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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
File 005
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 005. 1956-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1264.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 005. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1264

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956 - File 005, 1956-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1329/show/1264.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 5, May 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript is EXPLANATION OF TERMS 1. CLOSED SHOP: Employees ore required to be union members ot time of hiring and must remain in good standing during employment period. 2. MAINTENANCE OF MEMBERSHIP: Union members must remain members (in good standing) for agreement duration. 3. MODIFIED UNION SHOP: Employees who were hired before union shop was established will not be required to join the union. 4. PREFERENTIAL HIRING: Union members hired when available. When unavailable, employer may hire other workers who need not become union members. 5. UNION SECURITY: Provided in a union/employer contract that union membership is a condition of employment. 6. UNION SHOP: Employees need not be union members when hired, but must join union, usually within 30 to 60 days, and remain union members through duration of employment. 7. UNION SHOP WITH PREFERENTIAL HIRING: Agreement sets forth thot union members shall be given employment preference, or thot union shall do hiring.4 wtaws Right? 7U iM onistn Is rgumertt' as foil"' ic. Wl"' > force I ,gh wW t interna ,i ■n luntarv sensus tsensUs •long t" "■*".'$ lermit"! ihood- J ;:,<: ihood ., free ^ it-tit. t'ti md rttfl ituti""||f in t"'1' .ing." I ilj <|,u r perVfl ■mberfJ ol aHJ pposd ed.'"1 , ,1 "' 3 With p, l,st.< Jency1 x .11 b«J ederfi iol "iVJ with j| ,or A ■'■""", ton, ' Mttl.h ' say those who contend that right-to-work laws will wreck labor unions, with workers as the ultimate losers. This reasoning is given below: M AGAZINE and press proponents of right-to-work laws, (j.. Working overtime on their to b-ipewriters," have gathered, so |]|t|l"als. not to praise labor but to be- t)) e j1- They would have one believe sjL, 'he labor movement is not respon- hrj' . to a considerable degree for rc>r'^lnS about social and economic ljv rrtls and helping to enrich the ofj of millions of Americans. With hi i" 0<''ous and indelicate phrasings *0\v Pr°P"nents direct attention Va„. . Big Labor, that monstrous (|aj P,ri' which, the ubiquitous "they" o'onl' is siphoning away the life's <*,-,, of democracy, of our American •r„of lifc- t)L explain how unfounded arc the 0e« .s of union security detractors, \ ^ background data about our ■J>lnS cultural scene are important: *Vao*. **as* ^Undred years have witnessed -jV change in types of employment \ i dominant type of business today is 'fijr .i ^e> impersonal corporation employ- t'st^|)].("1San(!s of workers, frequently in tn, ,s,'"ients that are located in differ- Tji^rts of the country. 5 (]j«- '"dividual worker on his own is it ^ *l ct disadvantage in trying to influ- Hge j' C(,nipany's decision regarding his •jt, ' "ours and working conditions.1 V'rj: tl',m' was when the bulk of xf,,rn(iUl Workers were self-employed \ rs> mechanics, etc. They were U ft" 'W |(i--' Worlt Laws," Facts Forum News, t '".Vol.4. '«*, their own bosses: they worked the hours which suited them best. Now, however, culture changes have shrunk rural employment and rural population, and enlarged urban population and urban employment. Some 80 per cent of the present working population consists of those who work for wages. The remainder are either self- employed or are employers.2 In view of the foregoing percentages one may see that four out of five workers are dependent on employers for jobs. And, working for the employer, they are subject to his working conditions and schedules. The individual is. in the main, all but helpless in trying to influence the employer in matters of salary, hours, etc. Without union security he might as well joust with windmills as try to influence Big Management, ffe is forced to accept salary and working conditions which are thrust on him by his employer. He is, in brief, a puppet on a string, to be dangled tit will by a possible big, bullying management, a management which may well treat him with polite inconsideration and be attentively in- differenl to his outraged outcries. This is where the union comes in. Through organizational strength the union speaks for the individual worker and lends the strength be lacks. Through the union he is strong l In Right-to-Work Controversy," Labor's Eco- ttOmtC Itciiiu. I.mii.iiy, 1956, Vol. I. s P. orum News, May, 1956 enough to "stand up and be counted." Tliis was recognized in the Wagner Act. Also, it was carried in Section 1 of the Taft-Hartley Act: Experience has proved that protection hy laws of the right of employers to organize and bargain collectively safeguards commerce from injury, impairment, or interruption, and promotes the How of commerce by removing certain recognized sources o) industrial strife and unrest, by encouraging practices fundamental to the friendly adjustment of industrial disputes arising out of differences as to wages, hours, or other working conditions, and by restoring equality of bargaining power I irt ween employers and employees. The banding together for mutual protection and advancement goes back a number of years. Since the Civil War, farmers have organized into associations and cooperatives, seeking help from tbe government and stabilization of markets. Also, the American Bar Association is another example, as well as the American Medical Association, to which almost all physicians belong. The union shop developed in the printing trade before the Civil War." This, then, is why unions regard the states' rights-to-work laws as an unnecessary evil. These laws prevent (Continued on Page 5) <" 1 lie Riftnt-to-Work Controversy," Labor's Eco- iiniiiir Itirietf. January, 1956, Vol. I. °U. s. Dept. ot Ubor, Hum »i Laboj Statistics, Extent nl Collictii,: Bargasntng awl Union Recognition, 1916. Bulletin So. 909. Page 3 V fs ins I j % /
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