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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 055. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1104.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 055. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1104

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 055, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1104.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 055
Transcript y expose* ally there pport the ons. Thi nature of actions 3s list mem ind tlep* ed by the ts no pf" ;.qucnt W 3ak is sin; be foul* at a late* ireak W* only m iminuiiis'' tuiizatio1* lose. Thef organ"*' anti-Col tpes. SiK* n outra mists *< litting * ;entofJ ,.- am Alpi «" Worker id Cora" indivW" e move/ iey v/or* low tl>" Workeii Party" ie C ' ,t! l-'ii* secOO* mt tlK'"' ty and 1 lerat""" Cale*J ory "" y JntoftJ itior.s-1 ;nizedj xpefl« beeD J- lation5'! of *j oin"'11 2. The importance of the post or posts he occupied in these organizations. (The Communists commonly limit such posts to individuals who are either Party members Or who possess the Party's confidence, though sometimes big names" are pushed up front as protective coloration.) 3. The extent of his activity. 4. The importance of such organizations in the Communist setup. 5. His adherence to these organizations despite public exposure of their Communist character. 6. His standing in the Communist press, which oper- ates under strictest Moscow and Part) censorship. 7. His standing in Communist organizations. 8. His public statements and writings regarding the Soviet Union, the Communist Party, individual Commu- ptts and Communist-initiated campaigns and organizations. 9. His persona] associations with Communists or sympathizers. Extent of Communist Pahty Membership .1 '""' latest estimate ol Communist Party membership by I federal Bureau of Investigation is about 22,603. The K*t recent breakdown by states is based upon a niciiiliei- ^P of 31,608 in 1951, as drawn up by the FBI. ('oiitiiiunist Party membership l>y states 1951 ^il'.ni,., 96 *r'Z()na 1.36 ^Aansas 20 '"''h'lin., 4,295 ^taado ""'icctieiit E^'aware JJorida Idaho '"inois '"''.HI!, '"«■,, Kansas Ki Lou 72 580 22 135 51 60 1,596 475 25 12 71 50 25 250 c'"h.ekv 'Wsiana it'"'"' ^yl.,,,,1 ffWachusetts 759 "''"«.m INesota '. ,s*n.ri S"a,,, ;Vl'r..sk„ 15(1 7(11 1 362 82 25 15 x"v'"'" P» Hampshire 52 '"s|„ New Jersey New Mexico 1,070 22 . 15,458 North Carolina North Dakota Ohio... 95 52 1,290 Oklahoma 83 125 Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina 1.111 5-1 15 38 Tennessee 21 196 Utah 67 25 53 Washington Wesl Virginia. Wisconsin Wyoming Puerto Rico Washington, D. C. 350 96 420 2 96 60 36 Total 31,608 L. show the growth of the Party, it is inte review ol the total Party membership ,,. - ''Hi's hi ,r,\,„„ U., V.,.-] Il.„....1— :r„ « teresting to add oxer tt period Ni] i 'ls &ven by Earl browder, its general secretary 'HI(K l945, in his pamphlet W, i the pseudonym Americ... N I i -v '" °Pen Party nieinbc j ('/' show that the Part) membership 1 ""'s from the depression year of 1932 '"III here Do We Go From Here? pseudonym Americus. His references are un- ■■•> in open Party members. Mr. Browder's figures show that the Partv membership had increased over to 1945. H, Changes In the relume ,,/ membership ef CPUSA H e&nning of "'>'''■" ol 1930 1931 1932 1934 Tulut nemberthip 7,500 8,339 12,936 16,811 24,500 Total mbership At beginning ol the year of — Con. 1935 30,000 1936 40,000 1938 75,000 1944.... '66,000 1945 80,000 . nK 13.000 in the Arim-il I ,„,,.. kls '""'-i m News, April, 1956 Election returns for 1928, 1932, 1936, and 1940 show how many voters actually supported the Communist Party presidential candidates, except in the states where the Part) was not admitted on the ballot. In 1932 this figure was approximately seven times the Party membership figures as given by Browder. In 1940, during the highly unpopular Stalin-Hitler pact, it closely approximated the Party membership figure, on a one-vote-per-Party-member basis. The Progressive Party backing Henry A. Wallace was publicly supported by the Communist Party. In this connection the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee received, on October 7, 1954, the testimony of Matthew Cvetic, a former FBI informant who had worked his way Matthew Cvetic (left) of Pittsburgh, FBI undercover agent within the Communist Party for seven years, in 1950 shows records to Rep. Francis E. Walter (D., Pa.), Acting Chairman of the House Un-American Activities Committee. wim WORLD PHOTO into the Communist Party of western Pennsylvania, becoming a member of its organizational, educational, and finance committees as well as its nationality, political, and trade-union commissions. We quote him in part: Now, we were din (ted. in a directive which was road to US in the Communist Party headquarters, based on the Communist International of 1935, where all Communist Parties in the world wire ordered to set up in the various countries — and this included the American Communist Party — a coalition party nl Communists and Progressives ° * ° The primary steps which were taken during the years after 1945 to consummate this objective — and this was as early as the last part of 1945, in a report which was given by William Z. Foster, the then national chairman of the Communis! Party in which he stressed that one ol the big objectives of the Communist Party is the setting up of a coalition party in the United States ° * • And as a result of this report of William Z. Foster, subsequently an organization known as the Progressive Party oi the United States was organized On a national basis. I was a member of the organizational committee of the Communist Party, and as a member of this committee I was one ol the eight ranking members of the Communist Part) for the western Pennsylvania district. The Progressive Party, which later you will recall, in the L948 campaign, had presidential candidates, was set up by the organizational committee and also the political commission of the Communist Party. I myself sat in do/ens of meetings where we set up the Progressive Party * * ° The personnel that moved around within the framework of the Progressive Party in key positions were assigned out of the Communist Party office ° ° ° In other words, it was controlled by planted, key Communist agents, who had absolute control of the Progressive Party • * • I attended meetings iii Communist Party headquarters where we discussed candidates who would be put op for ofliee in the Progressive Party. And the final determining factor of who the candidates would be was decided right in the headquarters of the Communist Party ° * * I recall very vividly sitting in several meetings in Communist Party headquarters " ° ° and 1 recall why the decision to V is ine i Page 53
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