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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 034. 1955-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 8, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1153.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 034. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1153

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 034, 1955-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 8, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1153.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 034
Transcript TIME Changes Everything "3 C 3 O c^-e c 5 o H e?l 3 60 NATIONAL AFFAIRS POLITICAL NOTES Keynotes The calendar had just about run out of states' primaries and nominating conventions * and it was high time for the Big Boys to start thinking in terms of November's congressional elections. The primaries had turned up few clear-cut issues or trends. They seldom did. Last week's surprise in Wisconsin (see below) was added proof that local feelings and local personalities count as much in primaries as major issues and voting records. What the boys in the states needed from now to November were ringing battle cries. Last week the Big Boys supplied them. In Washington Democratic National Chairman Robert Emmet Hannegan sounded his keynote: "Hold the line against reaction." The Democratic issue, as far as Hannegan was concerned, would be to tar the G.O.P. as reactionary and claim all social gains for the Democrats. In Denver and Cheyenne, Republican National Chairman B. Carroll Reece hewed to his official line: "The choice ... is between a Republican Congress and a P.A.C.-Pendergast Congress." He hammered at the Democrats' "unholy alliance" with the "radical-dominated" Political Action Committee which "calls the tune to which the administration dances—a tune strangely like the Internationale." It looked as though foreign policy and the tangled peace would come in for but little discussion. The campaign of 1946 would be largely on domestic issues. Yankee Liberal Six years ago in Vermont, Industrialist Ralph E. Flanders lost a campaign for the Republican senatorial nomination. His friends jokingly tell him that it was because of a widely circulated photograph of himself. It showed him holding a pig in an awkward fashion. Vermont farmers, say Flanders' friends, laughed and voted for Senator George Aiken. Joke or no, Ralph Flanders made no such mistake last week. Result: he carried the farm as well as the city vote (with C.I.O. backing), swept to easy victory over Lawyer Sterry R. Waterman (30,878 to 24.823). This made him almost certain to go to the Senate as the successor to able, scholarly Warren R. Austin, who resigned to become permanent U.S. member of the U.N. Security Council. Bald, bespectacled Ralph Flanders, 65, will be no stranger to Washington. His engineering and machine-tools skill and his Yankee obstinacy have kept him in & jout of the capital for 13 years. As part of a Commerce Department advisory committee in 1934 he calmly and candidly criticized the Roosevelt Administration. In 1941 he resigned his job as OPM boss of machine-tool priorities because his blunt- ness had him at odds with OPM bigwigs. * Only six remained: New York, Nevada, Louisiana, Colorado. Rhode Island and Connecticut. Vermont's Flanders Washington knows him. When the OPM was reorganized, he was quickly recalled. He did advisory and expert jobs for the WPB and the Economic Stabilization Board. Lately he has been influential in the Committee for Economic Development. At home in Springfield, Vt., he is the progressive chairman of the board of the crack Jones & Lamson Machine Co. His labor skirts are clean. The United Electrical local at J. & L. is on record to the effect that he has given it "absolutely fair treatment." The natives know he is a sound, hardheaded Vermonter. Turnabout Among Marine airmen in the Solomons in 1944 a bluff, genial Irishman came closer than most non-flying officers to achieving a legend. They laughed at his incredible yarns, gobbled up his extra rations, deferentially addressed him as Judge. Some almost believed the sign which sagged incongruously over his tent on mucky, jungle-thick Bougainville: "McCarthy for U.S. Senator." Last week in tidy Wisconsin, the same Joseph R. McCarthy, discharged as a captain, unexpectedly made good on his ambition; he won the Republican nomination for U.S. Senator. He also ended a formidable tradition and a dynasty- He beat veteran (21 years) Senator Robert M. La Follette Jr., the last member of his famous family to serve in an important public office. Brash. Joe McCarthy proved his nerve overseas by voluntarily riding the real seat of his squadron's dive "bombers i" action. His political nerve was equally great. The convention which nominated him gave him the vote with misgiving- He was almost an unknown and he wa* up against one of Washington's mo» respected legislators. McCarthy grinned and set out determined to shake every hand in Wisconsin. While overconfident La Follette conr mitteemen relaxed, energetic Joe stump6* the state wearing his old khaki shirts- He shrewdly wooed conservative farm^1* with attacks on Washington bureaucrat skirted the touchy foreign-policy issu(» chided his opponent for a long absent* from home. Backed by the regular G.0-" organization he accused errant Progre^ sives of trying to steal the Republic3* party. But even optimistic Joe McCart" had not counted on victory until late t* turns on election day showed that lab* had deserted La Follette. Milwauk** county, which Young Bob had carried W 55,000 in his 1940 campaign as a Pf gressive, went for McCarthy by io,ooo' the G.O.P. primary. , The turnabout was partly the result, onetime La Follette supporters flock*" into the Democratic primary to vote m former Representative Howard McMu. ray, an ardent New Dealer. They nr. shied away from La FoIIette's isolation1! record, his return to Republicanism a" subsequent indorsement by Ohio's c0 servative Taft. j Blunder. In rural districts Young ** lost more votes by coming out on elect'0 eve against feeble, aged (82), but P°PU!, Governor Walter S. Goodland, who ** Associated Press Wisconsin's McCarthy An ambition met, a dynasty ended. 18 renomination without a: campaign. -., man-Americans, once solid for the £ Follettes, no longer balloted in a WJJ This time many voted a preference * McCarthy's conservative stand on * mestic issues. Defeat for La Follette was a sad &<%> TI«E. TIME, AUGUST 2i "Save your TIME."— Seneca. P*g« 32 FACTS FORUM NEWS, February, I* PACTS
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