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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 011. 1955-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1130.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 011. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1130

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 011, 1955-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1130.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript pPpe* n ndon com- s the and I Po- best- eory, Mistakes in Socialist Theory Dr. Ludwig von Mises is the internationally famous Austrian economist, professor successively at Vienna and Geneva, and author of many authoritative hooks, including theory of money (1912). He now lives in the United States and is consultant lo the National Association of Manufacturers. No one has argued more cogently thai communism anil socialism are Mistaken. In bureaucracy (1944) he said: "Our age has witnessed a triumphal advance of the Socialist cause. . . . America alone is still free to choose. And the decision of the American people will determine the outcome for the whole of mankind." with the col*] From SOCIALISM* :ans of excha1 % LUDWIG VOX MISES o.,„,.,ii.. oiive :ans _. _. enerally. g»l n, to industry- :nown, and IN y element 'n y, a rapid <if' f industry, 4 iction was n" Is, now no W nir wants o' I nufacturing he guild-m^ de by the 4 division °' NO CLASS CONFLICT '.' • • Hie theorists of socialism and "reconcilable class conflict talk as °ugn there was some kind of abstract or which everyone was qualified to nr,?"" a"o' as though skilled labor "y.c?' "to the question. In reality unskll I i3 'S0lute" lahor exists. Nor is "er i' n- or homogeneous. A scavenger is difierent from a porter. Moreover '' ** of unskilled labor is much han or'tbo0! S'de,red 'T^ """^ally, workshop rkets kept rerent corpof th • -- -■«. purely numerical face of diV The ' P d,°X C'aSfS theory assumes- ■ ■ tors If t "sol a dass are competi- ishes i"' '"""'"''' of workers dimin- of 1.1 a" lf lhe margiiial productivity ill|(|";'"j grows accordingly, wages rise, „, ,.;"'' ""'"i lhe income and standard ,."'-" "I the worker. Trade unions . " :""'- 'tis. When they, who were J'' -° to be called into being to fight shin '.'"'I"''"''"'.-, close their member- ulerii migi-l'l) ,• ' . Ke "'" Ids, they implicitly recoe- production ol' '"■< the fact. ' g their labor] ^Petition operates among the posi^^n they compete for higher rank « and for promotion lo higher afford mbers of other classes can preci8et0 "''"ai" indifferent as to the persons who are numbered :ver rising-j sufficed. 1" itinued on Pa* ===== the class of <f. cleans of soc'0 neans of w..n~ - idem wage P S of wage-lab0';. ■■■!>'■ *■'«-■ among the relative minority which rises from the lower to the higher strata, so long as these are the most capable. Hut for the workers themselves this is an important matter. Each is in competition with the others. Of course each is interested to see that every other foreman's job shall be occupied by the most suitable man and the best. But each is anxious that that one job which comes within his reach shall fall to him, even though he is not the most suitable man for the job; and the advantage to him outweighs the fraction of the general disadvantages which may eventually also come his way. SOLIDARITY OF INTERESTS The theory of the solidarity of the interests of all members of society is the only theory which shows how society is possible; and if it is dropped, the social unity dissolves not only into classes, but into individuals confronting each other as opponents. Conflict between individual interests is overcome in society but not in the class. Society knows no components other than individuals. The class united by a community of special interests does not exist; it is the invention of a theory incompletely articulated. The more complicated society is, and the further differentiation has progressed within it. so much the more numerous are the groups of persons similarly placed within the social organism; though necessarily, lhe number of members in each group diminishes as the number of groups increases. The fact that the members of each group have certain immediate interest in common does not, of itself, create universal equality of interests between them. The equality of position makes them competitors, not people with common aspirations. Nor can any absolute community of interests arise from the incomplete similarity between lhe positions of allied groups. As far as their positions are similar, competition will operate between them. The interests of all cotton mill owners may run parallel in certain directions, but insofar as this is the case, the more are they competitors among themselves. In other respects only those owners of mills who produce the same count of yarn will be in exactly parallel positions. Here again to this extent they are in competition with each other. In other respects, however, the common interests are similar over a much wider field; they may comprise all workers in the cotton industry, then, again, all cotton producers, including planters and workers, or further, all industrialists of anv kind, etc.: the grouping varies perpetually according to the aim and interests to be pursued. But complete similarilv "*£" 'he '""""" !" 'he U"ited S""" °Wn " """" "r'" *' 'e't' "aH,e ''" De"'0"■ MiChi9an- Ri9'"' 5"eef "ene '■""« YrtClC ""■•■rsity Press. 1951. Pages 338-342, 350-351, and 525-532. Reprinted by permission jels FebruarH' CTs FORUM NEWS, February, 1955 ■ Page 9
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