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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 054. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1103.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 054. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1103

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 054, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1103.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 054
Transcript ■■ responsible to it, such as the Soviet Military Intelligence. the Soviet Foreign Office, or the Supreme Economic Council. In each case his responsibilities to the Soviet agency- have complete priority over any consideration of the domestic Communist Party. 5. Nonparty Communists. — Certain sympathetic persons find it inadvisable or inexpedient to join the Communist Party. For example, a person of great wealth or prominence may be in full sympathy with the Party, but he maybe unwilling or unable to attend meetings or carry out all Communist duties. But he agrees to abide by the Party's wishes and submit to its discipline. He may be a businessman who depends upon the Soviet government for commercial favors. He may be a politician or a union official who could not be elected to office without the votes eon- trolled by the Communist bloc. In some cases compulsion may be employed to whip the individual into line. 6. Communist Party Supporters. —There are other individuals to be distinguished from the above group who are in no sense under Communist discipline, but who voluntarily and knowingly support the Communists in one or more ways such as voting for Communist candidates, signing of Communist election petitions, donating money for the Party or its press, supporting campaigns in behalf of the Party of individual known Communists, supporting organizations openly sponsored by the Communist Party, defense of Communist legal cases, doing organizational and political favors for the Party, or writing for the Communist press. In each case the subject is fully aware that he is supporting the Communist Party or one or more of its members or one or more of its directly espoused activities. The usefulness of such non-Communists is demonstrated by the example of Raymond Boyer, a wealthy and noted Canadian chemist, who described himself as having "worked in organizations in which there were Communists and in which I knew there were Communists, and I have worked very closely with Communists, but I have never held a Partv card nor paid dues." A memorandum found in the Soviet Embassy cites his services as follows: Gives full information on explosives and chemical plants. • * " (Gave the formula of RDX ° * •). RDX is an explosive perfected in England in 1942. fie also furnished information regarding the pilot plant at Grand Mere, Quebec, for the production of uranium. Fi.li.ow Travelers 1. Fellow travelers. — As differentiated from the above categories, a fellow traveler may be defined as an individual who from time to time supports one or more organizations or campaigns operating under the indirect and usually unpublicized initiative and control of the Communist Party or its representatives. Here we must point out three distinct types. (a) Conscious fellow travelers. —A conscious fellow traveler is one who affiliates with or supports one or more of these groups with full knowledge of its character. For the most part, such persons are motivated by a definite sympathy for the Soviet Union or the Communist Partv or both. Here again we must differentiate between two groups under this heading: (i) Consistent fellow travelers. — Among those who support or affiliate with such organizations or campaigns are those who on no occasion take issue with the Communist Party or its auxiliary organizations. They have a consistent record of such affiliations or sympathy throughout all changes of the Party line, and despite the Page 52 fact that such organizations have been publicly exposed as communistic. (ii) Unreliable fellow travelers. — Occasionally thei* is defection among the fellow travelers who support the Communist Party or its auxiliary organizations. Th" may be due to disillusionment as to the real nature <» the Soviet regime or antagonism toward such actions a> the Stalin-Hitler Pact or disgust with Communist met"" ods in a particular organization. The sincerity and depf of the individual's conversion may be measured by tW individual's subsequent behavior. If he supports no of" Communist organizations or campaigns subsequent ,0 his first break, it may be assumed that this break is siOj cere and thorough. If, however, his name is to be foul"' supporting such organizations or campaigns at a latfH date, it may be properly concluded that his break V% neither genuine nor substantial (b) Unwitting fellow travelers. — It would be only vf\ to indicate that individuals have supported Communis inspired organizations in the belief that such organization were accomplishing some meritorious, social purpose. TM may have had not the faintest notion as to the organic tion's Communist character, they may even be anti-Cof^ munist. In other words, they may be outright dupes. Su* names are not usually found in organizations of an outnf?* Communist character. Nevertheless, the Communists <5 come their financial and moral support. The Communists are perfectly frank in admitting usefulness of the fellow traveler. F. Brown, an agent of' , Communist International who operated in the Unw. States in the 1930's, who was also known as Alpi *"< Marini, has testified to that fact in the Daily Worker August 25, 1937, page 2, where he declares: It is no exaggeration to state that besides the 55,000 Corn- nuiiiist members, there are today tens of thousands ol individ- mils who are active in every field of the progressive move* in, ut, carrying out the line of the Party in practice. They wo1* shoulder to shoulder with the Party members, follow t'lL" Party line through our press — Daily Worker, Sunday \VorMr> language press, through the mass activities of th,- Party^ mass meetings, lectures, .nu! all struggles in which tin- Cow i, ii mists arc in tin- Ion-front. ° * ° We must point out: l-i'^"' that their actual work is appreciated by the Party; secon" • that we consider their work Communist work and want tin'11 to continue it. How to Judge a Fellow Traveled It is possible to set up definite standards for judgMj :: ..•"I fellow traveler's devotion to the Communist Party an1 Soviet Union, which must be taken into consideratW judging his loyalty to the United States. This scale "s hard and fast. It cannot be applied mechanically. I* J1, be utilized intelligently with an eye to the history ol j. period, our current relations with the Soviet Union, age of the individual at the time of his affiliations. \i possible changes in his views. It should be recognized I an individual who has passed through certain experf*| with Communist organizations and who has been J oughly and completely disillusioned, can be of con*" ft able value in counteracting Communist machination''J adopt an attitude of "once a fellow traveler, always •' I low traveler," is to place an obstacle in the path ol '""^ education of such individuals and to make it und<'*"' for an individual to desert their ranks. The following should, therefore, be kept in mind in judging a >l traveler. I. The number of his associations with Cornm" controlled organizations. Facts Fohi'm News, \;""' 2. Th, these or such poor who i "big nar, "on.) 3. The 4. The JBunist s 5. iiis ?*posure 6. His at<'S luid 7. His 8. His Soviet I ni«s and n'ons. 9. His Patliizers Ext t|T|'c lates J federal it recenl P of 31,6 Co *kbama Jifeona **ansas ^''i'orm., Colorado Fj*nnectici £>°rida Idaho "illOiv ""liana c '' S»osas Stl.cky Lon- ■ ..""'•"'aiia jMUne inland fichus ">>.«-„, '""-■I., ;s PPi ■ "«"nri Stana S*raska vV-'d., "^Han to, nil sl„,u | E '" revie Piz ."'Kin.,, t ha,i 111! 1936 193] 1932 lb I
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