Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
File 036
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 036. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1295.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 036. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1295

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 036, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1295.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 036
Transcript ^mmmmm I " ™ ■■bmumi^^H must be to provide for the development of our water resources, maintenance of waterways, and so on. "The questions before this Commission are how these problems can be solved constructively for the benefit of the people as a whole, and maintain our basic social and economic- system." PAPERWORK MANAGEMENT Three recommendations in two reports on this subject urged general federal supervision over all phases of paperwork management throughout the executive branch of the government, to simplify, reduce, standardize, and otherwise improve the requirements. Immediate savings could be made if legislation were enacted authorizing changes in Employers Quarterly Federal Tax Return, as recommended by the Internal Revenue Service and the Social Security Administration. TRANSPORTATION In its report on Transportation, the Hoover Commission made twenty-one recommendations, to accomplish a modem traffic management and to eliminate waste, duplication, and inefficiency in the federal government's peacetime expenditure of close to $3 billion a year to haul passengers and freight. The Commission urged that the government, as the largest shipper of persons and property and as the operator of vast transport facilities of its own, organize and manage its traffic so as to give full recognition to the importance of an adequate and prosperous transportation system, in accordance with the intent of Congress; and recommended that a Director of Transportation be established by the "Secretary of Defense, this official to have no responsibilities except those pertaining to traffic and transportation. REAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Operation and management of a vast realty empire listed at $40,800,000,000 (representing only the original acquisition and construction costs) were found to be handled under a decentralized and wasteful system requiring the full-time services of 370,000 federal employees. The Commission, in thirteen recommendations, emphasized: (1) the magnitude of this realty problem, involving 400,000 properties, buildings, and facilities, including 838,000,000 acres of land; all controlled by twenty-seven different agencies; and (2) the urgent need for modern business methods to achieve economies and efficiency. To meet present deficiencies and to effect substantial savings, the Commission recommended centralized management control, also supervision and prompt creation of a comprehensive and continuing inventory showing servicing costs, condition, type, and extent of occupancy in all buildings, et cetera. The task force estimated that if all its recommendations were adopted and fully carried out, aggregate annual savings might amount to as much as $185,000,000. It also said that $1,225,000,000 might be returned to the Treasury through disposal of plants and other properties which might be determined to he surplus if all occupied space were fully and efficiently utilized. There was said to be a lack of adequate and up-to-date records and of financial accounting for space entrusted to the various agencies. The task force found no central management and no agency of the government which maintained over-all ac- Page 34 ■=*. counting records or inspection of the process of real management. Moreover, great recoveries of invested ca ital could be made by disposition of surplus real esta & and by establishing adequate property management K the agencies. FOOD AND CLOTHING I I Taxpayers could save more than $340,000,000 of tl ■ government's annual bill for food and clothing throu| |f unified, efficient management and tighter inventory CO |j trols. The Hoover Commission estimated that its propos; for streamlining these operations could effect over-all satsifcs ings of at least 10 per cent annually in the governmen purchases, and 10 per cent more in storage and handlii of food and clothing. Substantial savings might also be achieved in foo Where the Commission expressed concern over the h>. that stocks of certain items sometimes are held in storal for years and virtually ignored, while fresh addition stocks are being purchased and used. The total inventor! of food for the three services were found to exceed S2 million. The task force cited great waste, duplication, overla ping, and an unnecessary number of agencies concern with food and clothing. It found the Navy holding t^ -xr?^ packs and supplies of food while other services neecljSS^ and were buying current packs. It reported complete of teamwork between purchasing and stock managome The Commission noted a shortage of high-caliber I broadly-trained personnel in the food and clothing fid in the armed services, and reported that constant rotatJ of military personnel, bringing in many persons not pr^ ously familiar with subsistence, results in costly andp? effect continuous on-the-job training programs. Under the Commission's plan the centralized subsisteBj units should make all food and clothing purchases for ' service on a ne-gotiated contract basis, after notice of in* to purchase, rather than by the slower, more costly, ni< cumbersome advertisement-and-bid method. The task force found too main- service depots in op6 Governi tion, and tremendous quantities of depot stocks .belie* RQcy in to be far in excess of what was needed for the operatl lavailab levels set by the armed services. The Marine Corps "lie ()| t^ current strength could be equipped with green coats' the fede 3.2 years from the stocks then on hand, and its stock V new green trousers was sufficient for 3.5 years. R, („ Mll The Commission explained that its report and I fej were studies of its task force were directed at improvement * 1(1 Sj3 io( modernization of the subsistence systems now in use ' sucn |n Kvss HANDLING SURPLUS FEDERAL PROPERTY "lie mil ui ""Ns ac There were- twenty-three recommendations in the 1','"n( it ver Commission report on surplus property — rec-iiiin1>.. l'd that dations which, if carried out, are expected to save taSI\''-' Stock ers billions of dollars and gei a long way toward ( ing the annual deficit in the national budget im" i "''.'. Jk',u,|y it'1 For the- next several years, huge- quantities of supP "'n vain approaching an annual rate of $2 billion, accpiisition ^ j""'d for will be purged from government warehouses. M|H "th the techniques of selling were urged. P* on thi The government has an enormous pool of assets am''1^''1'!- ther ing to some $155 billion scattered throughout the from which surpluses come, creating ■ . i g a disposal pro'] P can aire does not in*' ' gove both immense and complex. This figure ones not »'v;j|k,swem the value of land in the public domain, or surplus ", Pj« inspect commodities, or stockpiles of strategic- materials. ' chain Facts Forum News, May, \ ^s Fori I*. in goi ,>';",. ''Hals ti be
File Name uhlib_1352973_v005_n005_036.jpg