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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 062. 1955-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1251.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 062. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1251

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 062, 1955-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1251.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 062
Transcript UNIMPORTANT TERRITORY? Jusl as. before' the second we,rid war emd their defeat, the French used lo say. "W'liv die for Danzig?" we now have Walter Lippmann and olhers of his kind proclaiming that il would be folly to risk war over "such unimportant territory" as the Quemoys and Alatsu. Neither Air. Lippmann, nor other Sophists of his kind, realize lhat wars are neither waged, much less won or lost, according to an accountant's estimate of the value of a particular piece of real estate. Nor is victory assured to lhe side which has the most "hardware" to throw at the oilier. "Wars are won or lost in the hearts of men." No American who knows and understands the' origins of his country is likelv to question the truth of this remark, made to me recently in Harris- hurg by a Russian who had managed to escape the fate of the thousands of his displaced countrymen in Germany whom we handed over to Stalin to be shot, or sent to slave labor camp- after our victory in the last world war. Rut loo main of us today, having inherited lhe blessings of liberty, have' no conception of what il means to be without them and no realization lhat the price of freedom is readiness lo die for it. A year ago hardly anyone had heard of the Quemov and Matsu islands. Today they have become our Rubicon. The decision lo cross it or lo retreat lies with President Eisenhower alone. This al least i- clear from the wording of the resolution passeel hv Congress on January 28 at the President's request, which authorizes him to secure and protect "such related positions and territories of that area now in friendly hands, and the taking of such other measures as he judges lo he required or appropriate in assuring lhe defense of Formosa and the Pescadores." CAMPAIGN PROMISES VANISHED No one knows the mind of Presidenl Eisenhower; or rather no one knows who w ill make up his mind for him when the choice between peace or war in the Formosa Strait can no longer be avoided. One thing only is certain. The Republican campaign promises of 1952 have vanished like sM(,vv upon the desert's Face. There is no longer any question of "rolling back" the Iron Curtain in Europe or Asia, or of liberating anv one anywhere in the world. Far limn abandoning the sterile "containment" policy of the Truman-Aehi'son era. as promised in the Republican plat- form, the administration now- aims only at peaceful "coexistence" with the So- vie-i empire based, at best, on the status quo, and al worst on further retreats in Asia. Few today seem even to remember that President Eisenhower was ilea teal on a Republican platform which promised lhal: Paste fill It will murk lhe end ol lhe negative, futile, eiiul inune,red polic] ,,t "containment" vs li teli abandons countless human beings tee ee despotism eiruI a.i.lle-s lerrnr- i-m which in turn enables the rulers to Eorge the captives ill!" el sseei(...ll for our destruction. For a few months this wise' anil courageous proclamation of Republican policy seemed le. be more than campaign oratory. Mr. Dulles speeke' <>I em "agonizing reappraisal" of ..ur foreign poucy which foreshadowed an end lo our unconditional aid to those who. like the French, could not In- counted upon lo fight even lo defend their own liberty, much less anyone else''s. —Wide World Photo Chiang Kai-shek (left) toasts Syngman Rhee at reception at Nationalist Headquarters, Taipeh, Formosa, in November, 1953. Man between is Sampson Shen, Chiang's confidential secretary. CAPTIVE PEOPLES REGAIN HOPE 'Ihi' captive peoples of lhe Soviet emniie in Europe, together with the Chinese under the iron heel of communism. regained hop,- and strengthened the resistance forces, thanks to Mr. Dulles' statements concerning their liberation. The workers of Easl Germany revolted in the summer of 195',. and even lhe slaves in Russia's concentration camps went on strike that same year in large numbers, Chiang Kai-shek's forces were temporarily "unleashed" whim Eisenhower countermanded Truman's order lo tbe Seventh Fleet to protect the tear of our enemy in Korea "hy neutralizing Formosa. And on February 25, 1953, Dulles told Congress that the United Stale- "would never be a parly lo any international deal fixing despotism on pea,pie- in Europe anil Asia. On that occasion he also seiid that lhe peoples behind lhe Iron Curtain "have' no ground to -ar that the administration would sell I ii down the river for our advantage." For a brief moment the clouds lifted. and il seemed as if. at long lasl. America would have the wisdom and courage lo win the battle for the world withoul war instead of waiting for the' Communists to acquire the "positions ,,l strength" they need before they can atteick lis wilh the certainty of victory. Soon the bright prospect fa.led. First, the Republican administration "settled the Korean war on terms so Favorable to the Chinese Communists thai they had been rejected a year earlier by the Democratic administration. Next Indochina weis given up because lhe I nil''" Steele's dared neither lo intervene nor lo compel France lo take the measures necessary to defend the colony oul of which she had derived great profit, but to which she refused either to give' self- government or lo defend with adequate forces. During Ihis same period, in spile "f McCarthy's efforts In slop Stassen. the security harriers against trade with the enemy were lowered even while American prisoners of war were being starved and tortured in Chinese Communisl prisons. Under British pressure and because lhe administration nurtures the illusion that trade with Communisl oountries can promote "friendship" anil "peaceful coexistence," wc started permitting our "allies" to export more and more of lb'' sinews of war lo China and the rest of the Soviet empire. Meanwhile Chiang Kai-shek was 1"'" ing more effectively "leashed" than ever before, and Syngman Rhee's army w** being rationed to a two day's supply "' ammunition for fear it might attempt to liberate North Korea. In Europe, according lo lhe same pat' tern, we gave our blessing lo the Paris agreements, which were acceptable to France only because they are design*" to ensure lhat the West Germans shell' neither raise nor equip sufficient fores' I,, ensure a viable defense of F.tirop1'- nor attempt lo liberate East Germany. SOVIET RUSSIA—NO. 1 'ALLY" According to Walter Lippmann. ;' "const, ne live" reading of the Pari' agreements offered "an excellent ha-1." for negotiations with lhe Soviel Union because they provide "for the limitation of armaments in Western Europe. Without agreeing that his adjectiv'e "constructive" is well chosen, one ea" agree with Lippmann's view that '''' Soviet Union should have been hapl's to negotiate, since, according to Dull'" statement of November 30, the puip""'' of lhe London-Paris accords was """ merely to create defensive strength ■•' but to limit ami control thai strength «° that II can never hi' an aggressi'1 lot'ec." Since any attempt to liberate lhe rap' live people's could no doubt he <'""', sidered as an "aggressive" action, ""'■ contrary to the' principles and aim- ° lhe United Nations al ils foiiiiibili"" Iwhen Soviet Russia ueis our dea "ally"), the Paris accords, like the F°f mees.i treaty, constitute in effect •'' assurance to the Communisl tyrant* that they have nothing to fear so I'"1' .is they content themselves with the ''" joymenl of their ill-gotten gains. Sk FACTS FORUM N'EWS, April l9*s ^Ts
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