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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
File 042
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 042. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1301.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 042. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1301

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 042, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1301.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 042
Transcript 1,1 ■i-i^™"™ union officials to formally resign while remaining under Party discipline. It should be remembered that Party membership is not looked upon as a possession of the individual, but strictly a possession of the Party, to give, withhold, or retract. The Party does not recognize any voluntary resignation. Those who fall from the good graces of the organization are expelled. The attitude of the world Communist organization toward resignations i.s reflected in Section 30 of the Statutes of the Communist International from which we quote in part: Resignation from office by individual members or groups of members of Central Committees of the various Sections is regarded as disruptive of the Communist movement. Leading posts in the Party do not belong to the occupant of that post, hut to the Communist International as a whole. ° ° 8 Certain tests may be made to determine the legitimacy and sincerity of a resignation. No one of them should be considered as complete and decisive. They should be judged in terms of the pattern of the individual's pro- Communist or anti-Communist behavior since the resignation. The following questions may properly be asked in connection with each resignation: Does the individual have a carbon copy of his resignation? What was the real motive of the resignation? Was he, or the Communist Party, or one or more of its controlled organizations in a position to benefit thereby? What was the attitude of the Communist press toward the action? Do his views, writings, readings, associations, and general attitude indicate that he is still loyal to the Party line or that he has, in fact, repudiated it? Can he corroborate this claimed repudiation of the Party with written evidence or the statements of known anti-Communists? The individual's record with the FBI since his resignation is, of course, important. A test of the individual's sincerity is his willingness to expose his associates in the ranks of the Communist conspiracy and its methods of operations. Unwillingness to do this may indicate some remnants of loyalty to the Party. At the same time, it should be made clear by government agencies that such information is looked upon as a valuable contribution to the security of the country and not, as the Communists would have it regarded, as an act of petty talebearing. There are definite cases on record where withdrawals from the Party are apparently under Party instructions. A number of known Communist union leaders have signed non-Communist affidavits in order to be in a position to avail themselves of the machinery of the National Labor Relations Board. During World War II, known Communists, who were members of the Armed Forces, were allegedly given a leave of absence in order to make them eligible for commissions. This did not prevent them from faithfully following the Communist Party line and from holding official positions in the Communist Party after the close of the war. Such instructed withdrawals are clearly suspect. Effective countermeasures against the world-wide Communist conspiracy require an intelligent attitude toward the ex-Communists both here and abroad. In the event of actual armed conflict with the Soviet Union, psychological warfare will play an important part in determining victory. We must know how to win over the forces of a possible enemy. We must develop skill in handling those we have succeeded in disaffecting. In a sense, our handling of the ex-Communists in this country gives us valuable preliminary training which should be highly useful in the event of an actual conflict. A policy of "once a Communist Page 40 m Commi been c Com mi The btellig, Wth l„ •tibstitu indicia I I* Algei |*s, 11.., "N-f"'l!l! *y nude Those w'r>rld a Pining simple ; evini: world eM As ine Gen. Wolter G. Krivitsky, Soviet Intelligence Chief for seventeen yeors ** Hn elabl was found shot in a Washington hotel in the early forties, tells the 0* he |ls..,| Committee (1939) of the 1936-37 Soviet purge which he said took live' (.j . 35,000 members of the Red Army officers' corps. Committeemen, I. to a" are: Rep. Jerry Voorhis (D-Calif.l; Rep. Martin Dies, Chairman (D-To*1* . <lt ks and Rep. Thomas J. Parnell (R-N.J.). , '"'terreii the C always a Communist" would be disastrous. Given a * r*tfon () tatorship guarded by its ruthless secret police, with ' ""media 15 million slave laborers, with its 100 million peasafl . The h groaning under the yoke of collectivization, with 1° * r<-pled living standards and general dissatisfaction, there is ev'1' "Kited e reason to believe that the proper type of psycholoU"- "h-lljer,. warfare could do much to disaffect Communist forces, "rashii shorten a war, and save many lives. A wrong appro"' " 0ppo would retard the process of disaffection and strengW i ""d dc the hand of the Communists. It must be remembered ('jit<•], v this connection, that by using unsound methods the: N* , "et Sti repelled millions of Russians who deserted in the last ^ > "'>' va and thus solidified the forces of the Red army. «. *i wh Within our own borders it is estimated that it tn* . '"e of 1 from ten to twenty investigators to keep one subject ill* 0^ '""I constant surveillance. With a party membership of 22™ ^ ^'"iciie and at least ten times that number of sympathizers. V|et Ui would take a secret police of close to a million to main" ""st t, a constant surveillance of this group. This is utterly '', s' 'K(,s. , trary to our democratic traditions and would mean ""v ai setting up of an enormous American Gestapo or M . j "at i Within the limits of its resources, the FBI is, of coi,f s . ">' in doing a magnificent job. Nevertheless, it must be t&\in e of t nized that in combating a conspiratorial organization eluding, directly or indirectly, at times, within its of' more than half a million individuals and at the same f exerting its efforts against crime of every conceivable tj the FBI is confronted with a stupendous task. Hence information ™ necessity of relying upon all availabl can be obtained from ex-Communists. It is sometimes asked, "How do we know the ri in -I*"- j its i Communists have actually reformed? How do we W, \\ '(' "nci efor*],^ K^ that they are not secret agents of Joseph Stalin?" ' f questions may be based upon shier ignorance of the V gj^' '" th lem coupled with a desire to disguise that ignoranC. ., " test if* J*>1 the assumption of an attitude of apparent supercs""] h.""(' v without any specific foundation. They may be based "' a stubborn unwillingness to face hard and unple*] i|(,, "'" facts. On the other hand, they may be the result "j of „,l"d.s i Communist plant intended to east doubt upon those v fj0 e can best expose them. From the Communist viewpoint j,, h ea excellent strategy to confuse opponents and discredit *\ $ta '''' th effective witnesses. This shallow skepticism town''' "ie Facts Forum News, May, H * por i^crilH "lil, tn ie i. "hi (' that „, «St el; l„. """Vd "ovv
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