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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 056
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 056. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1105.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 056. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1105

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 056, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1105.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 056
Transcript ■■■■■■ Sen. Glen H. Taylor, Idaho, vice presidential candidate on the Progressive Party ticket, 1948. Portrait of Henry A. Wallace, presidential candidate on the same ticket appears in the background. WIDE WORLD PHOTO ^J^- jAg, *■ 1 * 4-Jr^ m\* | ■fcjk 1 ^fgStf I ti • i 1 support Henry Wallace and Glen Taylor was made. That was because they were two men who were willing to work with the Communist Party in this coalition party * * ° And, too, when we had on two or three occasions meetings in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, at which Henry Wallace and Glen Taylor spoke, the fund-raising activities and the ticket- sales activities in connection with these meetings were directed right out of the headquarters of the Communist Party ° ° ° On the same day, John Lautner, a former member of the review commission of the CPUSA, testified regarding the Party's efforts to "break out from its isolation" by forming the Progressive Party, and he declared: It enabled the Communist Party to reach into ranks, into sections, of the American population into which they could never have reached before, and it opened up all kinds of new possibilities for the Communist Party throughout the country and enabled the Party to carry on a Communist ideological campaign in the labor movement, in the trade-union movement * * * In addition to that, because it was not necessary for the Communist Party to put forth its own national candidates, Wallace and Taylor served that very same purpose for the Communist Party. In the light of the above, it is interesting to note the distribution of the popular vote for Wallace in 1948, totaling 1.137,957. Popular vote, 1948, for prcrident Source: Compiled by the United Tress trnm official and unofficial returns (as of December 1, 1948 )J States 1,522 Arkansas 751 190,381 6,115 11,683 1,636 4,972 9,649 4,603 1,567 Maryland Massachusetts 9,983 38,157 38,955 \ i ■ 27,866 Mississippi 225 3,998 6,641 Wallace, Progressive States \e\ ada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York \orth Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Hhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Wallace, Progress^ e 1,40(1 1,970 42,683 1,037 501,167 3,915 8.220 37,596 I (.661 55,161 2,587 154 2,80] 1,861 J.764 2,679 1,279 1,86) 29,745 3,311 25,282 931 'Taken from the World Almanac, 1949, p. 91. Page 5 i Presidential election returns hij states for Communist Party candidates The W Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky I nnisl.m.i Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Net ada New Hampshire New Jersey New \le\ieo New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma (rregon Pennsylvania Hhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Irs.is Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Total votes cast 184 117 216 675 730 3,704 64 328 320 293 636 2.464 2.881 4.853 173 1.257 158 10,884 936 2,386 I.II') I 4,726 283 232 111 209 47 173 1,541 401 1,528 44.748 406 406 175 1.023 133 23 491 15.582 2,187 559 272 162 1.(111 4,821 9.318 6.101 568 1,775 264 2,915 135 27,956 830 7,231 1,681 5,6S8 546 361 231 2(17 947 195 86 2.972 444 3,112 180 679 164 10,877 497 1.1 111 52 1,090 506 204 257 915 2,930 3,384 2,574 417 385 193 1,590 43 35,609 11 360 5,251 101 4,080 411 319 253 2811 405 98 1.907 2,197 91 Whv „'"-*■ .loll, r eonfe, Pdnnaii P*« Co P^Jdeni < h»H. "*( "E ah, ed &eii the Source: World Almanac, 1950, from official returns by states. (To be continued next '" EDUCATION OR INDOCTRINATION (Continued from Page 49) X asadisna has conic into focus through wide publico! the proving ground for the new plan. Although fj believed that Mr. Goslin alone was responsible f°r f conflict in Pasadena, his firing did not terminate the J troversy. Forces arc still at work locally and nationaW 29,tm the Pasadena schools. As predicted by the ConM"? D promote and advance Mr. Goslin's modern educao^j organ, the Daily People's World, Goslin's supporters ^j "continued and intensified their fight against retrogrt'' changes in the school system." i|f Willard Goslin's modern education is not confi'1'',^ Pasadena. Like a huge octopus, its tentacles are strc" I throughout America. Once this octopus gets a str*i 1 hold on the education of a community it is virtually il J sible to eliminate, as the people of Pasadena have H'1,r j ft I960* pillion N exp, Ned SI ft*ide n, ,, H'cause \i. ,"esi( Blowing of had a IJhousani Hi, r*t Wi It is now obvious to interested, interests — socialistic, coram - arc attempting to use the informed citi/.^J O'ttee. nunistic, or cv-t'At V,„ s cc ,c public scho^ f ^ nee p], politic radical ulterior motives. Control of the schools appears t" ' ultimate objective. Indoctrination of the children of - jp ica in a new theory of democracy and freedom ! immediate goal. Will (hey succeed.-' Not if America wakes up in time! u In the next tleeade America will probably ,llJ choice between education and indoctrination. ,J Let us solemnly hope that education will be the v ^ Fa( is Fobum \'i WS, A/"'"' fcPjop. %, 1,(' co C. genera E**ts, ea >mii Everts ^ of t] mate ■''>il ^erence Cl 1,40, 17s. oth, "atiom 6.
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