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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 004. 1955-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1123.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 004. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1123

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955 - File 004, 1955-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1189/show/1123.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript promise of vast atomic liounty lo the underprivileged regions which have been most susceptible to Communist propaganda. Like the bold Marshall Plan, which was conceived and carried out under the Truman administration, the Eisenhower atoms-for-peace plan can work with or without the cooperation of the Soviet Union. Like the Marshall Plan before it. the atoms-for-peace plan was offered to the world with a direct and sincere invitation to the Soviets to participate. If ihe Soviet Union should finally refuse lo participate and turn over fissionable material to the international pool, the I nited States will go ahead as it has alreadv started, and undertake to do the job alone, through United Nations channels. If the Soviets should decide to cooperate, then learning to work with them in this touchy field will further the cause of world peace.1 The- >ee\icts do not have as much fissionable material as we do. Therefore. any contribution that they may make to this proposed 1 N stockpile would affect their bomb manufacture more than our contribution would affect ours. America ran make substantial contributions of atomic material to an international pool without hurting our own striking power. PLAN IS FOOLPROOF Hence, this Eisenhower plan is foolproof. If the Russians do contribute large quantities of fissionable materials, they largely reduce their ability to produce the articles of war. If they give little or nothing, they convict themselves in the court of world opinion. When the atom pool plan was first suggested, the Soviets rejected it. The other nations of the world which generously and unanimously accepted the proposal did, nonetheless, express grave doubts that the proposal would ever serve its basic purpose of easing international tensions unless the Soviet Union did participate.2 The Soviets apparently rejected the plan primarily because they wanted to use the United Nations forum as a propaganda platform for touting their scheme for international atomic disarmament without international inspection to insure compliance. John Foster Dulles, however, stole this propaganda possibility from the Soviets by saying that he did not think the controversial arena of the United Nations General Assembly was a proper place for discussions between the Soviets and us over their participation in the atom pool plan. Mr. Dulles made it quite clear that such a delicate matter as this should be discussed in secret negotiations. By the latter part of 1954, it became apparent that the negotiations had con- Page 2 —Wide World !• Vishinsky and associates alternately gay and serious about atoms. Soviet UN del*, with British Delegate Anthony Nutting, center, and U.S. Delegates C. D. Jackson He' top photo) and H. C. Lodge (left in lower photo). siderably softened the attitude of the Soviet Union. The Soviets were no longer saying flatly that they would not participate, but were indicating that they might come in if we would permit other nations — which to the Soviet Union meant Red China — to participate; and if we would put the new atomic pool agency under the UN Security Council, where the Soviets have a veto. We stood firm against both of these Soviet proposals, however; and, on December 4. 1954, the Soviets made one of the most startling concessions to the 1 nilccl States that they have ever made in the United Nations. They joined us and all other members of the UN General Assembly in a unanimous endorsement of a resolution approving President Eisenhower's atoms-for-peace plan.3 Almost simultaneously with this official UN action, the United States gave reality and impetus to the International Atom Pool plan by making a gift offer of 220 pounds of processed uranium.4 \env. 220 pounds of processed uranium is no insignificanl amount.' It costs only about two million dollars to produce-, but if used as atomic fuel it could in theory produce in an efficiently? atomic generator about 21/2 billion* watt hours of electrical power, °l much as is produced by all of the ' nessee Valley Authority's hydroeH generators in a month. In physical dimensions, 220 \>°" of processed uranium is only aboU'i size of a regulation soccer ball. Bu' use in isotope research, it is em to supply dozens of laboratories tin'1' out the world. Although this American gift is *. technically to the International A1? Energy Pool, it is carefullv hedged I »iih safeguards to prevent its n"~ When shipments of the materia' actually made, they will be sent i" c small quantities, protected by J metal containers, and undci armed United States guards. Then be consigned, not into the hands ° international agency, but directly' receiving countries.4 Before the shipments arc •" made, however, the international *l must be set up to administer the J wide research program for wliic" American contribution is made. The Eisenhower atoms-for-pca<'e' calls not onlv for the international > FACTS FORUM NEWS, February,
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