Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
File 036
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 036. 1955-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1155.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 036. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1155

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 036, 1955-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1155.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 036
Transcript OVERTIME: "And thus the whirligig of TIME brings in his revenges." Shakespeare. -G '5 o v - i H C J5 OJ H Censure upon Censure This week Utah's Republican Senator Wallace Bennett took up where the Wat- kins committee left off and authored a resolution proposing the censure of Joe McCarthy for behavior in the very recent past. The Bennett resolution said that Joe's reference to the Watkins committee as a Communist "handmaiden" and his description of the Senate censure debate as a "lynch bee" were "contrary to good morals and senatorial ethics and tend to bring the Senate into dishonor and disrepute, to obstruct the constitutional processes of the Senate and to impair its dignity." Bennett's conclusion: "Such conduct is hereby condemned, and the Senator from Wisconsin is therefore censured." Such a resolution, coming from a strongly conservative Senator, was a setback to the hopes of Joe's hard-core Senate followers, whose latest gambit had been to promote talk that McCarthy, if censured, might bolt the G.O.P. to head a third party in 1956. Joe's scramble for martyrdom and his appeal over the Senate to the people were cited as evidence of the walkout possibility. It was fairly obvious that Wallace Bennett was one Republican who held scant fear about Joe's defection. Not to be discouraged by resolutions from Bennett or anybody else were the Ten Million Americans Mobilizing for Justice (Time, Nov. 29), whose efforts on Joe's behalf continued apace. Last week T.M.A.M.J. announced that it would take some ten days for a Manhattan accounting firm to tally the names on anti-censure petitions. Boys of grade-school age waved the Ten Million's petitions on New York sidewalks, and a Catholic parent wrote New York's Cardinal Spellman complaining that a nun in a Tuckahoe parochial school was soliciting signatures from fifth- grade pupils. Counter-petition groups also began to appear, e.g., the League of Twenty Million Americans for the Censure of McCarthy, started in Palmer. Mass. by Mrs. Winifred Swanson. a 30-year-old housewife who had never before belonged to anything but a sewing circle. But the man who headed the Select Senate Committee that recommended censure was not to be swayed by the hue and cry of either the Ten Million or the Twenty Million. Said Utah's Republican Senator Arthur Watkins: Joe's censure should be decided by facts, not by a nationwide counting of noses. SEQUELS Ordeal of Living Early one frosty, sunny morning at Lcwisburg, Pa. last week, a mother led her 13-year-old son into the Federal Penitentiary's Administration Building. She went up to a handsome. 50-year-old man who kissed her and said: "Priscilla." Wrapping his arms around the boy, the man greeted him with a "Hiya, Tony." Then I'riscilla. .Anthony and Alger Hiss walked out the door into the sunlight. After serving three years, eight months and five days in prison for perjury. Alger Hiss was paroled (until next September). Outside the prison a throng of more than 70 newsmen surged around him as he intoned his careful words: "I am very glad to use this chance—the first I have had in nearly four years—to reassert my complete innocence of the charges that were brought against me by Whit taker Chambers ... I have had to wait in silence while, in my absence, a myth has been developed. I hope that the return of the mere man will help to dispel the myth ... I shall renew my efforts to dispel the deception that has been foisted on the American people." He said he hoped to "allay" the "fear and hysteria of these times." Asked if he planned to write a book, he replied: "I certainly intend to do some writing." A box wrapped in Manila paper, said to contain Hiss's notes and papers, was loaded into a red Chevrolet convertible. Then, with his family and two lawyers, Hiss drove off in the red convertible to freedom. In New York City, Hiss will live in a third-floor Greenwich Village walkup apartment that his wife and son have called home. While on parole, he must avoid "evil companions" and report his activities monthly to a parole officer. Confined to New York's Southern District, he may travel upstate almost to Albany, but not to Brooklyn or New Jersey. Being disbarred, he may no longer practice law. The outlook for Hiss was the subject of some reflection by Whittaker Chambers. On his Maryland farm, where he is also doing some writing, Chambers, who is now much thinner than he was before his two major heart attacks in the last two years, observed: "Alger Hiss will be passing from the ordeal of prison to the ordeal of daily living, which may "el prove more trying. Hiss is approachM the most difficult moment of his life- Next day, a reporter relayed this though' to Hiss as he arrived at his Greenvrifl Village home. Asked Hiss tersely: "W| that his hope or a statement?" When another reporter appeared at t^ Chambers farm. Esther Chambers & him down in front of the kitchen firepl^ to wait while Chambers went to his typl writer, put a piece of yellow paper in I and wrote: "The saddest single fact* about the Hiss case is that nobody c3fi change the facts as they are know* Neither Alger Hiss nor I, however muc we might wish to do so, can change the* facts. They are there forever. That is v* inherent tragedy of this case." Death Among Thieves The Federal Penitentiary at LewisbuJ Pa., sometimes called "the country c\w\ is also a rough place, the scene of seV ^ recent beatings and sluggings and j home of several gangland veterans 0' 1952 riot at the Chillicothe, Ohio pris°J Last week one, or two. or three Lewisbj inmates crept into a third-floor, four-m cell and swung a brick in a knotted w||J sock down on the head of a sleeping ma The victim: William Walter RemingWj B.A.. Phi Beta Kappa (Dartmouth I, >•" (Columbia), and convicted perjurer. , After the attack. Remington crawl down a flight of steps, was found by • guard on the second-floor landing. 0*1 and bleeding. In the prison hospital tried to speak, but the words would 1 come. Next day, a surgeon operated to move chips of bone and relieve Pre5"- on the brain from skull fractures. Si** . hours later, Bill Remington died. , Promptly the FBI arrested I thieves, charging them with murder. accused: George Junior McCoy, 34' TONY, Alger & PxisciLLA Hiss From an old acquaintance, a prediction. TIME, DECEMBER 6, 1954 "TIME cannot bend the line." Tho\ Page M FACTS FOUUM NEWS, FebrwvrW
File Name uhlib_1352973_v004_n002_036.jpg