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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 049
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 049. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1098.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 049. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1098

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 049, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1098.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 049
Transcript ■raf1 came from outside Pasadena. It would not have been possible lor him to work with the existing personnel of the Pasadena schools. Subterranean channels were used to introduce curriculum changes, and members of the central staff were not "insulted. For example, the five-hour core program (in W'hich English, history, geography, social studies, art, and other subjects were incorporated as one) was started in ""ie of the junior high schools. By undercutting supervisors at the control office and the principals, and by disseminating changes directly to the teachers, the control of curriculum was centralized in the superintendent. Another irregularity is to be found in the fact that no Permanent record of curriculum changes was kept during Mr. Goslin's superintendency. Specific changes could not 'l(' traced through any definite channel to the administration. The method of selecting textbooks was so vague that uo one person could be held responsible. In less than two years Willard Goslin not only succeeded in organizing a tremendous sales machine, but *»0 in changing the policies so as to give him greater control. For a short period he enjoyed a position of absolute Power. The personnel and policy changes gave him direct control over the school system. The program changes Hnuld have spread this control to the community. I * Examining the facts, one finds that he introduced a PW method of indoctrination: group dynamics, "an area research in the group aspects of social change." In Practice, this means that the group is the channel through 'Hell social change is made. To accomplish this, the jVm people wanted this- "embers are conditioned to think in terms of change. An ' bareness of the need for change is created so as to direct new social order openly advocated indoctrination. Dr. George S. Counts said, "You will say, no doubt, that I am flirting with the idea of indoctrination. And my answer is again in the affirmative." The Pasadena conflict might have been avoided if the people had been aware of the dangers of the technique of "divide and conquer." But what was this technique? Pasadena had no example to follow. She did not know of any other city that had been torn apart as she was. Therefore, she could not profit by the experience of others. Research material indicates that the agitation in Pasadena vvtis not accidental, but planned. The planners must have examined the history of Pasadena to determine its weaknesses. One (weak) factor in Pasadena was progressive education, which had long been smoldering under recurrent streams of protest. There had been flurries of disapproval of progressive education in Pasadena, but no violent reactions. Differences of opinion were respected. Teachers and parents were not discredited for voicing their opinions. Ulterior motives were not read into people's objections. In the normal course of events, the dispute over progressive education would have been settled cooperatively or would have subsided. Why didn't this happen in Pasadena? It didn't happen because the disputed phases of progressive education were accentuated by the Goslin administration despite the well-known dissatisfaction. Thus coals were heaped on the smoldering fire and the flames of protest were fanned. There was no attempt made to settle the dispute. the group toward this change. Change is the underlying "|<(' lor action. Every member of the group thinks of him- U as tt "change agent," a person trained to effect change. "' complete sublimation of individual identity is essen- '" for group productivity. The goal of group dynamics is "r""P productivity. Members of the study groups recognized that there ',(' spotters who had been indoctrinated in advance with More stress on the 3-R's and basic fundamentals. Fixed ived cornel tlllin vcr the 0 Goslin program and with the group goals. These iced and pressured lor certain ideas to be Hi, j*°p]e introdi ( c''i(lcd .is part of the group thinking. Thev- also worked Aether to reject ideas. Example: One teacher had just been exposed to Coni- .un"St activities and felt that she should awaken people t "'<' danger of communism in the schools. She waited , r die leader or someone else in the group to introduce . . Problem. During the first three meetings nothing was . '' about communism, hut she observed that the leader More discipline | adult, children). More stress on the teaching of American history .mil civics. Higher standards of achievement. Less talk about psychology, guidance, reading readiness; more time devoted to the actual learning process. Assurance that speakers invited to lecture in tlie schools would support tlie American way of Ille. This is what they were offered: Widen the curriculum to a 100 per cent experience curriculum with no stress on the fundamentals. No fixed curriculum. ('.roup self-discipline (by the children; classroom freedom). More stress on world history, world citizenship, and living democracy within the group. No grades, no failures. More emphasis on the need of psychologists and guidance in the home. Intolerance ol public opinion as to die subversive connections of the speakers. gro! the recorder worked together to indoctrinate the Vti!D' Finally she told the group about her experience r, '' Communists, and suggested that there should he a r. I,S(-' in the schools to point out the dangers of com- '•"M.I. l Hie leader looked at the recorder and said, "Witch- V eh?" J'"' recorder added, "lied herring." lit, . was •'"■ Her suggestion vvtis dropped. She was 1^ '"Hated. The subject of communism did not appear in ■*pOrt of the discussion group. tv kr \ "" s "' indoctrination did not originate with Wil- '■nslm. One of the most influential planners of the I \ fanuary, 1950, the Pasadena Independent published tin editorial revealing its views on progressive education; the public vvtts invited to submit letters on the school debate. Response was overwhelming. In general, the letters asked lor more emphasis on the 3-R's, spelling, discipline, American history, and for the restoration of the good features of past educational programs. Most people felt that after these public protests something would be done to settle the dispute. Instead, something was done that widened the rift. The people who protested were stoned with words. Mr. Goslin began to discredit his opposition. When people asked sincere questions about the origin of progressive education, thev were told that some people k I ing e Ts K out vi News, April, 1956 Page 47
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