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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 008. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1267.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 008. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1267

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 008, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1267.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript ■""1 HOTBBM * f^Q (Continued from Page 4) I do not believe the trade union movement of Great Britain can live for very much longer on tlie basis of compulsion. Must people belong to us or starve, whether they like our policies or not? Is that to be the future of the movement? No. I believe the trade union card is an honor to be conferred, not a badge which signifies that you have got to do something whether you like it or not.11 Speaking to the same group, Mr. J. C Gibson, vice president and general counsel of the Santa Fe railroad, said: . . . Compulsory union membership . . . reflects an awareness of a threat to our free way of life inherent in compelling a man to join a private organization before he can hold any sort of job in industry . . . Here, as in every other instance through tile centuries, an attempt is being made to justify the deprivation of individual liberty on the grounds that it is in the best interests of everyone, including those whose rights are being curtailed or taken away. But in this ease, as in so many others, the reasons advanced are insufficient." Fred A. Hartley, Jr., president of The National Right to Work Committee and co-author of tbe Taft-Hartley Act, declared that compulsory unionism is the cancer of the labor movement. To avoid dictatorship he emphasized that our country must stop compulsory unionism. He said that union shop with control of the working man "increases the power of the union leaders over the politicians. . . The drive for compulsion is a drive for power. The demands of some union leaders are insatiable. . . . They want eventually to control everything and everybody . . ."'3 One application for union membership read much like a giant giveaway of tights. Exacting, in essence, blind obedience, it authorized the union to act tor the worker before any committee, board, court or other tribunal in any way that affected his employee status. More, it represented and bound him in the prosecution, adjustment and settlement of all kinds — in short, stripped him of all personal rights and free will. There are eighteen states which have right-to-work laws. Twelve of them have banned forced membership in unions since 1947. Their contention is that these laws protect the rights of their citizens to work, and they may or may not choose to belong to a union, as they prefer. Of those twelves states which have banned forced union membership since 1947. till either match or exceed ""The Right tn Work National Newsletter," Oct.. I1,",. Vol. U No. ',. Washington, D. C. '■Unit. WAvgurta (Ga.) Chronicle, Oct. 19. 1955, Former Representative Fred A. Hartley, Jr., and the late Senator Robert Taft, co-authors of the Taft-Hartley Bill, curbing labor unions. Hartley is now president of the National Right to Work Committee. national average gains in retail stiles, bank savings accounts, per capita earnings, private auto registrations, total firms in operation, and a Dumber of others. These twelve states are Texas, Virginia, Tennessee, South Dakota, North Dakota, Arkansas, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Nebraska and North Carolina (Florida since 1944). The six other states arc South Carolina, Utah, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Nevada. These have passed laws since 1947, and government statistics are hardly significant enough as yet to prove anything. Those in favor of right-to-work laws do not claim that they are solely responsible for the above gains, but certainly the laws were an important factor, they state. Forty years ago Justice Charles Evans Hughes, in Truax vs. llaich, 2.39 U.S. 33 (1915), stated: It requires no argument to show tlt.it the right to work for a living in the common occupations of the community is of the very essence of the personal freedom and opportunity that it was the purpose of the Amendment to secure. The Amendment Justice Hughes referred to was the Fourteenth. Not only are such rights provided for in our constitution, but they are recognized in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, approved by the General Assembly of the United Nations in 1948. Section 1 of Article 23 states: Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favorable conditions of work, and to protection against unemployment. Vrticle 20 provides the following: ""The Legal and Moral n.isi, <>i Right la Work 1..UVS." distributed t>y The National Right ,,, W,irk Committee, Washing! 1). (:.. ,,. 9. 1. Everyone has the right to freedom <>' peaceful assembly and association. 2. No one may be- compelled to belonl to an association In 1941 President Roosevelt sa>< that the government would nev< "Ho The ;i fold. F. >n certa force workers to join a union. "That what th he stated, "would be too much like th Hitler methods toward labor. Powerful labor officials can, ovf night, bring about an economic cris They can stop production of vital liii" erals and metals and can still 1 portation. By the same token, work^ may be forced into membership in union that is Communist-dominate* The workers will not be able to oi'! leaders who they believe are not lujj to our country. These union leaded in the main, are doubtless loyal Affij icitns, but tbe labor movement lias n< been able to weed out all those doubtful loyalty. Thus, compulse! unionism gives the American wortj no choice but to belong to such union; either that or forfeit his j"1 Too, no matter how aboveboaro man may be, it is a matter of recoj w^ . t that later some stronger man vvill r_lJ| lean,.- .., rongl an wsssm to dominate his group. Mr. E. S. ", lard, Chairman, National Right Work Committee, stated in an dress: If a labor union is operated on di4 torial principles, it soon bee IS an"!'" foundation stone in building a type ot I-:t,, eminent operated on dictatorial princfyfl If we do not halt the spread of ~"™ sion in this field — compulsion ot coma under«*l ers. Hon, tl,, bide th tecruit t ('fie con "ie emp s'te skill Skillec Seditious "ie in,„, W>. Tl,,. force in fcgion, . Workers ; ft- It is tl(l this o fence ol •ervice i *inery ij As for J*ures I, I a free ^ping v, rTtoiunii 'His nei .Jh? no iarded •»h| for the "good" of the state (that "<!<** being determined by one or a small grl)l of leaders) —then we will bid our c°j petitivc free enterprise system goofl and sacrifice our freedom on the altar stupidity, management avarice and c° ardicc." Unions, in their publications ' otherwise, do their utmost to run1' workers that a union shop is lor ' I benefit instead of the benefit ol ""J officials. However, tt mere one-fa!: of American labor is unionized, j obvious that the other three-foW feel (hat thev have little to gain >™ unions. Mr. Dillard remarked further: It is neither fair, American, nor c° .. tlltional to place a decision conceoV fundamental persona] liberties and ' vidual rights in the hands ol others. ■ American history and all histor) J proved the principle that "the mean* lies the end" to he the most iniquitoU*J dangerous precept affecting the "|{t ,,: of boil, the individual and the wholeJJ munity. That is the Communist do* I — the doctrine of complete immorallt) J total disregard of Christian prineipl^l the rights and dignity of the indrvid-j (Continued en ''* "■Ibid.,p. II. tin- Right to Work - a ll.isi, VI address by E. s. Dillard, Chairman, Nation' to Work (lommittee. >■ 11,1,1. neitl: sion in tins nelcl — compulsion under "'" : t,~. "v|,i the rights of tl„. individual arc sac■rifi"f lJ°ys all i... ,i... *• i" ..r .1 i.e.. .-.r.xrd v0rt^ .... >want 'P Privi &getth N on Eft .i SV *ho •Jgttve *J0r.VK ^than V ho,; Cas los ,Sli ,„ freeman Irk"<l tha K'&«arll, WjJ-ongress Page 6 Fa( is Fori vi Ne1 May. 4 ■i/"""' i.. ■v. S P, 'lilt
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