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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 050. 1955-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1169.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 050. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1169

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 050, 1955-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1169.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 050
Transcript RUSSIANS HATE COMMUNISTS , (Continued from Page 24) other peoples behind the Iron Curtain hate, as well as fear, the Soviet government. The trouble is that no one has any hope of overthrowing it without outside help. The fact that so many millions of Russians went over to the Germans in the first stages of the war is a proof of what I have always contended concerning the attitude of the Russian people. Tbe Germans might have retained or won the support of the overwhelming majority of the Russian people had it not been for the stupid and cruel be- havior of the Nazis. We should take care that we do not ourselves make the mistake of forcing the Russian people to support their Communist government by regarding them, instead of communism, as the enemy. Today many of the very same people who have been most sympathetic to communism in the past are busy telling us that we should hate the Russians. They are today, wittingly or unwittingly, furthering the Communist cause by diverting our enmity away from communism as such to Russia. This kind of upside-down Communist propaganda has been so effective that Dr. Ward V. Evans, in his minority report on Dr. Oppenheimer. cited as "evidence" of Dr. Oppenheimer's loyalty the fact that '"he hates Russia." AMERICA HELPED STALIN I consider the breaking off of diplo- matic relations with the Soviet Inion would put fresh heart into the forces of resistance to Communist tyranny behind thc Iron Curtain. It would help to wipe out the impression we created during and after the war that we approved of Communist tyranny. It is a true but tragic fact that at the war's end America and her allies helped Stalin to re-establish his dictatorship in full force over the Russian people. By the many pronouncements of our government leaders. by the attitude of our newspapers and radio commentators, we made it all too clear that we were behind Stalin and that we gave him, instead of the Russian people, the credit for the heroism of the Red army. By turning back uncounted numbers of Russian deserters, displaced persons, and others who knew that they would be shot or sent to concentration camps when returned to the Soviet I nion, we must have helped establish the belief in the hearts of the Russian people that there was no hope to be expected from the West. It is necessary that we do everything possible to wipe out the impression given in the war and postwar periods tbat we are ready to support Communist tyranny so long as that tyranny does not menace us. And nothing Page 48 could be better calculated to achieve this purpose than implementation of the Jen- ner-McCarran resolution. I could quote many statements lev past ami present representatives of the American people showing their misunderstanding of the nature of communism, of its aims and its methods, and of the basis of its terrible power. The past two administrations made repeated statements implying thai we believed that Soviet communism is a progressive pow- i \s late as July 16, 1950, President Truman >aid: "By making possible tbe formulation and execution of liberal reforms such as the nationalization of certain industries and land redistribution, which are desired by a majority of Koreans, this policy should also help to broaden the basis for an understanding with the Russians." I hr only possible meaning which can be read into this statement of Mr. Truman's is lhat the Communists are liberal and progressive and that if we emulate them we can get along with them. In other words, the basic assumption upon which the Truman-Acheson foreign policy was based was that America could insure world peace if we showed evidence thai our economic, social, and political policies are as progressive' a- those of the Communists. The second great illusion about communism which has distorted our policy is a corollary of the first. It is the belief that communism conquers not by fonc and terror, but through popular support. For instance, Mr. Acheson, on January 12, 1950, declared that the best way of stopping communism in Asia was to "develop a soundness and administration of these new governments and to develop their resources and their technical skills so that they are not subject to penetration either through ignorance or because they believe the'se- false premises, or because there is real distress in their areas. If we can help lhat development, if we can go forward wilh it, then we have brought about the best way that anyone knows of stopping this spread of communism." In other words, the Acheson school of thought believes that good works and the redistribution of wealth can stop communism. OUTSIDE HELP NEEDED The third great illusion which formerly permitted the State Department to view Communist conquests, such as lhat of China, with complacency, is thc belief that once the Chinese or any other people learn that communism does not 'jive lhe benefits expected, they can discard it. The fact is, however, that it is impossible for a nation which has col under Communist tyranny to find a «< of overthrowing it without outside hdf It would seem that in spite of all * lessons of the past few years our thin1 ing and our policy are still permeatf with the old illusions. For instance, * June 16, last, President Eisenhower,' opposing the breaking off of all tr** with tbe Iron Curtain countries, staf lhat the satellite countries would W have no place to go but Russia for a"! thing they needed. He further staf that it should be our objective "to * courage the centrifugal forces," ana' implied that this could be done by "J tinning to trade with the Soviet Emp'f The plain fact is, as the Jenner-'' Carran resolution recognizes, that bi"e^ ing off diplomatic and trading relal"* with the Soviet countries would P* weaken the Soviet empire and strenfS" en, not weaken, the ties between us & the Russian people. For it would ?' them hope that the tyrannical i'e$ which rules over them could collar thanks to our pressure. And far fj; hurting lhe people of the Soviet I pire materially, it might help "a The Soviet government is able to ew. only by squeezing ils subjects and priving them of food and other nfl sities while using imports almost clusively to build up ils war potcn"' Consequently, the Russian people those of the satellite countries, far I deriving any benefit from mere** trade with tbe free world, would ■"' probability be hungrier than ever n° It will be fatal should wc listen the contrary advice given by Sir *, ston Churchill and the Americans Soviet Sj stone People of greal '* offe, word, hi 'he erro °f the ] "iimi-l 1 am Perience study 0f strategy, upon us the Am, vvould < among Peoples ""nieasi fanny a, and will There Carly sta as '' die People f, '""i. Tot ;lv''ilal)le ^mrnun t0 heliev P'opaga, advances " offers l'ause ,)(. Egnfiden, We share his illusion that thc . eminent represents the Russian I"'1" and that we can have peace and sefl] by appeasing the Communists eitM the Far East or in Europe. estern Till is "'"'"Ma, wh» hav 'magiiie S'lew " 'I'-atl, *>** b| Votali,. what A Hi,';, 't 1 'Hi ns to nieri, Ver> ...a ls fi RUSSIAN MASSES VOICELESS Those who like and those who the Russians are equally wrong i tn peoj Soviet ining that the Russian people haV* . say in determining Soviet policy , equally dangerous as advisers a- I" American policy should be. e; When I read'Sir Winston Chuf«j statement last summer to lhe N8.'1 Press Club, I was appalled at bis '' ance and tbe bad advice which giving, thanks to lhat ignoranCfj based his plea for a try at "pea"'1' existence" with the Soviet l.ii'l1".' "lhe mood of thc people of Russia on "the great wish in Russia to ",; rien " mem„e ??*•■ s, 'Assures ;,:'""" hi, Peop , 'servie, "the ,. u*uon N,| great wisl better time among the masses people." He urged us to "make 1 lhat the Russian people would n<TJ that they might gain far more \ r-f?nSth b quarter of a century of peaceful de e pena untry" ** to opp0se ai ;.'"•'"- Hi, ITor to I?- rtv- the quarter ol a century ment of their own war. And be 'egged le*« FACTS FORUM NEWS, Februam ^CTS
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