Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
File 033
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 033. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1292.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 033. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1292

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 033, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1292.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 033
Transcript How to Save $7.5 Billion a Year v A CONDENSATION AMERICANS present a curious paradox toward the service of government. It is the biggest single class "of service they "buy." Its magnitude exceeds the out- Put of several major industries combined. tet government appears to be about the only service °r which the American people seem willing to pay two 0r three times the fair price. Just how "over-priced" is the federal government in Particular, has been indicated by the voluminous studies ' the Hoover Commission, officially styled "Commission n Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government." Tin- waste that could be eliminated amounts to a ^'nimiim of seven and one-half billions of dollars a year! , «he Report, the result of a collection of one million ,acls, exposes the never-ending, power-grabbing, empire- "i'ding expansion of the executive branch of government ""'ar beyond the intent of Congress. . 'he waste and duplication described will baffle your agination — unless you have been an on-the-scene lerver of the bureaucratic octopus. The official Common and Task Force Reports — thirty-eight volumes "taim'ng three million words — are jampacked with apples of reckless expenditure. Just a few: 'he Army has a 10.6-year supply of women's wool serge , "Pe uniforms. The Navy has an 8.1-year supply of blue ■Users and enough blue (not dress) jumpers to last for '"M'ears. he Navy has enough canned beef and gravy and . nned ham chunks to last six years and seven months, '""ii, e of it bought in 1948; enough canned hamburger — e bought in 1950 — to last sixty years. Random checks of "supply items in common use and "y obtainable from manufacturers" showed that mili- '"lel ^ depots stock many such items sufficient lor a twenty thirty-vear supply and even in one case a 128-year Tlly' ij e total inventory of ten "standard items with multiple Ij. s and easy to manufacture,"1 selected for study at Rari- v ^rniy Stock Control Point in New Jersey, represented av'erage 32.6-year supply. w rj0 Orehouseland: The warehouse problem is so stupen- ejT s aid the inefficiency so great, that the government Ho " t know what it has in storage or where. Often one Ml' P' k semng at a few cents on the dollar something lo /• another agency is buying — perhaps at a premium •J'hiin instant delivery. Ij). e government owns or rents warehousing and storage loj,e equal to 31,000 acres. The operational cost amounts in j '" billion a year. Office space owned equals the space ^j~50 Empire State buildings, 'tw e task force discovered more than 100 million square ^,0' space not even listed in the operating records. ■a * government owns 838 million acres of land of which Million acres are in continental United States. The ♦Of, s Forum News, May, 1956 latter portion equals one-fourth the area of the 48 states. Real estate holdings exclusive of the public domain cost more than $40 billion. Surplus Sales: For years to come, the government will be selling some two billion dollars' worth of surpluses annually for five to seven cents on the dollar, unless business-like selling methods are adopted. These sales go on all the time because- material is continually becoming obsolete or the supply periodically exceeds the demand. The pool of material, estimated to be worth $155 billion, is scattered all over the world. The Task Force on Paperwork Management found that government red tape is forcing private business to produce more than a trillion words and figures annually and is rusting executive agencies as well as industry hundreds of millions of dollars in expense that would be unnecessary under an efficient and simplified paperwork system. Heavy as is the cost of paperwork to big business, it is well nigh unbearable to little business. Four million small businessmen must spend from 5 to 29 per cent of their time compiling reports for the government. A sample of bureaucratic stupidity is a questionnaire asking for the answers to 106 highly detailed questions from firms making but one product in the apparel field. A larger number of the 4,700 reports demanded from business firms duplicate information that has already been furnished to "another bureau clown the hall." Great quantities of records are called for which are not used and sometimes are not even filed by the government. Some business firms refuse to answer questionnaires and the Commission found that often the refusals were never even noticed. Financial agencies of the federal government (that investigate, guarantee, or insure I have a capital of $16.9 million. These agencies in given circumstances can further draw on the Treasury for an additional $14 billion. Their legal and moral liabilities aggregate $244 billion, only about $34 billion less than the legally-admitted public debt. Borrowing on long term by the Rural Electrification Administration costs the so-called local "cooperatives" only 2 per cent interest. This is 1 per cent less than it costs the government to borrow to lend to REA — with nothing addi'd for administrative expense. Under the Federal Housing Administration the government has backed $18 billion of mortgage loans disbursed by banks and other lenders. Savings banks keep a reserve for losses of 6 per cent; the FHA, 2 per cent. The Department of Defense alone has an investment exceeding $15 billion in commercial-industrial facilities ranging from shoe repair shops to clothing factories, from cement-mixing plants to sawmills, from chain stores to tree and garden nurseries. Page 31 1
File Name uhlib_1352973_v005_n005_033.jpg