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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 012. 1955-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1201.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 012. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1201

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955 - File 012, 1955-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1259/show/1201.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 4, April 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript Dan Smoot Poses the Question: DO YOU APPROVE OF IKE'S MILITARY SERVICE PLAN? s- A <S1 Wide World Photo Service America's present Selective Law expires in June. 1955. In his State of the I nion message' em January (>. 1955, Presidenl Eisenhower asked that the draft law be extended for another two years. He also suggested a reserve service plan lo build and main- lain powerful civilian reserves of man- pow er. Pacts Forum's question: Do you approve of Ikes new military service plan? Let's look at the question from two opposite points of view, taking first thc ariiumenls of some who say "Yes." ONE nl lln l.i'st arguments for Ike's military service plan is to be found in his own words in the brief section of his State of lhe I nion message where his plan is formally announced.1 The President said thai his plan was designed to "assure our people not only of adequate protection bul also of a defense that ran be carried forward from year to year until the threat of aggression has disappeared.' Since the 1940 draft act weis passed, we have mei the emergencies ol national defense with compulsory induction for tin regular armed forces ol the 1 nited States. Draft regulations and requirements have' varied, of course, according to the seriousness of the emergency involved." When the Korean war broke oul in June, 1950, we had no real reserve, and ..ur active armed force was relatively small. The result was thai many veterans of the Army. Navy, and Air Force men who had eleeni- llu'ir share of the righting in World Wen- II wen' called back to serve two years more or to serve until they died.3 "FREE RIDE" FOR SOME \\ c reacted to the emergency by increasing selective service inductions, and before long we were- sending half-trained recruits to Korea to fight with the veterans. Hut there were still about two million young men who had become qualified for mililarv -,'rvici- since World War II bul who never served in uniform. These men got whal Preside nl Eisenhower has called a "free ride."'1 This situation could have been prevented if the nation bad listened in 191 I to American military leaders who were laying plans for a universal military training program. Instead, we demobilized at the con- clusion of luesiiliiies in 1915: and no concerted drive lei develop a universal military training program begem until months after the outbreak of lhe Ko- reetn war. Hut. tragically enough, ibis drive was stopped cold in March, 1952. by a sudden, hysterical outburst from a strange assortment of pressure groups all over tbe nation.' In 1951. men uf vision in our Con- gress passed a law approving of I'MT iii principle; but in 1952. when they were Irving lo enact legislation to get lhe program started, they lost courage in the fail' of public pressure einel killed the measure.* Eisenhower's new plan for mililarv service will remove much of the uncertainty which for fifteen years has plagued America's young men. Draft calls are iu,w being cut in half. ihi- means thai draft requirements can In' filled from groups of age 22 or 23. Reduced demand for youths of 21 and younger will mean lhal almost all young men can make their college plans with assurance. The average youth can know lhal he will nol be reached bv lhe draft during a four-year college course-. whether or met he remains in lhe upper levels scholastically." The draft itself will go on. bul in- creases in pay for men win, wish to re- enlist will be an inducement for a regular army career. This uj|1 cul down the drafl requirements.5 Anv young man who wishes to eiveeid lln- draft may volunteer for regular two- year active- service in ihe branch of his choice; en- he mav volunteer for the new form uf reserve training, undergoing active training fur si\ months ami then -rrviiiL' nine anel a half years in active reserve units.0 This active reserve plan will provide' ei reserve force ready lo move out on short notice for limited emergency us,-. P>v 1959, thi- program is expected lo produce an active reserve force of aboul three million men. plus an inactive reserve force of another two million men." While' lhe plan would add lo the COSl ol the reserve program possibly .">50 million dollars over lhe 700 million dollars now allotted the expenditure is justified because il strengthens lhe national defense. And when national survival is ai slake, ii i- ridiculous lo hobble our efforts by penny-pinching. 50 YEARS OF TENSION? President Eisenhower has warned ll"" country thai we are up against a long' period of tension wilh the' Communist world. Ih' s-ivs il may he as much as fifty years. The besl we can hope fur is lo keep a cold war from turning into a hot one dining that long period. Th'' only way we can do lhat is lo keep constantly strong, for any sign of mililarv weakness here might entice tbe Soviets in try an atomic war." Every proposal for anv kind of fair- universal training plan h;.- met wilh tl"' cry lhal universal conscription breeds militarism. Righl now. however, u'" President Eisenhower smiled and -- ( during the ovation for him in the House he came to address Congress with his $\° of the Union message. Behind him are ***.„ President Nixon and House Speaker Rayt* (D-Tei.l. , "Hist I, Page in FACTS FORUM NEWS, April, >"
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