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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 044. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1303.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 044. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1303

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 044, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1303.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 044
Transcript —— and sincerely repudiated his Communist moral code the individual could and would simultaneously repudiate the type of behavior which it justified. Failure to understand how to handle the ex-Communist and how to make full use of his inside knowledge of the Communist conspiracy may result in costly errors for the United States. Recruiting No political party in the country is as aggressive in recruiting new members as is the Communist Party, nor as systematic. J. Peters in his Manual on Organization lays down the principle that "Continuous daily recruiting is the basic task of every Unit and each individual member of the Party." Recruiting is compulsory with each Party member, who is expected to fulfill his share of the quota assigned to his club or section in regular Party recruiting campaigns. These campaigns are usually concentrated upon workers in the basic industries, upon Negroes, whom the party considers as useful, explosive tinder in promoting social friction, and upon influential people in various walks of life. Each Party member is expected to keep a list of prospects whom he is expected to cultivate systematically, under specific Party direction. In her pamphlet, The Communist Party and You, Betty Gannett, Assistant Organization Secretary of the CPUSA, makes the following suggestions: a Communist must constantly help to educate his fellow workers, through the sale and distrihution of Communist literature, securing subscriptions for the Communist press, individual discussions, and through influencing the most militant workers to join the Communist Party • • • 000 make new friends, especially in your shop, your union, your organization, or the neighborhood in which you live. You will find that our Communist press, our hundreds of popular pamphlets, will help you bring them nearer to our Party. Use this material constantly — it is your best aid. It is also true that the Party has a tremendous turnover as converts become disillusioned and drop out. Hence the importance of attracting new gullibles. The following account of the recruiting of an American Communist is to be found in Life for January 5, 1948: He joined the Party in 1935, when he was 20 years old. It wasn't simple, like joining the Democratic party or the Elks. It was the reward for three years of work, study and obeelicnce to discipline * • • It began when he was still a high-school student in Chicago as social pleasure and what he thought then to be intellectual adventure ° • *. There were- parties, picnics, beach suppers, all with songs and laughter, discussions and admiring girls. • • • Of course there was another side to all this. There were tasks, little ones at first, more important ones later. He distributed literature at mass meetings, walked in a hunger march, and it was rather fun, even a little exciting. He did not notice that he was being watched by the older men, watched for ability and obedience • • • Soon he was attending the Workers' School three evenings a week. One or two evenings he worked on Party activities — wrapping newspapers at the print shop, attending mass meetings, picketing the mass meetings of other organizations, • • • After three months of the Workers' School he could spot a "supporter," a "diversion- ist" or a "dissenter" in a conversation on the weather. • • • He had his membership in the Party. • • • What Makes a Communist Tick? The question is often asked, "What makes an individual join the Communist Party in the first place?" No single answer will suffice. In each case there may be a different motive or a mixture of motives. In some cases they are the result of normal psychological factors. Sometimes Page 42 there are distinctly abnormal features involved. It is nee essary to understand these motives and factors if we an successfully to deal with the problem. A trite explanation offered by the ill-informed is tbi communism is a product of inequalities under our social system. Hence, these people argue, if we will allevial these conditions, we will never have to worry about corn- munism. Since it is manifestly impossible to devise ■ social system in which everybody will be satisfied, thi would mean that we should meekly fold our arms an' accept communism in our midst as a necessary evil f" which we ourselves are chiefly to blame. In the secofl place, this approach overlooks the fact that millions 0 dollars spent on cleverly devised Communist propagand' is bound to have some effect in any society, no matte how relatively contented, especially when supplemented by the activities of thousands of ardent zealots. The misery theory of communism runs contrary to to actual facts in our country. New York State, for example has approximately 50 per cent of the total Communis Party membership and leads the country. Yet it is secoi* in terms of per capita income as well as per capita scho*1 expenditures. California is second with approximate! 16 per cent of the total Party membership and yet it * fourth in terms of per capita income and seventh in ten" of per capita school expenditures. Similarly, Illinois is thif in membership standing with approximately 5 per eel and yet it is sixth in per capita income and third in teir* of money spent for schools. Conversely, Mississippi is lowest in the scale of CojJ munist Party membership but is also lowest in per cap1 income. The misery theory of communism does not ji' with these figures, nor with the fact that such wealf persons as Frederick Vanderbilt Field, and promine' members of the Hollywood film colony have been foil* to be members of the Communist Party. Indeed the rW ery theory of communism is exactly what the Commun^ would have us believe, in order to mislead us. A corollary to this theory is that workers are attract' to the Communist Party in the hope of improving W lot economically. Despite Russia's claim to be a worW republic, the Communist movement, by its disruptive ta, tics and support of Soviet slave labor camps, has arODJ the deepest hostility of labor. Labor has, there-lore. ' pressed little desire to migrate to the so-called "work* paradise." Both the American Federation of Labor the Congress of Industrial Organizations arc today bitt^ fighting the Communists. In his report to the plenary H sion of the national committee of the CPUSA held March 23-25, 1950, Henry Winston, organizational S«| tary, deplored the Party's "central weakness in the W in the These e Present I ill ;ee Came meeti until ill the the - Bi ful p comn Ae (ring) met i cells 1 One- 1 G"e7</ \ ''"einpt driver, i Nism. <l"csti,„ l|(' ansu Hit,. „ 'n order Screei "-•lie f01 good ca Then that w *ith a and « Living ""'■n em Nitv. 'i Jsailtl 'lis,.- '"ill is t cunt T|H- s, >il 30 ^Med ,- to win the workers" and declared that in its effort to 1* support for Henry A. Wallace's Progressive Party union "rank-and-file generally" did not respond, lie f phasized the fact that "the coalition tactic our P^ worked out beginning with the 1948 convention W8J ' fully unfolded in the shops." Thus the Communist P has little ground for the label of "proletarian." It would seem, on the contrary, that a large peree" L of the Party consists of mission-minded Intellectuals ] have constituted themselves the exponents of the intC1 of labor, which wants no part of them. William Bledsoe, former editor of the Screen ** I Magazine in Hollywood, has brilliantly described tlie,« actions of wealthy movie stars and writers in his •" I entitled "Revolution Came to Hollywood," which apl"''1 Facts Forum News, May, f if< In col ft m •01 nu. yea Kit 1, "H f. ." mst N, 'live >Foi
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