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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 022. 1955-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1141.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 022. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1141

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 022, 1955-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1141.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript ■ Act" Controversy on the American scene— Segregation in Public Schools IN 1896 the Supreme Court held that segregation in public schools is not a violation of the Constitution. In 1954 the Supreme Court — under the leadership of Chief Justice Earl Warren — reversed that earlier decision and held that segregation in public schools violates the Fourteenth Amendment, which says that no state shall deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the law.1 Do you think that this recent segregation decision was good for America? Let's answer that question from two opposite points of view, taking first the arguments of some who answer "Yes." The Supreme Court's historic decision in the school segregation cases was unanimous. It was handed down in May, 1954. The opinion was written by Chief Justice Earl Warren. It held that racial segregation of children in public schools is unconstitutional. There, in brief, bare outline, is the story of progressive American democracy's twentieth century victory over the forces of reaction, bigotry, and prejudice.' As time goes by; as its real meaning filters into the thinking of people all over the world; as its intent is implemented by action throughout our nation — the Supreme Court's decision in the school segregation cases will do more good for America than any other court decision or official act since Lincoln's proclamation freeing the slaves.3 While rejoicing over this great stride in the direction of national decency, we are prone to give all the credit to Earl Warren and the eight other Justices on the Supreme Court. They are indeed entitled to all the gratitude the nation can give them. But primary credit for the decision should go to the man primarily responsible for it — Dwight D. Eisenhower. The President, of course, has nothing to do with the Court's deliberations or decisions. But the quiet, determined, dedicated efforts of Eisenhower created the conditions — the national attitude, the national atmosphere — which made Page 20 that school segregation decision possible in May, 1954.1 Unmotivated by fear of pressure groups, with no thought of glory or political gain, Dwight D. Eisenhower has put more personal effort into solving America's race problem than any President since Lincoln. Unlike his predecessor, who tried publicly but unsuccessfully to force civil rights legislation through a hostile Congress, Eisenhower has worked, often secretly, but always effectively, lo eliminate discrimination both within and without the federal government.4 The first effect of his convictions was felt in the nation's capital. Quietly, yet with grim determination, the President has brought about complete desegregation in the District of Columbia. Two days after he took the oath of office as President, the District Court of Appeals knocked down two laws prohibiting discrimination in Washington restaurants. With full presidential backing, the Attorney-General intervened so vigorously that within four months a Supreme Court reversal abolished this discrimination.4 This was just the beginning. Jim Crow- has now been eliminated from Washington's theatres, parks, swimming pools, and other public facilities. Next will be the integration of District jails and merging of white and Negro fire companies. More than a dozen Negroes have been appointed to important government positions. No longer are naval shore washrooms and cafeterias segregated.4 ARMED FORCES DESEGREGATED In the vast majority of veterans' hospitals, North and South, both staffs although Warren was a nice guy 1 deserved some kind of reward for 0 porting Ike politically, Warren did' have the legal training or judicial ( perience to qualify as Chief Ju^ of the Supreme Court. Actually, the absence of too #" legal training and judicial expera enabled Chief Justice Earl Warren pull the Supreme Court together '& unanimous decision which wrote a J" page in the history of human equal" Where previous Chief Justices! found themselves tied down by judi precedents and hedged about by nW legalisms, this "nice guy" — as 1 Warren's detractors condescendi1! called him — was able to rise aboM lifeless letter of the law and intm our Constitution as a living, dynaii"' strument of government which can " pace with the march of civilization guarantee twentieth century In'f and equality for all American cijl in keeping with twentieth century! cepts of what freedom and c'1lli mean.* Earl Warren was not concerned] the propaganda or political implied] of his decision. He rather imps'! dismissed the arguments that segrefl schools are all right if children o'| races are provided equal facilities did not permit himself to be draWJ I he issue of whether segregated $c cost more or less than intej"! schools.8 quired basic j 'ce in joundai is a pr 'he chil him foi in helpi environ ful that Peeted i the opf an opr. underta which i ''qual te "We sented: Public i ra-ce, eve [If NO MUSTY LEGALISMS •I gro round He did not bog down in musty isms about what this or that phr'1?, piov this or that clause of the Consti'" y9r< might have meant a hundred year8 and he did not give up in the fa„ ( 0|b. ancient judicial decisions made' ■? a > dej ic< !l> gr and patients are now completely mixed. past an(j gone generation of Airier!"' J group All U.S. attorneys and all FBI agents are getting special indoctrination in civil rights law enforcement. Within a few- months after his inauguration, Eisenhower ended segregation and discrimination among the millions of Americans in our armed forces.5 No truly moral American citizen can question the validity of Ike's FEPC program. And it was Eisenhower's appointees —Attorney-General Brownell and Chief Justice Earl Warren — who were responsible for the Supreme Court decision ordering an end to racial segregation in the nation's public schools." When Ike first appointed Earl Warren, there was some complaint that, A great humanitarian, Earl " concentrated his attention in the ' gation issue on the effect that sejjj we Ci tion has on America's children "^ ' ''c ed n but , Instead of probing into the u education- lution, Earl Warren probed i"'i equal '"J fell " hearts and minds of people the Constitution was written The Supreme Court said: EMOT Se • Jgrega "Today, education is per important function of state and chifj'"Ke governments. Compulsory school » is hound' ance laws and the great expen" health for education both demonstra' , pi ... recognition of the importance of ■ "orei tion to our democratic society. " p,„ FACTS FORUM NEWS. Februati'
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