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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 040. 1955-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1159.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 040. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1159

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 040, 1955-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1159.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 040
Transcript FOUNDATIONS CONTINUE TO BE CONTROVERSIAL facts FORUM NEWS will from time to time print excerpts from tin- explosive Reece Committee Report together with criticism and defense of the Report. The following is from pp. 199-202 of the Report. The criticisms fire from the Communist DAILY worker. The defense is by Mr. Reece. THE EXTENT OF SUBVERSIVE GRANTS During the testimony of Professor I {owe of Yale, Mr. Hay,- of this committee pointed out that, in the case of inie foundation, it had made only forty grants to persons or organizations allegedly subversive and that this was but ,i small percentage of the total grants. Professor Rowe answered thai il seemed to him this was a misuse of statistics. His position was that it was the aggregate impact of the unfortunate grants which was important, not their relative number. The Chairman then suggested that the number of grants did not tell the whole story of Communist infiltration, whereupon the testimony continued: Dr. Row \.. Yes. t lould 1 comment on thai briefly and make a few other comments thai are connected whh this? 1 am (idly in agree ment with the notion that—picking a figure nut of the ait two or three grant- that arc made to wrong people can have a tremendous effect in undoing much of the good that is made Lrj the rest of the 10,000. Again, it is not a matter of every grant being equal in significance. You can't evaluate them in terms of how many dollar- were involved. A small grant made to a person in a critical position where he is going to make a wrong move ami implement the matter can negate hundreds and thousands of giant- made to people who are out on the fringes, the outskirts of positions oi power and influence where the impact of everything they do that may be good will not l»e directly felt in policy area-. Another interesting feature of that is that grants to organizations, it seems to me, have tn be very carefully taken into account when you are talking about the total number of grants. 1 don't quite understand here whethei the grant- to organizations were included in llii- total figure. I'm Chairman. They were not. These are grants to individuals. Dr. Rowe. Of the giant- to organizations, I can only give you the best example that I know of. Those that involved, for instance, the Institute ol Pacific Relations. I don't know what the -um total of the money was. It came from Rockefeller and Carnegie and from private contributions. Mr. Wormser. 1 believe it was something over three million dollars. Dr. How,:. Three million dollars. The grants to the Institute of Pacific Relations, it seems to me, helped to implement a lot of people who did not, in my opinion, have the best interests of the United States at heart. (Hearings, pp. 535, Professor Rowe then proceeded with testimony which this commiitee found to he of extreme importance: Here I want to talk about another item. It seems to me we make a mistake in talking about identifying Communists as grantc- on the one hand, non-Communists as grantees on the other hand. In much of the activity that Page 38 do with identification ol Communist activity in the United States, it has seemed time that we -in- going of} on the wrong track when we limit ourselves to efforts to identify overt Communists, or let us say organizational Communists, people Ufho carry a card or who can be positively identified as members oj •in organization subject to organized discipline. For every one of those that you fail to identify ■and it seems to me we even fail to identify most of those -there are a thousand people who could not possibly be identified as such. because they hare never had any kind of organizational affiliation: hut among these people are many people who advance the interests of world communism, in spite of the fact that they are not subject to discipline and do not belong to any organization. So here again I think your categories, statistically, have to be refined somewhat. line, of course, you get into this area Ol opinion. What constitutes an individual who i- attempting to advance the interest- of world communism? This i- a very controversial subject, but il we are ever to deal with the problem of com- munisl influence in this country or ever to deal with the problem of preserving our -< curity against the world commuui-t con spiracy, this is the critical area. Ihe people who can be trailed and tagged by the FRI are & very, very small minority. They occupy .i very powerful position and'a potentially important one. Rut the people who do the important work are unidentifiable, and if I wi,- planning to infiltrate the United State.