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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 021. 1955-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1210.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 021. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1210

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 021, 1955-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1210.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 021
Transcript oduc- for By purchasing foreign products, we Would create prosperous dollar markets abroad for the things we produce. We cannot forever continue to sell, if We refuse to buy; nor can we continue giving away the products of ibis nation while refusing to accept payment in kind from abroad. This will serve only to impoverish our people, lower our living standards, and deplete our natural resources. According to Henry Ford, the Ameri- can market could easily absorb another five or six billion dollars worth of foreign goods each year which Would mean more goods for lhe American people. Business would benefit, labor Would benefit, agriculture would benefit, and the general consumer —- that "leans eill of us would benefit.' If we permitted free trade', we ceeulil abandon our foreign aid. which is not °nly a heavy burden for us but is also demoralizing lo nations which want to '"' self-supporting. HIGHER LIVING STANDARD Lower laves al home, together with • greater abundance of tariff-free consumer goods, would mcetn a higher Wandard of living. Free trade offers us a simple sulu- t'on to many of the world's ills. Il ''"e-n t require endless hours of debate '" ihe United Nations, ll isn't even '"'"-s-arv for all nalions to agree joint- v and simultaneously to remove re- •frictions. , \ great nation such as the United 'ates could safely do ii am! thereby *l an example for others to follow. Il u,||ild mil be meddling in the affairs j1' oilie, nations; it would be merely ""king after the best interests of our °»v'n citizens. And instead of being re- —Wide World Photo n6 rne first annual New York Import Show, e-„u"Y. 10,000 items from at least twenty K0rn!ries were displayed. Above, Erro A. snlo)Vaara' commercial secretary to the Con- Hob^ General of Finland, shows Miss Ann British cars reach U.S. market. senlful. oilier nations would be grateful. : -Wide World Photo roundabout way", helps erfS a lion target rifle made in Finland. Acts forum news, April, 1955 That was one side of the question. Here, on the other hand, are arguments of .some who do not think that America should abolish all tariffs. lAJv. cannot intelligently discuss the "trade, not aid" subject without some meaningful comprehension of our aid programs. In round figures, we have given away to foreign governments approximately one hundred billion dollars since 1940.* That sum of money would have built ten million 810,000-homes in the United Stales — a home for one out of every four American families. Or it would have bought a new car for every family in America. Or it could have built fine churches, school buildings, and recreational-educational facilities in every city, every town, every village (every community) in the nation — if it had been left ill the hands of lhe Americans who earned it, to use as they saw fit. INEXHAUSTIBLE SOURCE? This is the reality of our foreign aid programs. Since the beginning of the New lle'eil. many Americans have c.iine to look upon the federal government as an inexhaustible source of money. \e inally. of course, every dollar which our governmenl has. spends, wastes, or gives away represents so much production (labor and effort) on the part of the American people.* Americans — by working, saving, in- viniing. investing produce wealth. Our government seizes that wealth — lakes it away from them by force of hew: takes it out of their pay checks before they get a chance to see it — and then gives it away to foreign governments. The excuse for all of this is that it somehow, America.9 One of the by-products of this strange activity is the so-called unbalanced Irade siluation. This siluation, in turn, has created a new hue and cry for America to abolish her tariffs so that foreign products can be sold here more easily. For years the volume of American goods going abroad has been much greater than the volume of foreign goods coming into America. The unbalance has been caused, however, not by our tariffs but by our foreign aid.8 In one typical year — 1951 — on which some official 1 nited Slates governmenl figures are easily available, we sent abroad American products totaling 82.5 billion more than the total value of all foreign goods brought into the United Stales. The value of the American goods thai we gave away abroad that year, however, was $3.4 billion.* Analyze these figures, and you will discover that in one typical year, the value of eill foreign-made goods which we Americans bought was 8820 million greater than the value of all American g Is actually solel abroad. In other words, \merica is and always has been a better customer for the rest ol the world than the rest of the world is for us."1 Foreign nations like England, which complain that we are hurling them and driving them into the arms of the Communists because we have high tariffs and refuse lo buy their manufactured products, are simply nol telling the truth. The trttlb is thai they have higher tariffs against our goods than we have against theirs. We actually buy more of Ibeir goods than ihey buy of ours.1" Our average tariff rale on all imports is only a little over 5 per cent — which makes us the lowest-tariff major trading nation on earth.'1 I'age 19
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