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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 050
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 050. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1099.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 050. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1099

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 050, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1099.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 050
Transcript wanted to turn the clock back twenty years. Parents who were eager that their children learn about the great American heritage through history were called reactionaries. Those who asked for drill, phonetics, more emphasis on the 3-R's, and teaching the alphabet, were looked upon with suspicion or amusement. At last, people knew that they had to accept Goslin's program of education without questioning, and they were furious. They rebelled. Mr. Goslin never admitted the real areas of conflict. He claimed that his opposition favored education for the aristocracy, whereas his supporters favored education for all. To say that the fight over progressive education was a conflict between the aristocracy and the common man was a fabrication. There was no evidence to support such an idea. This was not a class struggle. Yet, by his own definition, Willard Goslin set the stage for the class struggle between the aristocracy and the common man; he divided the people of Pasadena by using the class approach. Besides stressing the need for eliminating inequalities, the Goslin program over-emphasized discrimination. Race and class consciousness was first created and then race feeling was agitated. There is voluminous evidence to show that this radical human-relations program was nationally sponsored. To the average man, race and class agitation is a crime against society. To the social planners it was essential in order to effect change. In spite of the swelling tide of dissatisfaction, Mr. Goslin stunned the people by asking for a 50 per cent tax increase for the elementary district on April 12, 1950. For months the superintendent had ridden roughshod over the people. Now he dared to ask for more money to support his roughshod tactics. If he had scanned the horizon he would have seen smoke signals springing up all over the city. If he had read the signals correctly, he would have known that he had pressed the people too far, and that this was not the time to call for an election. The past history of Pasadena must have made Willard Goslin confident of success because there never had been a school tax defeat. In 1948, a few months after Mr. Goslin came to Pasadena, a $5,150,000 school bond issue passed by a majority of almost 6 to 1. What possible reason could there be to suspect a tax failure in 1950? The majority of the people in Pasadena agreed that a tax increase was needed. This was a period of inflation. Costs were steadily rising. Teachers' salaries had to be adjusted to meet the higher cost of living. More teachers and more facilities had to be provided. These were facts. Every one in Pasadena had to face them whether they voted Yes or No. The people had to take these facts and weigh them against the threat that Willard Goslin brought to the schools. If they supported the tax, they would be voting in favor of continuing to support a program of education that had created misunderstanding between teachers and parents, and conflict between races. As the people weighed the need of the tax against the threat, they knew that they must defeat the tax. This was not an easy decision. Many people felt that by voting against the tax they would deprive their children of necessities for a school year. Many were angry and ashamed to defeat a tax so obviously needed; but there was no other way. If they could have had an election to pass on Page 48 Willard Goslin, it would not have been necessary to defeat the tax. But the only machinery given to the voters through which they could make a majority protest was the tax election. On June 2, 38 per cent of the voters (32,242), an unprecedented turnout, swarmed to the election booths in Pasadena. In the secrecy of the voting booth 22,210 individuals stamped their disapproval of the Goslin administration. The tax increase failed by a majority of 2 to 1. If Pasadena had abolished the majority vote in favor of group dynamics with its accompanying consensus, as advocated by Mr. Goslin and his associates, there would have been no election and the tax increase would have passed. It was the majority vote that opposed him. This should be a warning against group dynamics and the group process as taught in Pasadena. The people in Pasadena voted No for the same reason that the founders of this country overthrew British control — "No taxation without representation." Willard Goslin denied the people the right to representation in their schools; therefore, the people defeated the tax. Aftkk the tax failure, Mr. Goslin should have conceded victory and worked cooperatively to adjust the school program to meet the people's demands. There was n" evidence of such cooperation. Progressive education is based on the philosophy " pragmatism, i.e., no absolute truth. A thing is true only f°' the moment in which it is useful. Under pragmatism then would be no permanent religious doctrines or moral stand' ards. However, America was founded on moral values. 'fl the past we were taught moral principles, love of country' that honesty is the best policy and anything less th* honesty is wrong in the sight of God, that man was ml"' for eternal destiny, that man should look to himself 'c' salvation and not to the state, and that courage, inti"' gence, and hard work should be rewarded. Exponents of progressive education claim that cofflfl tition is a warping influence on a child, and they opPoS, it. But competition is a basic condition of human life Iin cannot be abolished. Progressive education talks about the individual. D1- stresses conformity with the crowd. It offers no rew;"' for excellence and no moral standard for young pe"l' to hang onto. Criticism of communistic influence was contained . tt letter submitted by the School Development Con"c (an organization which opposed Goslin). In the '>'" they expressed fear of the Columbia cult and the ]' Dewey philosophy. They pointed out that certain te;,, books and audio-visual material were slanted. Thev' si"! "As the University of California president, Dr. R0^ Cordon Sproul, stated, the struggle between commu"11' and American democracy is not a debate, but war- . found, and we are sure, that the majority of teacher* I our public schools are excellent teachers as well as 6*J lent Americans. But an instructor or administrative V member or civilian aide who follows the Communist H certainly lias no 'right' to employment or continued se** ill a public institution of the United States." 1 ins letter brought Mr. Goslin face to face with the f^J that had been harassing many Pasadena citizens ''"if long time. He should have been ready with an ;i'lSV\ J If he had been a wise administrator he would have <fl this opportunity to remove suspicion of his administra" .A Facts Forum News, April- r POMMUNJ ?* not str, £n,v p« '""'iiiuns, >s so KB ,;'"">■ sue "nnocei, ged to ice 'tl, re?pl v ■■Gosl t,, ''-it he t»j '*'"' retu torho tf ©se v ange fcai Tea< Of hab,isive |>es ftev ^il.lei, df '"en w , ""' hand
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