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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 009. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1268.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 009. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1268

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 009, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1268.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript i freedom e' tion. ed to he-long isevelt sail ould nev« ion. "That uchliketb >or.' can, ovd lomic cris' ,{ vital mi" stall trai* en, works' x-rship in, -dominafl ible to <>"' re not W ion lead loyal An| lent has! til those ompubrl can wen*' to such, ,-it his P tveboanj ir of re/% an Willi - I-:, s. i" 1 Rigbi in an ■d on did* mes anom type ofj| .il princiPl Ol lOllll'", under Wjl ,-<■ sacrtfi ■go"' id our ctf ll.'f 7U (Continued from Page 5) that sin.t The advantages of a union are manifold. For example, the union hall is, *n certain industries, to union workers ^hat the employment office is to others. . . . Aside from every Other consideration, the union i.s essentially the only vehicle through which the employer can gfcfuit the labor force he needs for a specific contract. It is virtually impossible for 'he employer to get workers of the require skill from the labor market at large . . . •Skilled craftsmen cannot be secured expeditiously in any usable quantity unless fhe union directs workers to a particular |°h. This direction may involve the labor '0rce in a particular craft for a whole PS^On, as when several thousand iron Workers are needed on a large-scale proj- pfc It is impossible for the contractor to 110 this on his own or even with the assis- J^ce of the United States Employment pVice unless the union recruiting ma tin* .. e and 4 ■ations rfU ol 4 one-Mf ni/ed. I oee-iof. i gain ^ irther: ee.iH'11; .1 l11 ■s ana others. L history ■ mean» 1 iquitot^l the »'">• whole"! list i1'"1/ moraliCi incipWJ ■d on H lord 2J1 Sol ■ Winery is utilized.13 As for the worker in a union shop *"o doesn't join the union, yet who '■'ps all the benefits which the union <C|nes for its members, he is known Jj a lice rider and a ehiseler. He is .''"Ping where he has not sown.18 This Comparable with a man living in a 0rnnium'ty and refusing to pay taxes, s his neighbors have to do. r 'la- non-union employee might be ^"ilcd as parasitic. He spins not, ,'!' neither does he weave, yet he S'°ys all the union-bought benefits. k "'s<'. setting a bad example, other 0rKers might follow in his path. Few j?" want to pay for industrial citi/en- 'P privileges if they see that they 5,gPt them for nothing. c r'ide unions not only need dues to i^ ry on their work, but they need lM participation to discuss issues jt| Pass on them in elections. Only f "n's way can a democratic union nation. • Hr ny ""ion members maintain that ,, 's<' who do not see the "light," have \s'.l;llive stupii "lo workers in non-union shop: S" Vk lew. as losing his pants, literally, his ' .Gonial might well be phrased illative stupidity of 100"per cent. 0 than one has got the "word" he awoke to the fact that all and no pay was making him a e-*Oy. Indeed, when he discovered \l(t\l- twt r"'('r- Clarence Darrow once re- <^ed tha lat there can be no right to C"t £■«, ■"':> i-io\,-v u-i I et <.e,,.. ;n r-' """imi,., »ess, 1st Revisions" Hearings, U. S. Labor and Public Welfare, Session, Pari I. pp. 504-5 U Toner, The Closed si,oik p. 169 work without a place to work. It is the right of management to go out into the labor marketplace and bid for workers on any terms they choose. A man's right to work is at all times contingent on his being able to find someone who will hire him. And even then he may well be refused this "inalienable" right on the slightest pretext. Unions do not claim that there are not abuses of the union shop and closed union. However, most unions are against discrimination because of race or color or creed, and they try to prohibit this discrimination by others.14 Actually, some unions are not in favor of a closed union. Walter Reuther made the following statement: ... In the UAW-CIO we have never asked for a closed shop. . . . We endorse the- principle of the closed shop because in certain industries we- think it is essential. In the maritime industry, for example, we think that the close-el-shop and the hiring-hall arrangement is essential because of the nature of that industry. However, we think that the approach ought to h<- to meet the abuses rather than to outlaw the principle; I personally think that it is wrong for a union to have- a closed membership in which they attempt to build a labor monopoly, in order to exploit the advantages of a non- opoly. ... I think if yon had legislation which said, "We will give labor a certain period to clean its own house and to make- these corrections itself," and it failed to do it you might then have to have corrective- legislation; that i.s a better approach rather than Outlawing the principle of the closed shop even in those industries where there are no abuses.11 There are those who would have the worker believe that he is "smothered" by bis union, that he has no "77ee' Cri.se' AgOStUt "fligfct-to-WOT*" LOWS, peile- lishe-el lev CIO 1 dated. ''"'Iiift-llorlli-ii Art Revisions," Hearings before ilic Committee on I.,il>e,r and Public V\V!l;ere>, u. s. Senate. S.'inl Congress, Isl Session, l't. 1, pp. 410- 12 i 1953). protection against union abuses. This has no basis in fact. Not only does the worker have a voice in his representative union, but he has available to him remedies in the courts and the National Labor Relations Board."1 Additionally, not only can the union member take part in tbe policy making of his union, but he has the opportunity to elect the men who negotiate with management. Moreover, under the Labor-Management Relations Act, employees can vote in a new bargaining agency if it does not reflect their interests. A paradox of the Union Security and Section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Law i.s that the states' rights tire operative when a state wants to apply more- harsh restrictions. But these states' rights are not operative when a state wants to apply more libera] standards of union security.17 When the Taft-Hartley Law was being debated in Congress, Senator Wayne Morris made the following statement: Thus, we lay down in the hill a very full and complete national policy as to closed- and union-shop agreements. At the same time, the hill provides in Section 14(h) however, that the national policy may he- entirely disregarded and superseded by tlie States if they desire to Impose a more restrictive policy on the same subject matter. A more pointed instance of anti-labor bias could hardly he envisaged than this alleged minor change in the hill.1- To show further advantages of union membership, unions sometimes act in capacities other than collective bargaining. President of Auto Workers Walter Reuther asked Congress to plug a gap in the Social Security Act as follows: (Continued on Page 8) Terminer tJ1(. failure to cover workers suffering from long-term disabilities "the uThe Case Against "llitlht-to-Viink" LalOl ,-tt . p. 89. ,7'/7ee' Case Against "Rtght^o-Work" Laws, lished l.i CIO. not elated, p. 96. "93 Congressional Record 6456 (1947). pub- ■j.,''c'li in time saved mine. Ui(||"' right-to-work laws are often ^>ev °' as right-to-wreck laws. % rr"^'lf he construed as meaning 8 Three-way handshake of George Meany, Walter Reuther and Adlai E, Stevenson in New York City, Dec. Is this three- way 'shake prophetic? Aim: wtuu D PHOTO V ing e A".s I'm in \i News, May, 1956 Page 7 /
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