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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
File 034
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 034. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1293.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 034. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1293

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 034, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1293.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 034
Transcript 1 ^Ml ■^■MB - Post exchanges and commissaries sell goods and services at or near cost to the government, often underselling even wholesalers because they often buy direct from manufacturers. They pay no rent for either warehousing or selling space; the salaries of military personnel whose services are often utilized are not charged; no account is taken of wastage, spoilage, theft, or depreciation. No interest is paid on the government investment. The enterprise pays no federal or state income taxes. The Commission calls the right to buy at these substantial savings a "fringe benefit" to government employees and recommends that where such benefit ought to be given, it should be paid in the form of additional salaries. Except in isolated areas, post exchanges and commissaries should be liquidated. The Commission says 1,000 of the business facilities operated by the Defense Department could be eliminated without injury to national defense. Most of the government enterprises were begun in war time; nearly all the others were created as temporary agencies to meet the depression; but in virtually every case, when the time for liquidation came, the bureaucracy — supported by the benefited individuals, pressure groups, and communities — found excuses to continue the enterprises. Medical Empire: The federal government already has assumed partial or total responsibility for the medical care of thirty million persons. Hospital facilities costing one billion dollars are used for the care of veterans with non- service connected illnesses. The annual expense for non- service cases is half a billion dollars. Some veterans' hospitals, because of unwise locations, still lack patients, cannot be operated efficiently and should be closed. Others are over-crowded. The government maintains 381 facilities in the United States for manufacture and repair of medical and dental supplies. Private industry has both the ability and the capacity to meet the requirements now being supplied by government activities. For 19.54 the varied federal medical services involved the employment of more than 6 per cent of active medical personnel in the country. In 1953, the last year for which full figures were available, the 7.000 hospitals in tin- country were shown to have 1,573,014 beds, with 200.535 in federal institutions. GOVERNMENT COMPETITION WITH PRIVATE ENTERPRISES Although it is the declared congressional and executive policy to foster free enterprise, the federal government is competing with private business on a wide front. Investigation of federal business in competition with private enterprise was required by the Act creating the Hoover Commission. One of the major problems is the continuation of government enterprises after the emergency that engendered tin-in has terminated. Because of vested interests, misleading or incomplete accounts, or other reasons, some of these enterprises have established an astonishing longevity. These enterprises include shipbuilding and ship repair yards, peacetime transportation in aircraft and seagoing vessels, commissary stores and post exchanges, bakeries, coffee roasting plants, meat cutting plants, laundries, dry cleaning plants, tailor shops, clothing factories, dental Page 32 manufactories, dental manufactures, watch and jewel' I repair shops, and many others. The Commission recommended the gradual liquidation of the postal savings system; deposits have declined stead Hie ( ily since 1947. *hich 1 The Commission raised questions as to permitting th '' ~ tha Tennessee Valley Authority to continue to produce al* fte into sell fertilizer in competition with private producers. It re' ecomme ommended that TVA discontinue chemical research ai* ,fc'era' ; that its fertilizer research facilities be transferred to tn1 "e pub Department of Agriculture. The Commission noted th' Sl,Pporti the government had disposed of its other World War ' While nitrogen and other chemical plants. Pxpayer One of the principal recommendations of the Comrni' [mission sion was that all public laws which require or permit th ty rcqu Armed Services to engage in business operations whic flH'nsos can be performed by private industry be reviewed a"1 ""posinc amended to enable private business to supply militat ^Haling needs to a greater extent. The Commission acknowledge Sencies with commendation that, while its report was being prf "^nt set- pared, the Department of Defense reviewed its own offer1 an non-: to reduce competition with private enterprise, with »• *°uld b< result that ninety-seven facilities in twenty categories w# In its : either discontinued or scheduled for discontinuance. Tt" '°Und tl action of the Department is rated as most construct^' '•evelopei Huge air transport fleets in 1954 carried 3,900,000 p;li ^c-iencv sengers, besides 4,784,000 military hitchhikers, the to» c«ntril,ut cost of which was $204,400,000. The large majority of * <jUr Ccoi transport paralleled the routes of established private a" ^"leiicau lines. At the same time, Congress was subsidizing ma" The C of the private airlines, by payments for carrying mail 0t""liii._r < tov i'lis i-iiiiiii build up the- strength of the commercial airlines, tM equipment and personnel, for time of war. The Mil'1'1. Sea Transport, in 1954, operated 221 ships carrying m" °nh- in (, than two million passengers and 23 million tons of caff Tl,,.,,, with operating costs of considerably more than halt billion dollars, while Congress subsidized the private ffl chant marine with a view, among other things, to Pr°vl, ing a fleet for military emergencies. Much of the caf and traffic (from both air and sea transport) could 'iiie-e- diverted to private carriers with probable economy to ."' Vete a 1 - _.. At .■_ _ _r i_. ,oi » '11';,In ,. gpvernment and a strengthening of wartime reserves both branches Due to the distressed condition of the private ship'"'1,', .rr ,'...1. ..-A ., 1 »1 ,-r in... M«n(llln« « ^« ,1 , ,,-,'l 1 ing industry and the serious competition engender©" government shipyards, the private industry i.s weaken^ j a war reserve. Congress should appoint an indepcf"'„ Commission to shidy the effect on the industry of , construction and repair of naval vessels in govern111 shipyards. The Subcommittee on Business Enterprises discusse0! length the problems of 288 large industrial facilities i"'■',. military departments which were mostly held over &\ World War II and now constitute the National ^fj Industrial Reserve. Beyond these, 148 plants have Indisposed of to private enterprises on conditions that 1 tect the military interest. The government investmen « about $9 billion; annual maintenance of the reserve P1 J are in excess of $200 million. The subcommittee P01IL) put that six of the plants disposed of have paid more > $100 million in taxes during a six-year period. The De* j' ment of Defense, with the aid of outside experts, sh * review these plants as to their value, future require!" and possibilities of disposal. J There were twenty-two recommendations in this p" from the Commission. 1$ Facts Foiium News, May. S(' can feartme Tl, J'ahli. ,, I per <-, Kd m«li ,;'t the i Kerso, K Fe P? °n a E '"""i ,r-Tii< '"pi-1,,1, "Is. 'Dose L«.270,( Eton's , iWs0rv , stl « ''ll % '"''hi, ft* heal fe <*oss-s "t,"m «, 'V s Fob
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