Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
File 038
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 038. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1297.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 038. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1297

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 038, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1297.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 038
Transcript i^MH ■»■ ■" was a super or overriding task force. The Hoover Commission bodily adopted the recommendations of the Committee. The most obvious opportunity to make real savings in the cost of government is in the Department of Defense, because it has three-fourths of the government's payroll and more than 60 per cent of its total budget. Many weaknesses discovered in the Defense Department are due to the expansion of the military services in twenty years from a civilian personnel of 140,000 to 1,180,000 and a military personnel from 250,000 to nearly three million. Many of these systems, efficient in the smaller dimensions of the past, are inefficient today. When task forces, the Commission said, pointed out examples of the workings of these outmoded systems, it was for the purpose of illustration and not in criticism of officials or departments or agencies. Officials have struggled manfully with these tangles and have brought about many improvements. Considering the difficulties under which they labor, the Defense Department is better administered than might have been expected, it was observed. The Department of Defense, which is the largest organization of government, consumes one-seventh of the national income. It employes 4,300,000 people, or more than twice the manpower of the country's ten largest corporations combined. Its assets, real and personal, approximate $140 billion, which is equal to the value of all priVately- owned land in the United States. Its activities extend throughout the forty-eight states, to 16,000 cities and abroad to fifty-two other countries. The Hoover Commission underscored need for continuing improvements in the organization of the Department of Defense to accomplish three objectives: 1. Clear and unchallenged direction of the entire defense establishment by the Secretary of Defense, the Secretaries of the three military departments, and their secretariats. 2. Logical delegation of responsibilities to the members of the secretariats, so that each has a manageable set of duties and adequate authority to carry them out. 3. Close teamwork among all members of the top executive organization, including the members of the secretariats and those responsible for the military command of the operating forces. In addition, the Committee urged recognition of the importance of providing capable career assistants to each member of each secretariat, and that continuity be improved by having staff positions in the Office of the Secretary of Defense increasingly filled by trained career specialists. BUDGET AND ACCOUNTING A revitalized Bureau of the Budget that would apply methods which private business has found essential to successful and economical operation can bring improved financial management to government agencies, with savings estimated by a task force at $4 billion a year. A report with twenty-five recommendations to accomplish these objectives constituted one main part of the Hoover Commission's work. The Bureau of the Budget has long had responsibility for furthering adequate accounting and financial methods on the executive agencies. Yet, in the Commission's opinion, it is evident that sufficient recognition has not been given to this responsibility. The Commission recommended that the Bureau's name Page 36 be changed to "The Office of Budget and Executive Man agement," and said: "Budgeting is far more importan than preparing figures and estimates of proposed cxpendi Jn- an tures. The budgeting functions are vital to the whole con [' "'"' duct of government. In the preparation of the budget li< ked f< not only the control of departmental expenditures, bu P*a*er the power to insist on efficient methods in management o s^arch the spending agencies. Within an effective budgeting sys *ne ' tern lies the restoration of the full control of the nationa ent is purse to Congress." ,""'*'' ' The task force stated that under present procedure! °n red there is no effective control over expenditures either 1'!,,' ' ;l Congress or by the executive branch. ., the Among the major problems for which the Commissioi > fee recommended solutions is that of huge unexpended appro priations carried forward from year to year, running a high as $78,400,000,000 for fiscal year 1954, $68 billion fa The C 1955, and an estimated $53,900,000,000 for 1956. rate adm The Commission recommended that congressional appro ties, and priations as well as the executive budget be made in terri Wises o of estimated annual accrued expenditures, namely charge The (j for the costs of goods and services to be received. °n the su Proper accounting methods are needed in governmef"0' legal as well as in industry, the Commission said, to provio B*reer si information which is basic to effective management. 1 Wy. has been estimated that 910,000 full-time employees an Chief tens of thousands of additional man-years in part-tin ('*v Veil efforts are needed to compile the financial facts whi< '°ulcl Ik government agencies need, and to assure the public: integrity in government spending. OVERSEAS ECONOMIC OPERATIONS Despite mistakes and waste, foreign aid, which has cl American taxpayers more than $50 billion since the el of World War II, should be continued, but not in countfi which no longer need economic assistance; and should . .Mi. reorganized and economically administered, with the p Woy(, mary purpose of strengthening the security of the Unit States. Such was the view of the Hoover Commissi11 which made eleven recommendations in this departmj The Commission cited President Eisenhower's statem* that, inasmuch as the European countries originally m0 bers of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization H reached the greatest industrial productivity of their l'1 tory, no further economic aid need be given them. TW will continue to benefit from our support of NATO *• our maintenance of troops in Europe. Some of the money spent on this program in the ■ has been spent unwisely and in some cases the taxpafj 'l'r cent, have not received full value for their money, the Comfl ^'u. sion said; and estimated that if its recommendations * „Mainr , f*ases oi .Tlie Ci NieD, Wive d, P depu ijor '-i-s i, s and a >..io * real, N't in top >'1"H-1 r,""<-l,l sion said; and estimated that if its recommendations Jlri.",a]or i adopted at least $360 million can be saved annually vffl lvil Sen out prejudice to the objectives. Among other things, \ ['"''i-i ,l(| Commission advised a strong, unified control from l J; ennt]]] United States (which frequently speaks with numeral l ° Won] conflicting voices, open to misconstruction); recommend (), Politics that special emphasis be placed on agricultural and irfl (, '""iv , tion projects; that technical assistance programs be b11? r. ° 0ver upon organization of joint local and American units; " t'' ii;itllr economic aid of all kinds be limited to such undertake », /"nl], i Siho,d; nomic aid be granted for projects where private invti tt, , Sen as can be staffed with qualified personnel; that no * nomic aid be granted for projects where private inV| ment capital is available; and that all economic aid, ^''litioi contingent upon good-faith efforts of the recipient cou" to improve- the investment climate both for domestic * foreign capital of a private nature. ft** aced Coi LMi. Facts Forum News, May, ^\ s For
File Name uhlib_1352973_v005_n005_038.jpg