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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 010. 1955-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1129.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 010. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1129

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 010, 1955-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1129.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript Epoehal Attaek on Capitalism Engels has said that at a "Congress" of the "Communist League" held in London in November, 1847, he and Marx "were commissioned to prepare for publication a complete theoretical and practical" program for the Communist party. The result was the communist manifesto, written first in German, quickly translated into French and published in Paris in June, 1848, and by 1850 translated into English, Danish, and Polish. The first Russian translation was published in 1863. The manifesto is the best- known Communist writing. It is still an essentially accurate account of Communist theory, and therefore a very poor guide lo Communist practice. MANIFESTO OF THE COMMUNIST PARTY By KARL MARX and FRIEDRICH EXGELS ./\. SPECTRE is haunting Europe the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre; Pope and Czar, Metternich and Guizot, French radicals and German police- spies. Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where the opposition that has not hurled back tbe branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries? Two things result from this fact. I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power. II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery —Wide World Photo Karl Mare tale of the spectre of communism with a manifesto of the party itself. To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish, and Danish languages. I Bourgeois and Proletarians* The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles. Freeman and slave, patrician and plebian, lord and serf, guild-master and journeyman—in a word, oppressor and oppressed—stood in constant opposition to one another, carried on an uninterrupted, now hidden, now open light, a fight that each time ended either in a revolutionary reconstitution of society at large or in the common ruin of the contending classes. In the early epochs of history, we find almost everywhere a complicated arrangement of society into various orders, a manifold graduation of social rank. In ancient Rome we have patricians, knights, plebians, slaves; in the Middle Ages, feudal lords, vassals, guild- masters, journeymen, apprentices, serfs; in almost all of these classes, again, subordinate gradations. The modern bourgeois society thai has sprouted from the ruins of feudal society, has not done away with class antagonisms. It has but established new classes, new conditions of oppression, new forms of struggle in place of the old ones. Our epoch, the epoch of the bourgeoisie, possesses, however, this distinctive feature; it has simplified the class antagonisms. Society as a whole is more and more splitting up into two great hostile camps, into two great classes directly facing each other: bourgeoisie and proletariat. From the serfs of the Middle Ages sprang the chartered burghers of the earliest towns. From these burgesses the first elements of the bourgeoisie were developed. The discovery of America, the rounding of the Cape, opened up fresh ground for the rising bourgeoisie. The East Indian and Chinese markets, the coloniza tion of America, trade with the col"* the increase in the means of excutf and in commodities, generally, ga<* commerce, to navigation, to industry impulse never before known, and a1* by, to the revolutionary element in tottering feudal society, a rapid "* opment. The feudal system of industry, u* which industrial production was rflfl polized by closed guilds, now no 1"" sufficed for the growing wants o' new markets. The manufacturing ! tern took its place. The guild-m8* were pushed on one side by the ra* facturing middle class; division "' bor between the different corp^! guilds vanished in the face of di*" of labor in each single workshop. Meantime, the markets kept ■ growing, the demand ever rising- J manufacture no longer sufficed. 1™ (Continued on Pw *By bourgeoisie is meant the class of {* capitalists, owners of the means of so&f duction mid employers of wiige-lid'0', proletariat, lhe class of modern wage-aA who, having no means of production ol mill, mi- reduced I" selling their IllliOl'i in order to live. Fro By L of ir Hioug labor perfo liardb no su unskil ger is the r, small, than c The lors. j ishes, "f lain and w of Ini cannot suppoj 'he en ship |i "ize th. Com worker positio ranks. afford ecise Page 8 Friedrich Engels FACTS FORUM NEWS, Februaii' •'ACTS
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