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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 022. 1955-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1211.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 022. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1211

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 022, 1955-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1211.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript American-made planes in French Naval Air Force. The British (who coined the "trade. -Wide World Photo not aid" slogan) have an average tariff wall twice as high as ours — in addition to outright embargoes and quotas on foreign goods which we don't have at all." The French — who also claim they would rather have trade with us than aid from us — have even higher tariffs than the British. In fact, the French for many years levied high import duties on the goods thai we were giving them. SLOGAN OF SWINDLE "Trade, not aid" has become the slogan of a proposed gigantic international swindle against the American people. All over the continent of Europe. American tax money has built great factories. We have supplied them with American equipment and power machinery. We have taught them American production techniques. In our offshore procurement program, we have even given them profitable, guaranteed long- lerm orders to get them started." For example, let us say that one of our foreign allies does not have an air force strong enough for its own defense'. Mr. Acheson or Mr. Dulles or Mr. Stas- sen or somebody flies over there lo teilk to them about il. They have innumerable closed-door, high-level conferences.'- When the American representative finally comes home, our governmenl proudly announces another great American diplomatic triumph: our foreign ally has consented to strengthen its own air force for its own protection, at our expense. To gel lhe thing started, we build a great aircraft plant in their eountrv give il to them. We equip il with the latest and best fVmerican machinery, and teach them the best American production methods. We then place orders with that plant for the type ami quantity of military aircraft which our foreign ally has consented to accept as a gift. When the planes are produced, they are delivered to our ally, ami the hill is sent to us.12 That is our offshore procurement pro- Page 20 gram. Hut the story does not end there. The Soviets begin to complain. They say they are a peace-loving people, and it hurts their feelings to see our foreign allies building up their air forces. Now our allies, for the most part, would far rather please Russia than cooperate with us. Consequently, they begin to cut back on Ihe production of military aircraft and, with the plant we have given them, slart producing civilian aircraft. But when they produce civilian aircraft they must sell it to someone. And America, eef course, is the richest market in the world. W hat tlie American businessman is being asked, to do is fantastic. He is being asked to continue to pay the highest wages in the world — because neither lhe law nor the unions will permit him lo lower wages to meet foreign competition; he must carry a crushing federal tax load, approximately one- third of which is drained off to subsi- elize foreign industries; ami then he is expected to compete in a free market with his foreign competitor whom he is compelled to subsidize.13 Many of America's giant mass production firms — like the Ford Motor Company are, of course, in favor of abol ishing American tariffs. The reason Is simple: they are big enough to g° abroad and build plants in the low- wage areas of the world. Our foreign aid programs have helped to subsidize their foreign markets. They now want lo reap a double harvest in the Amcri- e em market hy bringing in, tariff free, their own foreign-made products.12 The smaller industries, the little businessman, the laborer, ami the farmer in .America are- the ones who will suffer by lhe abolition of tariffs. Consider a European manufacture! who has a plant built for him will' Ameiiiiui fiinels and equipped with American machinery. He pays his effl- plovees twenty-five cents tin hour. I'1" American competitor, who has the same kind of plant anil equipment, pays h|s employees two dollars an hour, in adne tion lo paying taxes which go to sub- sielizi' tin' European manufacturer. If we let the products of lhal European faC/ tory come into the United Slates tariff' free, the American planl is obviously going in he sei undersold in its ow'" market that il will go out of busines< ami all of those Americans will be unemployed.14 USED AS POLITICAL WEAPON The ideal of world-wide free trade ls beautiful — a Utopian ideal for a 1 "'. pian world. Hut as long as the nation*1 economy of every nation on earth ' under political control, internatioO* trade simply cannol be' free. It is used, by governments, as a political wean"* without regard to economic law. , Consider a recent, well-publicize11 case: President Eisenhower's increasi"- ihe tariff on foreign watches by so(ne 5(1 per cent in 1954. The American watchmaking indnstr) was being destroyed, nol by fair cot"' petition from foreign producers, hui ''• an international cartel, under the co"' trol of foreign governments, with hotf* offices in Switzerland where wate11 making, the principal national industfJj is under political control, enjoying le#* —Wide World Pi"" ( This photo taken in 1944 shows train loaded with weapons, tanks—all made in Anted' war plants—enroute to the Russians under lend-lease. For subscriptions. -,-,- I'eiye- \7, FACTS FORUM NEWS, A ,,,-,/. ''■'• ^■"i ',
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