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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 045. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1304.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 045. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1304

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 045, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1304.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 045
Transcript 'n the February, 1940, issue of the American Mercury. These cases are by no means typical of the industry at the Present time. I saw Social Consciousness quicken and come to a beiil in ue tors, writers, and directors whose names rival Rinso and C.'.eiiiels as household words. I followed the insurrection, mass meeting by mass meeting, cocktail party by cocktail party, nniil many a Big tVame was more or less secretly enrolled in the- Communist Party or tagging along solemnly in one of the "front" leagues and committees ° ° °. But on the whole- f [ollywood is a city of unhappy successful people. And that, it seemed to me-, was the- basis for corrununism with two butlers and a swimming pool ° " °. Actors, writers, 'directors anel Efollywoodians on the fringes of the- movie business joined Party "fractions" which met in Beverly Hills. Bel Air anel Brentwood underground <|-1K tn he-ar the Party line • * •. One famous comedian wrote an article for the Screen "Uild Magazine entitled "Are We Laborers?" in which he attempted to prove that the- actor or writer, like the tnick- ,|v<t. is a proletarian slave writhing in the chains of capi- t,l,ism. Another famous script writer propounded the 'I'Kstiem "Is the Middle Class in the Middle?" to which "' answered, "If the middle class wants to get rid of its "hite collar of servitude, it had better get its picket lines "i order." Screenwriter Mary C. McCall in the Screen Guild Mag- ";''ie lor February, 1937, said that for those enlisted in the "'""1 cause, "life- begins" at 5:30. She declared: then we can listen to speeches and sign pledges, and feel "iat wanning glow which comes from being packed in close u'itli a lot of people whe> agree- with you — a milel hypnotism, ii'iel exhilirating pleasurable hysteria. Living as they do in an unreal world of images, some of eni envy the farmer and the laborer for his contact with i auty. The Communist myth offers a dream world which !.'s all the earmarks of reality. For them the Soviet "para- 'v' is that reality, in which at last they have a personal '"1(1 contributory stake. , «e special May Day issue of the Daily Worker for Pi il 30, 1950, demonstrated the type of middle class pro- ( Ss">nals attracted by the Communist Party. This issue 'r,|ed paid greetings from: A group of Queens' dentists A group of Manhattan physicians A group of Bronx dentists A group of college teachers Manhattan dentists A progressive- Doctor of Chiropractic White Collar Section, CPUSA Cultural Division, N. Y. Stale- Communist Party Progressive Playwrights A group of librarians According to John Williamson, then organizational sec- A '"'V nl the Communist Party of the United States of ^?er>ca, writing in Political Affairs for February, 1946, M. Per cent of the Party in New York City consists of . e collar workers, professionals and housewives." ,, '' " number of cases it will be found that the Party is I,., "Re for certain psychologically maladjusted individ- ' ft nurse at a neurological clinic in New York affirmed years ago that she recommended joining the Com- *«.„. "'st Party for some of her maladjusted patients who i„|,'(,(' some- outlet for their nervous energy and she \C) ''"' that the prescription had brought good results in ,'"' instances. eiy Masses and Mainstream, a Communist monthly mag- tris't'' f'" Xoveiiil>er. 1949, Francis II. Bartlett, a psychia- vjS( ' fplains "how capitalism causes neuroses" and ad- '"Volving "the neurotic individual in a cooperative >F, oiu-m News, May, 1956 effort with us to understand and root out the individualistic goals to which he clings." In the» same issue of Masses and Mainstream, Joseph Wortis, another psychiatrist who has since invoked the Fifth Amendment in refusing to answer inquiry regarding his Communist Party membership, describes how "progressive" psychoanalysts deliver public lectures "on the psychological consequences of capitalism" which "leaves many in the audience frightened and palpitating, with no alternative but to place themselves and their families at the disposal of the already overtaxed facilities of the lecturer." A recent example is the ease of Mrs. Jean Murray, a former Communist, charged with trying to blackmail prosecution witnesses in the trial of Harry Bridges. She was sent for psychiatric examination by Federal Judge Louis B. Goodman in San Francisco after she attacked the court attendants screaming, "Workers, arise. Prepare yourself for the revolution." Maladjusted individuals feel themselves isolated. Communist theory places the blame for such maladjustments upon society rather than the individual, which is a comforting thought for the individual concerned. Mr. Bartlett holds out the following promise to those who would join in the "struggle against capitalism": In this process, the barriers between individuals are broken down; people develop closer bonds with each other; they iele-nttiy themselves with broader and broader segments of humanity; they lose the sense of isolation anel develop feelings of solidarity. ° ° ° In short, their lives, in spite of capitalism and against it, begin to acquire significance and direction. Joseph North, a feature writer for the Daily Worker of May 3, 1950, describes another case of a "gifted writer '"a Communist," who told North "she was being psychoanalyzed." "I have been having trouble in a group where I belong," she said. She brought her troubles to her psychoanalyst and his advice was to leave the group, she said, because it "deflates my ego." She reported no such negative reaction from her membership in the Communist Party. The neurotic person is baffled by the complexities of modern society. The Marxist-Leninist formula offers a ready-made answer to all questions. The Communist is firmly convinced that in place of the "old bourgeois society, with its classes and class antagonisms," he possesses the key to Utopia "in which the free development ol each is the condition for the free development of all" (Marx). Psychiatrists admit that the problems of the adolescent border closely upon those of the neurotic. They are similar in many respects. The adolescent tends to rebel against tin- domination of his parents and adults generally. He is seeking a medium through which to declare his personal independence. In a sense he is maladjusted. The Communist movement, for its own insidious purpose, offers him a circle in which he believes he will be taken seriously. It will publish his articles in a youth magazine. It will offer him an audience for his artistic talents. It will make him an executive secretary of some front organization and give him authority he has never had before. He, therefore, accepts its discipline voluntarily, even enthusiastically. More- than that. By dint of his acceptance of the Marxist-Leninist dogma, lie suddenly feels himself superior to his parents and the adult world around him. He now has all the- answers. It gives him a certain confidence and Page 43 V in<r v
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