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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 019. 1955-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1138.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 019. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1138

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 019, 1955-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1138.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript ele for rich p* t to such insfr ment is do*» n, so oflen •• institutions,' idily rising I 3 making it ' diildren of 1» i the benefits' i adults in ctionally illij ompleted fei ooling. DujJ 1,000 men 4 vice because 'hree hun<q for the r of the Kore* i in sel Is ■' ier educati0" . in most ca* lerable nuiT" il schoollio"5 1, conveniej ■ maintained enn., nig*J^ ington Int**^ otter schoolhouses which are drastically h-?i'0r m a" resPects- Bringing Negro cnildren into schools heretofore reserved °r white children will necessitate trans- 'e"ing some of the white children out sn 61!rfnools to provide the required Pace I his would mean inferior facili- inrf • the transferred white children ' id, m many cases, resentment and bitterness.' is not the American way to raise |"e group by pulling another group fo/'V'.'- , traflitions call for attractive ^aulittes for all. It is the duty of Con- Fund' ,re fore' t0 appropriate adequate .. s for unsegregated classrooms, 'ch will mean an improvement for all tne children and a harm to none.7 In 1930 we spent 3.0 per cent of our "at'onal income for schools: in 1951, e spent only 2.5 per cent of our national income on schools. EDUCATION SECURES FREEDOM America is built upon the faith of the ,|encan People in education. Among m„ e. y Enelisl' colonist* the first com- "'"I? undertaking in each settlement lieved fi i "ial scho°'- The colonists be- of A .?- as succeeding generations ,, . *mer,cans have beHeved af|cr |h|.|n sonlht political freedom which the) Ihrn ,cou,d be made secure only rough widespread popular education. ' °mas Jefferson said, "If a nation ex- exne i l 'gnorant and free . . . il DeSr8cts what never was and never will This basic idea that only the educated g0" Ca" be tru|y free> and that self- edue ?Tnt is P°ssib'e only with an Ame • c,ltize,"7> pervades all early the rfTi" h,story and underlies all of ('„„,ae"berations of the Constitutional reco?" T The fou»ders of this nation the gni2e" a vali(l national interest in educPtr0m0tion and encouragement of mav 10n~a national interest which in\L '"?es transcend the more limited n,erest of the individual states.8 dear \rT "l™6 &ae' they made !t efuall>' leave ■ e nati°nal government would eomm ■ y t0 the states and the local lion I"-"'"65 the c°n>ml of their educa- "°nal institutions.8 state" j i two foundation stones- assist ' contro1' with federal tjon ,ance and support where the na- an ed mte.test requires—we have built in ., aucational system which is unique theevt ' Sense of the word' Avoiding forei m° centralization found in many othergi! coun,ries — yet avoiding, on the federal " i- 'he eviIs of a "do-nothing" 'atin ,pollcy concerning national edu- coon .prob|ems—we have evolved a shin -rat,ye local-state-federal partner- BWP m education." ableeaCtiL°1na,ries in Co"gress have been 10 block constructive federal legis lation which would have fulfilled the promise of this partnership. It is inconceivable that they should have succeeded thus far; it will be disastrous to our educational future if they continue to succeed. A free people whose heritage and hope of freedom are in the equal opportunities of their children must not be deterred by the misplaced cries of "states' rights'' —must not be frightened by the false cries of communism raised against ever) movement to deepen lhe meaning of America for all Americans and to extend freedom and opportunity to the people in all areas—rural or urban: prosperous or poor. Helping lei guarantee equal and ade- control of the children for educational purposes . . . [the State] deprives the father of the sacred rights of parentage. . .. "Whence does the State derive the right to take charge of my children and say when, where, what, and by whom they shall be taught? Whence does . . . [the State] derive the right to take another man's money and devote it to the education of my child? . . . "If the State may upon the plea of 'necessary to the general welfare' take under its control the education of the people, it mav, upon the same plea . . . take charge of their religion, for if edu- cation be necessary to the maintenance „. . ... —Wid. World Photo Kindergarten room with fence-enclosed play-yard at streamlined school in Beilflower, Calif. quate educational opportunities for all the nation's children is a federal responsibility. We must insist that our federal government assume it. That was one side of the question. Here, now, is the opposite side — arguments of some who DO NOT approve of federal aid to education. ON September 29, 1875, a Mr. San- som, whom history has forgotten, addressed the Texas Constitutional Convention, expressing opposition to a proposal that Texas set up a public school system. He said: "Mr. President. . . . "How dare a government professing to be free ruthlessly invade the sacred domain of private duty and private right? What right has .. .[government ] to lay violent hands upon . . . American citizens who have not attained their majority to force them to attend particular schools, study particular books under a particular teacher? ... By assuming February FACTS FORUM NEWS, February, 1955 of good government.. . religion is more so. .. . "Friends of public education [say] thai if we do not provide a good system of public schools, emigrants will not come .. .[to Texas] to settle and develop the wealth of this great State. Very well, sir, let them stay where they are, or go somewhere else. For one, I do not want men to come ... [to Texas] who are moved to do so by the desire to have the hard-earned dollars of other men applied to the support of their families. And I should think, sir. that men who are too lazy to educate their own children, and mean enough to want other men to be forced to do it for them, would be a long time in developing the wealth or greatness of any state."9 Mr. Sansom, of course, lost his battle. Texas has a public school system. But notice Mr. Sansom was talking in 1875. At that time, Texas was economically the poorest state in the Union— the very poorest. Yet nowhere in these debates is there one word about asking the federal government for help. Today, when Texas is among the most Page 17 IV
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