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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955
File 019
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 019. 1955-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1208.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 019. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1208

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 019, 1955-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1208.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript Id Pholo the Pros and Cons of TARIFFS BY DAN SMOOT One of the most complicated and con- "OVersial problems of today is that of tariffs. The slogan, "trade, not aid," captures atl Unusual amount of attention all over lhe world. The' slogan means lhat foreign nations, which for years have been reviving economic help from us. would 'low rather here trade' with us than aid bom us.' Hie slogan is an appeal to America to lower or abolish all tariffs so that °reign products can more readily be So'd to us here in the United Stales. . A national high school debate topic or 1951 wees the proposition that our .ra' government should initiate a Policy of free trade with nations friend- V to the United States. bet s examine this subject on a fun- ''""iciiial level- thai is. to discuss both ""!';■; of the bald question: Should America abolish edl tariffs?" First, the arguments of those who say -Ye»,» -a it * it ■» !»NCE the end of World War II. Amcr a'i exports have exceeded imports h\ £°out ~ have "aiance by funneling American taxpay- ( s money into foreign treasuries to '■'''le them to pay for our goods. U|ir foreign aid policy is based on five billion dollars a year. We >een able to maintain this un- the realization that our friends in Europe bore thc brunt of a devastating war and that our help is essential if they are to get on their feet and restore production and a stable economy. Hut our foreign aid investments are more than mere charity. As our friends in Europe become more productive and self-sustaining, they become more efficient allies in our system of collective security against possible aggression — and they become better customers for us.2 Prosperous European allies will provide markets which American business and American farmers need now, and may well need even more in the future.2 Now. after having spent billions of dollars and years of effort lo build up the economies of our allies, we are jeopardizing our own inveslment by tariffs and oilier Iraele restrictions which prevent our friends from selling us their products. And we scream if they trade with Communist nations. Obviously, they must trade with someone. If they cannol trade with us, they must either turn their trade elsewhere or permit their newly revived industries to die. We shall thus lose our gigantic investments in European economic recovery and in the economic development of many other areas of the world.3 If we starve our allies, we shall only starve ourselves in the long run — because we are all dependent on each other. That is the blunt but accurate way to describe the economic condition of the free world today. \t present, Britain and our other allies gel American dollars only on con- dilion that they spend on armaments more than they can properly afford. Our dollars are linked lo their subservience lo our poliev in sustaining tbe colel war. This cold war is ruining European nations by forcing them to spend on armaments vast sums which they need for useful investment and for maintaining their standard of living.3 The industrial areas of Western Europe bene developed on the assumption thai they will he able to sell and also to buy in a tolerably open world market, mainly by exchanging manufactured goods and consumer goods for foodstuffs and raw materials from the test of the world. The' indefinite' continuance of military expenditures will be fatal to Europe unless she can enjoy hrisk foreign trade. If we do not permit such trade, we will make it impossible for Europe to earrv her share of the burden of col- lective defense', and we will find our- selves cut off from vital raw materials, sources without which our own economy and our own defense system cannot survive. COMMUNISTS SEEK TRADE WARS Tlie Communists have always looked for trade wars within lhe free world. They have always viewed the free world as an economic unil which they should attempt al all costs lo divide. Economic unification is lhe best foundation for a political union. Look at our own history. The United Slates wees firsl formed as a political union of IS sovereign slates. Initially, it was difficult lo establish a firm union which would protect lhe varied economic interests of 13 different states. Under the Articles of Confederation, each sovereign stale imposed ils own restrictions and trade barriers; and Irade - boib domestic and interna- 'lit *'' forei9n Trade Zone in New Orleans, La. Usual custom restrictions are withheld except on goods shipped through the e<i States. At right, Brazil nuts being dried in the New Orleans Foreign Trade Zone for future shipment to stores in the U. FORUM NEWS, April, 195-5 —Wide World Photot zone to the S. "acts Page 17
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