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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 059
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 059. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1108.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 059. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1108

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 059, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1108.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 059
Transcript '* local school operation. Just as ffearly, the delegates agreed that fed- ^1 aid should not be substituted for *Cal and state support nor should it * any way reduce the local controls Jttt'eh have always marked the opera- ">» of the public school system. It *as generally agreed that America as the resources to provide more Jaiools and teachers and to raise the 'andard of education, but it was liu- ler agreed that we need the will and llJe machinery for accomplishing the °bK'ctives. , "ie majority of the participants J^eed that state aid should be incased to provide a basic program on P* equalized basis with a fair share Fj-Jng provided by the local commu- .">'• They recommended that consti- ftlonal and statutory restrictions on fading and taxing powers of the *al and state governments should be 'l'''! to the extent necessary to pro- lj '' an adequate program of educa- J"1 The fact that neither the state Jf.the local community uses enough ,, 'ts wealth for schools was unani- °"sl\ recognized. X -u % now can we obtain a continuing interest in education?" Vk Was generally agreed that the Ij '""Is must do what tlie public wants 1^'"' to do but that the public must interested if we are to develop and tijj"'t;"n superior schools. To secure 'ii/'i" interest and support, it is essen- »],,! '•" tne acnievements, tne needs, bj, ">e plans for the public schools F^ade available to citizens through tv r-v medium of communication and 'IV M,,i,C(' of information. It was Hr(,'V'"'z<'d that teachers and pupils ■ "i" most effective means for seen Be schools, and that the providing %t Un<' holding public interest in Bg schools, and that the providing t Sh-quality educational opportuni- *i(i''"d acquainting the citizenship \. u> quality of the program was tort e^ec?tive in securing their sup- ■jri, are some recommendations distr.' are applicable to every local I| Jj ake wider and more consistent llt^J press, radio, and television, to 2 atize the work of the school. hi,-, se lay advisory committees ap- K]t\ "V the board to study currenl *tl(| ."'"s and to recommend solutions , \ Improvements. V '•He open school board meet- ','1 '-" Ntio'f'1 tno Public invited to attend. '•!,] S^ S> '"'arly should representatives i\jM'"'niiiuiiit\ groups be asked to let nc This "|, f si prft & ■i!j(i '""iMimuv groups °ard meetings and budget meet- Selp0"''1"-'' bigh school students J(!mjc! teaching as a career, through Dg up of courses and units of Ef^on on the work of the public 5. Make regular reports to the public on the school program; include in such reports budgets, proposed building plans, proposed changes in curriculum, etc. 6. Secure publicity concerning the accomplishments of students in academic areas in a manner comparable to that publicity secured for outstanding athletes. 7. Open the school to the public. Let them know that they are welcome to visit their schools at any time. Have open houses and other programs which emphasize citizen visits to schools. Methods Criticized Following: is ill,- comment of Joseph Kornfeder, formerly a member of the Anglo-American Secretarial of tin- Communist International in Moscow, the group which .supervised ( inn inn ni-l activi' lies in holh England and America. A graduate of the I.enin School of Political Warfare, he is highly educated in the techniques of (ioniinunist operations, litis now devoting his time and efforts to the assistance of investigative bodies and groups of private citizens in exposing the Communist conspiracy. To the best of my knowledge this is the first time in this country that a big national conference disregarded the customary method of procedure, and adopted methods which arc tailored to domination by an inner clique. The surprise in this case was the methods, with the aid of which 11 lose who arranged the whole thing wanted to put over their program. Their method of organizing the so- called "round table" discussion groups and the creation of "levels" through which the discussions were to be filtered, proceeding from one echelon to another, remind me of the pattern of "legislative" organization devised by the strategists of communism for the purpose of manipulating the will of the electorate of Soviet Russia. My reference is to the so-called "Soviet Democracy." Under that system everyone can vote but no one can elect whom he wants; he has to vote for the ones the Communist party selects. Now I do not say that the ones who arranged this White House Conference are Communists. But they must have been enamored of some of the methods by which Communists derail popular will. The usual democratic conference which you and 1 know. convenes and, after the opening preliminaries, chooses committees with the general consent of the assemblage. These committees then work over the problems and report back to the assembly for approval or rejection. In either case the results of the discussion arc in the form of rccommenda- fORUM News, April, 1956 tions or resolutions submitted to the general assembly. In the White House Conference, however, everything was done just the opposite. The general assembly simply just didn't have a chance at all. It was immediately scattered into 160 "round table" groups. The 160 little groups discussed predetermined subjects and elected one of their group to still another higher echelon and, by the time they reached the top echelon, there were only two members; and those who were in opposition to federal aid. or suspected of opposition, had been eliminated. In Soviet Russia the workers of a factory, let us say, elect their delegates. These meet and elect delegates to tlie local Soviet. The local Soviet meets and elects delegates to the All Union Congress of Soviets. The All Union Congress meet and elect a slate chosen for them known as the Presidium. The Presidium receives its instructions from the Politburo ol the Communist party. The Politburo is instructed by the current "Stalin" of the parry. Long before the Congress meet, everything that they are to decide already has been decided for them. That is how "Soviet Democracy" works under communism. The purpose of dividing or staggering the will of the electorate is to give the inner clique, which in that case is the Communist party, an extra chance at every level, of putting through their will — also of weeding out those who are in opposition, or are suspect of opposition. The method used at this White House Conference, while not an exact duplicate, reminds me very much of the type inherent in Soviet method. Certainly it lends itself to extreme manipulation by those who initiated it; and the suspicion is warranted that those who arranged it feared the will of the assembled delegates, and found methods of negating that will by the Sovact type of procedure. In short, the clique that organized and initiated this conference found the "fictitious democracy" method as much to their convenience as do the leaders of Soviet Russia. Generally, may I say, as a concluding observation, that the Communist pattern of organizing and dominating the masses is a more visible pattern, once understood, than the methods of agitation; because their methods of organizational penetration are definite and concrete, whereas their agitation is very often deceptive and subtle. The pattern of operating the White House Conference on Education in Washington showed the influence of the Communist method of mass domination on those who arranged the conference. END Page 57 V f
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