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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 007. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1266.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 007. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1266

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 007, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1266.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript s, and tha :o violent] d with the' vanting ' wish to t( ;t some ert workers 1> The coin But \-\Q\t strong th' e law; the nayors aj1 ic authorit spends \v pends gr« isks. Yet ie fact * losing the t to the T# •ction kno»< states' rifl Work Ll in all eifl leaders, rei" litieal po^ CIO UM* incnilnieat jress . . ■ | .ord H E Appeal ore a Pi nerican " lough 4 ies provf bargain' the cl<* ight to 4 berofsl lis, he pi unals «4 ourts ot' d. He 1* union ■ saiel to 1 emselveH But they' negotiate without %» (Continued from Page 3) Unions from extending. They hamper ln any one ol a large number of ways. *n actuality these laws are conducive jo low-wage incomes. And, as such, '"ey have a bad effect on the entire JpTOmunity. Low wages mean low Iiv- ">g standards.4 State right-to-work laws involve, of "ffse, states' rights. In essence, states' "Slits means an issue of governmental "Uthority between the federal gov- °n»neiit and the states, with the states ^intaining that the issue should be SeWed in their favor. The entire thing is a matter of erminology. For example, states' J8«ts as such in labor relations merely ~*sguises. Essentially, these rights v°uld empower the states to add state ^'fictions to those of the federal law; *9 would be in addition to them.5 JJ should be obvious to all that a '"'until economy requires national ,j'"""mic policies. If all states adopt I Iht-to-vvork laws, there might well /forty-eight different laws. National /"•s buy and sell in the national in*" MultiPlant firms. witl' Plants 0r Prions states, might well run afoul D ,a seeminglv nightmarish hodge- ] '"'* of industrial relations. Mix state Jj*s with an additional federal law. ~ "ic nightmare would become real. n A favorite argument of those pro- tej nt -i..kt Aa. ...„-l. 1 :., f]iat "ents of right-to-work la- j,,;"'"' needs no union security. If his tin, es"'t come up to his expecta- ill)'s- or if the working conditions are ii(|S'",slactory, or if there are any i,,,''' "i.unbers of wavs in which he is ES?PPy with his job - why, let him lL»'i et 'lim move on to another job ^ he likes better. Stv s ls a ridiculous philosophy. A &ep"S Wor'cer knows he will find no tnaf.ner pastures over the next hill, no \Vj,,er how many hills he crosses. %, "ut "nion strength to bolster his tw falls jhasJs 011 the ma" :>hasis of left opjj v clepr'v' j should "J ,uldaH?.i :1j %r Punv might, he could wait for- ■Iiision "• quott^l ,qofthj is, as s-1 ted on ?» led Tf'p Herein Mor.l*J . \.,i""1 S,.„sl,-ll'''' ). c. Mini- ti,,j '"r tin indulgent management to HjI1pro,,nci to giving him some of the tlijv"s he believes he deserves. Bui '%. Worker's weak cry, joined with e;>sil c,!(s- combine to form a shout %s^ distinguished by the sensitive (t?' management. 'ti,,,15 extremely easy for a high-sal- % executive to be objective about 'Hi' its "^ workers —he is on the H^e looking out. But what of the H() ° 's °n the outside looking in, vl;j|| 'n''>' lack the formal education or '(Y '''(essary to bold down ;i lire- knows %\y I'ob? Perhaps thi '"' trade-, and it would work a '■able hardship on liim and bis "'M,l •f Against "Rtght-to-Work Laws," pub- vOngMss eef Industrial Organi2Aaonl not wipe woiei.n photo Secretory of Labor James Mitchell. Mitchell, at o CIO national convention, defended compulsory unionism and condemned state laws prohibiting such o policy. lamily to quit his job and move to another location. Motives for having right-to-work laws are legion. States often pass antiunion laws in order to attract industry their way. By maintaining a low-wage area, thev think they can lure industry their way by an anti-union Circe song. Industry which does this can make tt "killing" by manufacturing in a low- wage area and selling in a high-wage area. For this reason, perhaps, the South oilers considerable inducement with its right-to-work laws. This may be a contributing factor in the increasing industrialization of the South. Also, the absence of anti-injunction laws may be a factor in the growth in southern developments." An editorial in an Oklahoma newspaper stilted that Texas and Arkansas are attracting around ten times as many industries as Oklahoma. It stated, further, that these states had no more to oiler industry than Oklahoma — in fact thev were inferior in some respects. The reason advanced for this was that Oklahoma doesn't have laws assuring industry that unions will not impede- them. The article pointed up that Oklahoma couldn't compete with its neighboring states, nor with other states which had right- low oik legislation.7 That right-to-work laws are low- wage laws is more or less self evident. Our nation is in need of a high wage economy. Our country has had an all but unlimited productive potential. But more important is the niainte- - I ,l„,e Factors In lie.- Industrial Development e>f the South." Southern Economic Journal, October, 19S1, pp. 21)1-112. a tod in okl.il ut Slale- Industrial Union Council, CIO, A Legal, Economic and Statistical Survey of So-CaUed "Right^ro-\Vork" Legis&rhvon, P. 16. l'is 'Oruw News, May, 1956 nance and increase of consumption. If we do not have employment at high wages, we cannot find buyers.8 A depression cycle comes when wages fall and consumption subsequently falls. The states themselves bear out this tenet — high-wage states are prosperous, and low-wage states are not. Further, the tenet is borne out by countries of Europe. Italy and France, even with the United States' aid, are always having economic difficulty. England has fared better because wages have climbed. According to law, it is the union's responsibility to see that there are peaceful settlements of grievances, and that the work is carried out. Surely the union cannot do these things adequately if it does not have full control of all the workers and can insure management that non-union members won't stop work, violating the union workers' contract. Also, to those who criticize the power of unions, they must realize that unions have to have power to discipline workers who violate their contract.' Thus, if there is a minority of non-union members, they may well keep the union in hot water. The National Planning Association pointed out that employers saw advantages in bargaining with a well- disciplined union, and were prone to encourage workers to join such an organization.10 When the union has a closed shop, there i.s elimination of friction to a marked degree. There is no competition between diverse labor groups. No two or more unions will be working the same side of the street, so to speak. The result of such competition would be unrest among the employees. Management, too, would suffer from such a situation. With a closed shop the union would be in a better position to bargain with management. It would not have to seek to impress the workers and subsequently get them to join the union by showing how strong thev were by wangling new concessions from management, A strong union, firmly entrenched, would not have to be constantly proving its strength. Its strength would already be a matter of record. Also, it would not seek new advantages when business conditions did not warrant it. Too, the workers themselves would feel that thev had a persona] interest in their jobs, inasmuch as they bad a voice in their working conditions." (Continued on Page 7) -llo- Case Aaainst "Righi-to-Wotte" Laws, peih- lisbed by Congress e,f Industrial Organizations, not dated, p. 29. 'Golden cv Ruttenberg, Dynamics of Industrial Democracy, p. 212(1942). "Causes of Industrial Peace Under Collective Bargaining - Fundamentals of Labor Peace, p. 74 1953). "Studies in Personnel Policy No. 12, The Closed Shop (1939), pp. 6-7. Page 5 V I
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