-, I would see to it that they were unidentifiable. Here il seems to me you have to set up an entirely different category than the two cate- gories of (lommunists on the one side and other people on the other side. (Hearings, p. 536.) [Emphasis supplied by Committee.] To illustrate the necessity ol making qualitative rath e r than quantitative judgments as to foundation grants, Professor Roue discussed the [PR situation as follow-: ...I would like to add tin- regarding the IPR and regarding the problem of Far Eastern policy. You remember some of my earlier remarks about the state of Far Eastern studies in the 1 Inited Mate- twenty or thirty jreai how I said there wa- practicall) none of it how -oine ol the found,it ion- started to finance the building up and training ol personnel. It seems to me this kind of thing has to be taken into account in evaluating foundation grants, namely, that the area of ignorance in the United State- about Far Fa-tern matters was -i great that here WU the strategic place in which to strike at the security of the United States by people interested in imperiling our security and fostering the aims of world com muni-m. They would naturally not pick the area in which we have the greatest intellectual . apacities and in which we have the greatest capacities f'.r defense. They vould pick tin area of greatest ,ml.lie ignorance, with the greatest difficulty of defending again-* the lactic- of their attack, and so these people naturally poured into Far Eastern studies and exploited this area as the area in which the) could promote the interests of world communism most successfully in the general igno ranee and blindness of the Ameriean people So that it is not only quantitative evw tion that counts; it is not only the number* or the amounts of grants; it grant area- in which the grants are given significant Here, von see, it seems to nif' lakes a great deal of subject matter kite1' how quite apart from dollars and ceil people and their affiliations or lack thofl to evaluate the impact on this country W ^ given foundation grant—I don't rare whetn*: it is 150 or $5 million. It is a quality matter. Ib-re is where judgment come- in I where the greatest possibility of disagree^™ and controversies lies but where, it seeffifl f you are going to do an evaluating] me. i on foundation activities you are going to li.r to make up your mind with the best help r can find just what the meaning of the gran was. (Hearings, pp. 541, Trl2.t SUBVERSIVES FED TO GOVERNMENT We have described briefly elsev/H the extent to which the ^overnmei come to rely upon foundations ■" foundation - supported organizations , provide "social scientists" for iesear, and in advisory capacities. The vn<j subject deserves deep and careful -"'"i and analysis, particularly the part "'h' these foundations and associated m'Jr izations have played in infiltrating gf crnment with subversives. \ shock1" example of this was disclosed testimony of Professor Kenneth grove. Professor Colegrove testified conc^J int.- the appointment of political ^, sors to the occupation forces at end of the second World War. In I as secretary of the American Pofl Science Association, he submitted ■ of names of experts for the Arm\ "' . ">,e'e km ">em pre were ext 1 wen gainst a TDazenie v."ed ane "lem we I «'anl tl lhat «<J Tom, fr,0«> the I'hasis s P- 561.) Profess 5.">er Us, '»uncil , Tactions the IP '•earned '.'an Poll 'Snored. , ''And Genera ''We coi sent to affairs, receive a"d sort 1,1 Hie f, ,ng. p. 'I" the P cupation in Japan and for tlial i" many—a list of political scientists would be helpful to the povernf i While he did not put hi~ own nartl lhe- list, he was asked lo liecottn' ;"' 'j visor to General MacArthur and,' subsequently occupy thai posfl (Hearings, p. 560.) Wlutl became of the lisl which fessor Colegrove had provided? " \lie* . i'oin during ""niiin tativee i, nations 10 He ch l0''ial cc "°l likel sccord, H'Hich w ""Preju, work of »f Dec. 11011 and I'^ssed , ,' addr which v "as I beet termin ■mttee i, ^ frc ?°* ha, 'mPressi, "vorabl, l olegrove had provided: " l "lony a not accepted by llie Penlagon. ^"fi 'he fou li-l was accepted and. as Professor V sPnt ^ testified: I was sluee-kcel when I s.iu the' list, '"''',' there were none 'if the recommendation eve- had made. I took thai lisl ovei tee an <>1<1 triend ".'",.■ who had served as Chief of the far & Division in OSS (Office of Strategic Ser*' His name i- Charles Burton Pahs, ee ve'i> , Thee: 'f "'e 1„ '" ? stai "laJ0rity !n8 at p. °v4 ,..• 00 H allt»i of greal integrity, \n<l I remember thai L"Zj \0 , Burton Fahs was astonished ley the c^fT I kn of the names that had heen rrrommen'»e , ovve 1 ' PACTS i r«"? lis. a vc" stanelint: specialist In Japan and e» 'JlL, ■ r ll.nl CI". We checked those names .. M FACTS FORUM NEWS, Febrw
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