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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
File 035
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 035. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1294.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 035. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1294

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 035, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1294.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 035
Transcript rnd jewel liquidate fined stead mitting roduce icers. It ■search Tied to noted irld War tl. at ri-i an th th- ie Comnfl ■ permit ft tions whifl i/iewed atf )ly militaf. tnowledg* being prf own efiot e, with ft gories i*J nance, f* onstructf 100,000 pa* s, the to* irity of tl1 private a* izing ma"^ -t I ng man- . -lines, hV he MiBjl Tying i'1" is of cai han halt' irivate 4 , to pr< F the car ) could lomy to v reserve* , shipbuij ■nderedj eakened• itrv ot v* 'overnf" liscussed litic-s ifll over ,r, al Mil« have I that I" e-stin''1,1',. erve M ee poij] UK"'1 Vft heDfoJ ■rts, s»*> njiri ,,,»'"'' this Btf A/fl!/' GOVERNMENT LENDING, INSURING, AND GUARANTEEING AGENCIES The Commission studied 104 of these federal agencies which have grown to such magnitude — $244 billion in ■ill — that a broad reorganization has become necessary in the interests of sound operations and economy. It was recommended that certain agencies be mutualized under federal regulation, that hidden subsidies be disclosed to 'he public, and that agencies generally be made self- ppporting. While it is impossible to calculate fully the benefits to taxpayers by adoption of the recommendations, the Commission foresaw ultimate annual savings of $200 million ty requiring that agencies collect their administrative Senses from their borrowers or other beneficiaries, by ■"posing on borrowers on future loans interest rates '''I'laling the cost to the government, and by requiring 'Sencies operating with federal funds to surrender government securities held by them to the Treasury in return for ,ln non-interest-bearing credit. One anticipated result "'ould be to restore the "control of the purse" to Congress. m its appraisal of the various agencies, the Commission '""id that with relatively few exceptions they have ^eloped methods of organization which assure integrity, efficiency, and great public service. They have made great tf"itiil)utious to national security, to the strengthening of '''"' economy, and to the standards of living of the American people. , The- Commission proceeded on the assumption that ending or guaranteeing loans is a function which the °°vernment should undertake only when a private enter- ^ris<- cannot or will not perform the function, and then n'v in furtherance of a justifiable governmental purpose. there were forty-eight recommendations made in this rPartment. FEDERAL MEDICAL SERVICES wee federal agencies —the Department of Defense, 5 Veterans Administration, and the Department of faith. Education, and Welfare — account for more than Per cent of the total federal outlays in the health ,, '' medical category. The Hoover Commission charged I F the whole medical program is carried out under a ""'I'lsoini- system which breeds inefficiency and huge B*e. Federal operations which started officially in this ^ on a modest scale about 150 years ago have expanded I " multiplied to unprecedented proportions in recent I '"s- The various departments and agencies have worked W ''I'eiidently, each setting up its own policies and tradi- k ns- serving different objectives and different major ""ns. ""'IX.se-s ;"n, 0sts of these varied sen ices in the fiscal year 1954 I '"""t.-el to $4,149,000,000, including $2,030,000,000 in iltV'''ilitv allowances. For 1955 the outlay was estimated H27(),000,000. r'li. T|«-n> u ere twenty-nine recommendations in the Com- \(iS.""ls report, with emphasis on a proposed Federal in.,}""""> Council of Health. Its suggested duties would E '"''- studies and suggestions for coordination, elimina- W k°^ duplication and development of over-all policies L "'-iltli and medical agencies in government; for ade- ij" '' health manpower and hospital facilities; for system- Er^oss-servicmg between agencies, and for training and °tlOn of medical stalls for all agencies. Aci's Fobum News, May, 1956 WATER RESOURCES AND POWER A clear and comprehensive policy declaration by Congress on the country's water resources is imperatively needed to assure their optimum use and their maximum contribution to the national economic growth, strength, and general welfare. This particular report reflected what was perhaps the most far-reaching of all its task force studies. The group wrote its findings in a three-volume compilation, with fifteen recommendations. The Commission proposed that the present Committee on Water Resources and the Interagency Committee on Water Resources be transformed into a Water Resources Board, to be located in the executive office of the President. This new board should be presided over by a non-government chairman and would include five public members chosen for recognized ability in this field, as well as Cabinet members. This board's primary purpose would be to determine broad policies for recommendation to the President and, with his approval, to Congress. It should have the further duty to devise methods of coordination of the agencies both at the Washington level and in the field. The federal government should assume responsibility when projects are beyond the means or the needs of local or private enterprise. Also, the government should take account of the rights and laws of the separate states concerning appropriation, use. control and development of waters within their boundaries. Task force members made on-the-groiind, detailed investigation of more than two hundred power, navigation, irrigation, and flood control installations. They held public hearings in five cities where representatives of various interests were heard, or statements filed, from thirty states. The views of thirteen governors and sixty- four other state officials were received. The public was represented by fifty-two development and conservation associations, three engineering associations, twelve agricultural associations, fourteen labor unions, twenty-two public power utilities, twenty-nine private power utilities, thirty-one business associations, together with fifty other associations and individuals. The task force's work included examination of congressional and departmental reports, laws relating to these problems, and historical backgrounds. Irrigation policy, flood control policy, and navigation policy, the task force found, have been separately conceived and separately administered. The report pointed to the absolute necessity of coordination of policies and administration of water resources, and stated many of the costly projects could not be justified economically. During 130 years through 1954. the federal government appropriated about $14,300,000,000 for water resource projects. Those projects now authorized bv Congress will cost about $18,494,000,000, making a total of about .$32,800,000,000. The- water needs e.f the- United States are expanding. The total increase expected during the next twenty-five years i.s estimated by the task force to be equal to the additional supply of 147 New York cities, requiring the flow of about eleven Colorado rivers. The Commission urged that our national policies must provide for the development of our water resources. The task force stated that there is no present or prospective need for federal financing of power activities. Moreover, federal power development is not necessary to supply whatever power may be required for current and prospective defense activities. Vet, our national policy Page 33 V ing I"
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