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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 044. 1955-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1163.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 044. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1163

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 044, 1955-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1163.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 044
Transcript age. and the high birth rate will mean that there will be a need for about 400,- 000 additional classrooms by 1960—or a total of 770.000 classrooms more than we have now. The estimated cost of that is five billion dollars. And that doesn't include the cost of providing new schools for those that are now firetraps or antiquated. As it is. (here's a fire in a school building every three hours! And the National Board ol Fire I nderwriters has issued a statement that nearly half of the schools of America are not firesafe. The problem is so great that it is beyond the financial capacity of the states or the local communities to meet it— particularly in those rural states and the southern states where there's relatively little wealth that can be taxed on behalf of the schools. SHORTAGE OF TEACHERS Prof. Norton: I don't object t" some federal funds to meet this emergency situation as it affeds school buildings. However, if I bad to choose between having | r teachers or poor buildings I and I don't think we need to choose). I'd rather have the good teachers. And the fact is that American education has been so severely affected b) inflation and other factors that we now have a shortage of al leasl 110,000 teachers per year. I'd like to see a floor of financial support, without control, put under the education of every American child. From there on, the individual states and localities will build. Gen. Howley: I agree that we should do something to increase salaries of our teachers- all teachers. They're dedicated people, but they still have to raise their families. The average salary—as near as you can get to an average all over the country of schoolteachers below college level is $2,800 a year. And just by contrast, we had many students graduated from our College of Engineering last year who received over $5,000 a year on their first job—more money in many cases than the teacher who teaches them receives. But I don't think the answer is federal support of lhe teacher, because right with it will go specifications as to what the teacher will teach or won't teach, what color his hair will be, and so forth. Prof. Norton: I favor federal aid because it has worked so well in the past. First, there were the very substantial grants made to help found our original public school system, which I think is one of the great institutions of our \incriiaii heritage. Later on. President Lincoln signed a federal bill that established a land-grant college in every state, which has done a great deal to make our farmers upstanding men instead of peasants. Later on, the federal government initiated a program of voca- Paze 42 tional education which stood us in very good stead as this technological age has come on. More recently we've not thought out this problem so well; we've talked too much in cliches, such as ''federal aid means federal control," although we* had 175 years of experience where > hasn't meant control. I think whal need to do most is to apply some w eral aid to the slum areas of AmeriC education. Progressive Education - Good or Bad? "I lliink progressive education is bad," asserted Fordham University Professor Godfrey Schmidt during his recent guest appearance on Facts Forum's ANSWERS FOR AMERICANS program. Law Professor Schmidt, also an attorney, lecturer, debater, continued. "While- 1 have never seen a satisfactory definition of progressive education, as nearly as I can understand it, it seems to be a form of education that relies upon the budding genius of the individual student, which must not be im- paired by any of the artificialities of the student or by any of the rigidities of the traditional form of education. "And I think il has resulted in a kind of diffidence about intellectual and moral principles — a kind of fear of taking positions — and a failure to understand thai moral training is just as important in education as intellectual training. You can't have either intellectual or moral training without certitudes and principles and therefore without a philosophy and ultimately without a theology." Regular panelists on the program of- (ered a wide variety of opinions both as to the definition and value of progressive education. The distinguished trio were: Mr. Devin Garrity. President of Devin-Adair Publishing Compan) ; Professor Charles Hodges of New York Definition from the Columbia Encyclopedia: Progressive education, movement in modern education. It was developed in Europe by Froehel, Pestalozzi, and Montessori and in the United States by Francis Way- land Parker and John Dewey. Postulate'- of the movement are that tti*■ child learns leest iii those experiences which have vital -ell-in terest, and modes of behavior are most easily learned by actual performance. Therefore, education must he a continuous reconstruction of living experience based on activity directed hy the child. The recognition of individual differences Is crucial. Progressive education opposes the formalized authoritarian procedure and fosters reorganization of classroom practice, curriculum, and attitudes towarel the individual student. . . . I niversity, world-traveler and forii* newspaper correspondent; and Geolf Hamilton Combs, network ra<lio-te" vision news commentator and for"* Democratic Congressman from Misso'j' Strongly opposing Professor Schmfl views was Professor Hodges, who f fered this definition for "progress!' education": "I'd say it's education » living. I would say that is does b* principles back of il—that indeed "" of the education in the United St* today is progressive." Speaking 9 his own observation of student-. I fessor Hodges asserted that "prodi* of progressive education have a ^1 liant college record." Still another definition was I'm leered by Mr. Garrity, who finds fl progressive education is comprised) two objectionable characteristics: J is thai they presume to own the "J, child; they presume to tell that 1 how to adjust to his parents, '" Inline, and to what is called 'soci acceptable' behavior, rather lha" I old-fashioned absolutes of rigb' j wrong under the Ten CommandBB The second thing they do is to i's(' schools as a sounding board or &■ means of reforming society at"' world, instead of leaching 'chaaj ism' as they call patriotism- Garrity concluded, "We arc now eating little citizens who will take I places in Ihis great 'one-world' ° morrow." Mr. Combs declined to label |''"' sive education as either good "r "because I don't know what school. are referring to" and defined lhe ,b as "thai system which places ew?., on the greater freedom of the ind'vl. slu,I,ail and the relaxing of. Id "" classic or arbitrary disciplines older patterns of instruction. 0>^ ing with Professor Schmidt's ''""" on theology, Mr. Combs went ° say: "In our country, theology '"',. plan' whatever in our public s,( system. Who is lo judge whal ibj is to be preached? Who is lo dd1'.'' what children shall be indoctrlj with which theologies:'" Moral l'"'1, i- the prerogative of parochial •*■ than public schools, asserted J Combs, and not "I'll,-Willi lee tl"' purposes of education, which ;l,t marilv intellectual." (Contir •d on I FACTS FORUM NEWS, February' Prof lle tau-J **> coll '•tally Poison' i ,.''ects. '"eracy "'I'unn 'Petates, drives „ ., F-duca *Oughi tt|'e||„, sPonsibil 'h<= de,,. d°cs not '""-adise pACTS
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