| the imagined source of injury, as well as a recept' audience. It is often asked why a Communist who is most vi'"' ment before an agency of the American government defense of civil rights, will meekly submit without del'1!, or protest to the slightest whim of a Soviet dictator or Communist Party, USA, even though it may mean a C plete repudiation of his most sacred principles. Thus | Communist who had for years denounced Nazism an1' its works, reconciled himself overnight to the Stalin-H1 | Pact, and for him Nazism became merely a "matte1 taste." Similarly those who fumed against capitalism ""J Wall Street became willing to shake the hand of J- J Morgan as soon as Earl Browder, then general secrwB of the Communist Party, gave such Party heresy his WJ ing during the period when Russia was desperately se^ ing a united front against Nazi Germany. In certain liberal circles there i.s an illusion that Communist movement is the very epitome of demod It is therefore worthwhile to present at this p<>>'.. description ol inner Party democracy in the highest e' I Ions of the Party by William Z. Foster, its chairina"; 1 Political Affairs for September, 1945. Although the i1'-"1 Facts Fohum News, May, J funeti passce N'atioi power affirme policv there reccnl N'atioi iiie-ht Whv ;"id des '"is bee "'leivst, '"' has llstifv a *scipli, '""•I. su Whv , "f a „„• ''-it s,l(. V su " Ml.-,,, gfteu. tl v to *<>rd |,„ *** Co I'V'"''" "'"'Kl . ""> l.„ (>"t th > the """ei-ullv lf is lie ;;"i,,„„ >'SN ■M C, Nify „ H the £>« ::;:::•" i„"'"''" ;;>:;'■'«■• "'St I '"'""His,
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