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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 020. 1955-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1209.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 020. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1209

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 020, 1955-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1209.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript tional — fell into chaotic confusion.4 But in ratifying the Constitution, all states agreed to impose no burden on interstate commerce, and we now have the largest free trade area in the world. It would admittedly be much more difficult to establish a free trade system with the peoples of Europe who belong to ancient and varied races, histories, and civilizations. But it is worth a try. The alternative is more American aid. or reduced exports and unemployment. or both.4 By abolishing tariffs we would demonstrate to the world that we mean what we say about "free enterprise." While screaming about unfair competition from abroad, socialistic industries, and international cartels, American advocates of the "protectionist" tariff are. in effect. Irving to preserve their own brand of government protection and non-competition. We simply aren't practicing what we preach. If we would abandon our tariffs, we would greatly strengthen our own position in urging Europe to abandon restrictive practices and trade policies.3 ECONOMY WOULD GAIN Our economy, too, would gain from lhe specialization and comparative advantage in production to be found all over I he- world. If Australia can produce wool more efficiently than we can, fine. American wool producers can cither increase their efficiency or turn their energies to something they can do better than the Australians producing dishwashers, for example. Then tbe consumers not just the' producers, but all the people, in America as well as in Australia — can enjoy a greater abundance and lower prie-es of both wool and dishwashers. Protective tariffs are an essential feature of the economics of scarcity. They represent |he same economic thinking of the New Dealers who slaughtered pigs in order to protect the pig market. 1 nder a tariff system, production rather than consumption becomes the objective of industry and commerce: and the interest of lhe consumer is sacrificed to that of the producer. In effect, tariffs are an expensive form of priec control. You cannot logically defend tariffs and oppose government controls of prices and wages and other violations of the free-market principle." One of the worst evils of tariffs is thai they furnish a rationale --a justification for a government-controlled economy. They are. in fact, tbe original spring- l.eearel for lhe arguments of governmental controllers and planners. Free trade is a feature- of the economics of abundance, in which goods arc produced to be used. Free trade serves the interest of the consumers rather than the interest of special economic groups.3 Free trade promotes prosperity in the —Wide World Photos At top left, stevedores sort bales of sheet rubber which arrived in New York from Malaya under exchange arrangements of the Marshall Plan. At right, thousands and thousands of tons of coal are shipped annually from the United States to Europe, the Far East, and South America. Lower, warehouseman checks a shipment of a million pounds of potatoes imported from Canada. Page 18 only way possible — abundant produd" lion of goods."' High prices and high wages do not spell out prosperity. A man, or a family. or a nation is prosperous materially when it has all the material goods l' needs. Free trade promotes the highest |"'s' sible production by permitting each region of tbe earth to specialize in producing those things best suited to its climate, ils soil, ils resources, or the ~|>c< ial skills of its people. The infant-industry theory always crops up in arguments for tariffs — the theory thai new industries cannot compete, while in their infancy, wilh established foreign industries. If this theory bad any validity, ■' should be applied domestically as well as internationally. This, of course. wotiW require the government to subsidize every new business venture until someone decides that it is old enough an" strong enough to stand on its own fee' and meet competition. Tariff advocates fear lhal competiti°n with "cheap" foreign labor will drive down American living standards. 'l"te fact is, however, that foreign labor is expensive, rather than "cheap," because it is much less productive than American labor.0 Tbe United States, wilh thc high'*1 wage scales, has the' world's lowest ]''"' duction costs. Il is absurd lo fear th* our great industries would be put oU of business bj competition with foreit-'" industries which are far behind ours •" equipment, efficiency, and capacity '°r volume output. EASY ACCESS TO MARKETS The American producer has the addj' tional advantage of easy access to "'S markets, while foreign-produced go""" musl include the cost of transportati0" half-way around the world. The compel il ion with foreign goon-' instead of destroying our own industrif* should spur them to cost-culling and i"' , ' r.. . ... h , ..„>r eei-,,1 efficiency, which means |nw''r prices to the consumer, which ine:1|,s more consumer purchasing, which me*1" greater profits to the producer. Vmerican tariffs an- as outmoded *• isolationism.1 , During the depression of the l'';,)" many governments tried to find si"''",', behind various kinds of protective tra* • iradf eeli'1' their own industries and achieve "'' tional self-sufficiency. Their "'/"'', failed, and the free world today '" ". difficulty due in pari lo these dis"'r lions of the normal flow of trade , , Close Lies can be maintained "'. other countries only if the econo"1, lies are strong and mutually bencfic"1'| If we would abolish tariffs, we »'"^ benefit as individual consumers 'r" cheaper prices on things we buy. FACTS 'FORUM MOWS, April r'ArTs
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